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Muzzel Loading Rifle Question

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Jimborn, Dec 16, 2010.

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  1. Jimborn

    Jimborn TS Member

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    If you want to load an inline .50 Cal. Rifle the night before a hunt, do you want to store it in the truck that night to hunt the next morning at 12 degrees, rather than loading it and keeping it inside? (No cap on the nipple of course)
     
  2. Chadshot

    Chadshot Member

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    I load mine and leave it in the truck. Pretty much stays there or garage till season is over. Will shoot it, clean, reload after week if temp goes way down and back up. Never had a problem doing this.
     
  3. trapshooterjoe7

    trapshooterjoe7 Member

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    You will get all kind of answers, going from warm to cold is fine, going from cold to warm is what causes the gun to sweat and get moist on the inside as well as the out side,moisture is the cause of misfires.I have tried leaving my muzzle loader in my truck for a week and had no problems, because it changes temperature slowly and does not sweat. My 2$ worth. Joe
     
  4. School Teacher

    School Teacher Well-Known Member

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    I have kept my muzzle loader loaded overnight with a Bore Butter lubed patch over the nipple and the hammer down with no ill effect. I kept the rifle in an outside shed or in my van overnight while we slept in a warm camper.

    In cold and/or damp weather, I prefer to load in the morning and to pop two caps on the empty barrel to drive out any moisture that may have accumulated overnight. This requires the weapon to be fired when returning to camp and to run a couple of Bore Butter lubed patches down the barrel before putting a Bore Butter lubed patch over the nipple with the hammer down.

    My understanding of 18th century military tactics is that soldiers carried their rifles or muskets unloaded and only loaded when ready to fight. Maybe this was for safety reasons or maybe to ensure that the weapon would shoot when required.

    Ed Ward
     
  5. sliverbulletexpress

    sliverbulletexpress TS Member

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    If you can't park in a secured place don't leave it in the truck. With modern blackpowder substitutes I don't think you have as much to worry about. I usually load mine when I get to the woods and unload it just before I leave, yeh I have to clean it when I get home.
     
  6. smokinbuck

    smokinbuck Member

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    I shoot ML's almost exclusivley and have to agree with TrapshoooterJoe. Cold into warm will cause condensation.
    Mark
     
  7. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    No matter if its my Black Powder gun or any of my others they NEVER, NEVER, NEVER stay in the vehicle overnight. Why you ask? Well ask the guy who posted here about his guns stolen from his vehicle. Its a bad idea no matter how you slice it. I have a .50 cal Muzzle Loader and i've left it loaded for 2 weeks in and out of the house and its never failed to fire.

    Matt
     
  8. Ahab

    Ahab Well-Known Member

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    When my father was a kid ... there was a ML in the corner for many years ... but it had a bullet lodged up near the muzzle. Someone tried to load it with an over sized ball and got it stuck ... couldn't get it out or drive it in.

    He wanted his own gun, even if it was taller than he was. He tied it to a tree and with a long string, got behind another tree ... BOOM ... muzzle peeled back like a banana skin.

    He took it to the shop where he was apprenticing as a blacksmith and the sawed off the bad end, and reinstalled the bead.

    It turned out to be an accurate shooter, even with the shortened barrel.
     
  9. g7777777

    g7777777 TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    You can put a piece of scotch tape over the mulzzle and lower the hammer - no water will be absorbed if that is what you are worried about.

    regards from Iowa

    Gene
     
  10. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    You might look into one of the compressed air dischargers so you can put a fresh load into it. Blackpowder is agroscopic, meaning it readily absorbs moisture. This can do anything from change the ballistics for the worse to render it useless when you need it. This is also one reason why I prefer blackpowder in metallic cartridges, like the 45-70. I can seal them. But of course they're not legal for muzzleloader season.
     
  11. blkcloud

    blkcloud Active Member

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    I keep mine loaded year round.. done this for 22 years.. never had one to not fire on the first shot since I started using the 209 primers..
     
  12. Doug Brown

    Doug Brown Well-Known Member

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    I take it you guys who advocate keeping them in the truck, don't run the heater either? I've kept mine loaded for 30 days; between the truck, garage & house. They always go boom, when you pull the trigger.
     
  13. Pocatello

    Pocatello Active Member

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    Years ago I missed an elk in very cold weather because of a hangfire. I asked our local expert, Davy Crockett (true - that is his real name!), and he said it was because I was using Pyrodex, which is harder to ignite than black powder. He convinced me to switch to FFFg, and I've never had a problem since. I've always fired the gun at the end of the day, and reload the next morning, but would not have a problem with leaving one loaded for a night or two.
     
  14. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    The In-line guns are pretty forgiving especially if you are using a 209 primer to light things up. My bet is you won't have ignition ptoblems whether you keep the gun in your truck or in the house the night before the hunt.

    I shoot a traditonal cap lock and things need to be just right to get dependable ignition. My solution is to shoot the gun at the end of the day and clean out the ignition pathways & bore at home then recharge the nest moring with a fresh load. I also found real black to provide better ignition than pyrodex but fouling is worse so I use a 15g charge of FFF Goex under the main charge of pyrodex.
     
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