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My options to reduce LOP w/o cutting stock?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by vpr80, Oct 26, 2009.

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  1. vpr80

    vpr80 Active Member

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    I guess I know the answer to this, but I'll ask anyway. My 687 has a LOP that's about 1/2" too long for me so I need to shorten it, but (1) I really rather not cut the stock and (2) I don't want to make the felt recoil worse.

    Is it worth spending $50 on a new Beretta thin Gel Pad or would that just make the recoil worse and only shave 1/4"?

    If cutting the stock is really my only option, anyone know someone around Northern NJ that can do it? I don't really want to send it out.

    Thanks

    PS - I want to keep this low cost so I'm not interested in expensive LOP adjustment systems.
     
  2. Pull & Mark

    Pull & Mark Well-Known Member

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    vpr80, have you given any thought to a PFS !!!! They are a bit pricey, but are totally adj. and will take away any problems with recoil. No need to cut stock or get more recoil. You will get your money back for both when, and if you decide to sell them. Good Luck and Break-em all. Jeff
     
  3. JACK

    JACK Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    [​IMG]


    yah-ah
     
  4. Bridger

    Bridger Member

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    Get the stock cut so it will fit you. Why fight a poor fit? You bought the gun to shoot, so get it to the right length of pull. Putting on a thin pad will increase recoil and probably still not give you what you need.
    There are probably better choices than a Beretta pad. I like Kickeez but there are other good ones. Any competent gunsmith should be able to put on a pad. If you don't know of one in your area ask around at the gun club and get some ideas of who in your area to use.
     
  5. jimrich60

    jimrich60 Member

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    Really depends on what pad your gun has now. If it is a full one inch thick, you could have a 1/2 inch pad put on the gun. Might increase felt recoil just a little, but probably not really noticeably so. Would not bother with the Beretta pad as you would only decrease LOP about 1/4 inch. If you really need a full 3/4 or 1 inch pad for comfort, you will have to cut the stock. The other option is another stock (and put the original away) but that is pretty expensive, and a PFS stock will really set you back

    Jim R
     
  6. vpr80

    vpr80 Active Member

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    Ehhhh figured as much....how much should it cost to cut the stock?
     
  7. ivanhoe

    ivanhoe Well-Known Member

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    vpr80 I will give you an opinion it may not be popular with you. In the long run you might see the light you might not.

    You have a gun, what you paid for it is your business I am however willing to bet that unless you got a steal on the gun any money you spend to make the gun fit you is the most important expenditure you will make.

    If you leave it the way it is you will not shoot up to your potential. Not to mention the bad habits you may teach yourself in the long run shooting when it is ill fitting.

    You say you need to shorten it but you don't want to cut it. You don't say why if it is resale value you and you don't cut it you have already lost the money because you have tied up your money and will not receive the benefit until you make up your mind to do what it takes to make it fit. Very few shooter can buy a gun off the rack that is a good fit without changes.

    Bob Lawless
     
  8. Old Doc

    Old Doc Member

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    Trapshooting myth # xyz. This stock is to pretty to cut. Pull Bang Lost. Who cares what it looks like if it breaks targets. D Winter
     
  9. Chaseguy

    Chaseguy TS Member

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    Ed Yanchok the stock doctor can cut your stock, his number is 908-753-2365 , he did a great job on my gun. Good luck
     
  10. KENENT1

    KENENT1 Active Member

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    take the pad off and wear a couple of sweat shirts for winter.....make a wood recoil pad tapered to add more pitch....shoot it like that a couple of weeks and see if you really want it like that, then cut it off, and fit another pad, if you like it.


    if your worried about recoil, shoot 1 oz. loads.


    I shoot mine like this in the winter.



    tony
     
  11. jimrich60

    jimrich60 Member

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    A decent (I really like Kick-Eez) pad will cost around $25-$35, plus gunsmith cutting of the stock and install new pad so total probably around $75-$100, give or take a few bucks. As others have said, a gun that does not fit you properly is almost as bad as no gun at all. But before you have the stock cut, take the time to really find out just what LOP ,etc it is you really need to have a well fitted gun. Check with knowledgeable folks, if possible have fit checked by someone, or get a good book on stock fit. Then decide just how much it should be shortened, or otherwise altered to fit you properly. You may be surprised. Good gun fit makes a world of difference.

    Jim R
     
  12. 635 G

    635 G Well-Known Member

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    See if you can put an adjustable trigger from a 682 on your gun---contact Joel Etchen. Fit is everthing. If it doesn't fit, wou can't hit consistantly.

    Phil Berkowitz
     
  13. washandwear

    washandwear Member

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    Hi

    Buy another (less expensive)stock and cut it to fit keeping the original in case you decide to sell in the future.

    Regards

    W&W
     
  14. vpr80

    vpr80 Active Member

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    I know, I know....gun fit is priority number 1!

    No I don't want to cut it because I might want to sell it at some point in time. Also don't want to deal getting another set of wood. And adjustable trigger is an interesting idea, but it's not enough adjustment to help me.

    Maybe I'll give Ed a call, anyone else worked with him?
     
  15. OldRemFan

    OldRemFan Member

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    My suggestion is to take the pad off, get a piece of high density foam from a camera store or where ever and cut it to the thickness you need, if necessasry, to obtain the 1/2 inch reduction in overall length. Stand the gun on the foam mark around the stock, cut the foam where you marked with a box cutter, then tape the shaped foam to the but with electricians tape, masking tape or whatever and go shoot the gun. The length may not by your only problem, or the half inch may not be exactly correct either. It is easy to find out before doing something that may not be needed to a perfectly good stock.

    It's the old measure twice, cut once approach. Saves a lot of good wood.
     
  16. GunDr

    GunDr Well-Known Member

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    An adjustable trigger does not have anything to do with where your head sits on the stock.
     
  17. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    I've faced the same dilemma every time I've bought a new trap gun. In fact, just last night, I dropped off a rifle stock I recently purchased at a stockmaker's to have it shortened. And the Beretta 687's stock (I shoot one, too) poses the challenge of a longish Monte Carlo comb which limits how much straight wood can be removed before the "uglies" set in.

    I also need the pad angle changed as I am on the "chesty" side and if a pad is straight up and down, the toe digs into my chest. Having the pad angle made adjustable adds 3/8" to the stock's length (one 1/4" aluminum plate and one 1/8" plate) given the same thickness pad. The final complication is that Beretta's recoil pads (which really make better stock protectors than recoil adsorbing devices) aren't real thick to start with, so less can be gained by switching to a thinner pad than would be possible if their pads were thicker.

    I have photos of my stock, but they are on the PC I use at home or I would post it for you here but basically, I had the stock shortened as far as possible - just into the slope at the back of the Monte Carlo. Then the adjustable pad plate on the stock was tapered from the slope to level where the pad plate meets it. The pad plate was left full-size for two reasons - a larger pad surface will spread the felt recoil over a larger area and future pad replacements will not require any grinding to fit the plate. The mismatch is invisible because the plates are not aligned with each other; the one the pad is attached to is canted and lowered a little from the one attached to the stock. Finally, I used the thinnest Kick-Eez Rocker pad available (1/2", I believe) and the result is a stock that is almost 1/2" shorter and still looks good.

    A stock that is shortened 1/2" or so really is not a negative in terms of resale value. Production gun stocks are made to fit the "average" person, who really doesn't exist, and are intentionally made a little too long because it is easier to remove wood than to add some on. If you observe some of your fellow shooters, you'll see that a lot of them have several inches between their control hand's thumb and their nose, a good indicator that their stock is too long.

    The good news about your buddies' stocks is that as a result, your slightly shortened stock probably will fit more potential buyers better than if it wasn't shortened. And even if it is too short for the person who would like to buy your gun, making it longer again is as easy to do as changing to a thicker pad, putting a black spacer (which are sold for that purpose) between the pad and the wood or, if the pad is adjustable, the plate to which it is attached. If the pad is adjustable, replacing the plates with thicker ones would add 1/8" to 3/8" to the length. Add all those lengthening methods together and your stock could be inexpensively and attractively made to fit just about anyone.

    The work I described should not cost more than $150, including a new pad. Spending that much to have any gun fit you better should be a no-brainer.

    In short, there are all kinds of visually and financially attractive ways of making a stock fit you and me while still being able to be easily changed to fit someone who actually has a neck.

    Ed
     
  18. vpr80

    vpr80 Active Member

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    Thanks for all the feedback guys, now just to find someone local that can do the work. I think I am also going to try and get someone who actually knows what they are tabling about to fit me for both of my guns so I don't have to guess whether I need to shorten it by 3/8" or 1/2" or even more and I don't even realize it.
     
  19. over the hill

    over the hill Active Member

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    Before you do anything, a small investment in Rollins book would be a good place to start.

    You may have other issues beside LOP.

    Good reading and a you have it for future reference.



    Regards....Gerald
     
  20. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    Oops - while reading the thread about your automatic safety, I realized who you are and that your 687 is not a trap gun. Therefore, you can disregard all that info my post baove about the Monte Carlo comb.

    Ed
     
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