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Museum question re: ammo

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by CalamitySJ, Jan 27, 2010.

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  1. CalamitySJ

    CalamitySJ Member

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    I know many of you are also pistol/rifle people so I thought I'd ask:

    My museum has WWII ammo we'd like to display however we need to remove the powder first. We'd like the final product to look exactly like it did before powder removal, if possible. The kicker is that some of the ammo is Japanese and lightly corroded; the other is for an M1 Garand.

    Ideas? Is it even possible? Thanks in advance--you guys are the best.

    CSJ
     
  2. K-80BUD

    K-80BUD TS Member

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    Get a kinetic bullet puller, pull the bullet, dump the powder and reseat the bullet. Bud Wood
     
  3. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    Yes it is possible and not difficult.

    Use a kinetic puller to pull the bullet, dump the powder on your lawn, put the primed case in a rifle and fire the primer, polish the cases in a vibratory cleaner until you get the desired shine, reseat the bullet to original overall length. You will need a loading press and seating die to do a good job of reseating the bullet. You shouldn't have a problem finding somebody set up to load 30/06 but finding somebody with a seating die for the Jap rounds might be trickier especially if they are other than the 7.7MM.
     
  4. CalamitySJ

    CalamitySJ Member

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    I know many of you are also pistol/rifle people so I thought I'd ask:

    My museum has WWII ammo we'd like to display however we need to remove the powder first. We'd like the final product to look exactly like it did before powder removal, if possible. The kicker is that some of the ammo is Japanese and lightly corroded; the other is for an M1 Garand.

    Ideas? Is it even possible? Thanks in advance--you guys are the best.

    CSJ
     
  5. K-80BUD

    K-80BUD TS Member

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    Get a kinetic bullet puller, pull the bullet, dump the powder and reseat the bullet. Bud Wood
     
  6. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    Yes it is possible and not difficult.

    Use a kinetic puller to pull the bullet, dump the powder on your lawn, put the primed case in a rifle and fire the primer, polish the cases in a vibratory cleaner until you get the desired shine, reseat the bullet to original overall length. You will need a loading press and seating die to do a good job of reseating the bullet. You shouldn't have a problem finding somebody set up to load 30/06 but finding somebody with a seating die for the Jap rounds might be trickier especially if they are other than the 7.7MM.
     
  7. Porcupine

    Porcupine Active Member

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    South Central Massachusetts
    An inertia-type bullet remover is probably your best bet to remove the head without damaging it. The primer is a concern as well. Maybe a drop or two of light oil in the empty case may render the primer harmless? That's just a guess. When you put the head back in you'll need to duplicate any factory crimp. Then again, most people wouldn't notice. Good luck.

    LA in MA
     
  8. Recoil Sissy

    Recoil Sissy Well-Known Member

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    I don't mean to hijack the thread but does anybody know FOR SURE how to make a primer inert without firing it?

    sissy
     
  9. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    Sissy, oils or solvents will probably do the trick but having a fired (dented) primer is good visual confirmation that the ammo is inert.
     
  10. sle081

    sle081 Member

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    Sally
    if its for a museum and is to be contained in a "display" only and no one is handeling it, why remove the powder? Ammunition in a static display is not a danger. If you feel you have the powder and primers removed the folks on the prior post have the answer, just sounds like lots of work for a "display"
    DOG
    Glad to see Mark came through his ordeal and is doing well. Come back to Proctor somtime this summer !!
     
  11. brent375hh

    brent375hh TS Member

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    WD-40 makes primers dead as a doornail. You can also deprime after the WD-40 and remove the anvil and compound, then reseat the cup only. If the primer is crimped heavily, depriming may have leave an inverse divot upon depriming.

    I can do the 30-06 for you (unless you have a whole ammo can of it). I don't know what rim the japanese ammo has, sorry.
     
  12. PerazziBigBore

    PerazziBigBore TS Member

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    Kroil will kill primers dead...a few drops in each case.. let stand overnight... rinse with denaturel alchol..dry.. reinsert bullet.. The tar sealer will normally keep the fit quite tight.. Factory looking.. recrimp if you need to..(I've never needed to)..
     
  13. g7777777

    g7777777 TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Use some type of bulk solvent to make the primer inert-- something like a can of kerosene might work.

    Just soak it for a week or so

    Pull several at random of the different types and fire it- after the bullet is pulled of course

    regards from Iowa

    gene
     
  14. CalamitySJ

    CalamitySJ Member

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    Thank you so much for all the suggestions. My understanding from the curator is that policy dictates ammo be presented this way; my job is to find a way to make it happen. Sissy, thanks for the question on the primer issue, that really helped. Now to find someone in Minnesota willing to give it a try!

    And Proctor is already on our shooting schedule as a 'must attend' site for 2010 so we will be up there, guaranteed. Your shoots have the best breakfast in the State.

    Sally
     
  15. brent375hh

    brent375hh TS Member

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    "I don't mean to hijack the thread but does anybody know FOR SURE how to make a primer inert without firing it"?

    Yes. A primer lacking both the anvil and lead styphnate pellet will not fire. It is only a brass cup at this point.

    The only way EVERYONE will know it is inert is by removing it. A dented primer
    may be one that did not go off, as opposed to (the assumed) one that has gone off. One that has the anvil & compound removed is only known inert by the person who removed it.

    My 3rd paragraph is my admission of lack of thought in the 2nd paragraph.
     
  16. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Remember if you shoot those primers in your gun wash the barrel out with soap and water. They are corrosive primers. HMB
     
  17. skeezix

    skeezix Member

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    I suspect all those primers are Berdan style primers, not the US civilian style boxer primer that we all know and love. I've not messed with Berdan primers or surpluss brass that was built for Berdan primers before, but I believe their removal is somewhat more complicated than just punching them out - especially if you are trying to preserve the primer cup. Since these are for a museum they should be historically accurate. It would be good if the primers could be removed, the priming mixture removed, and then reseat the primer cup.

    John
     
  18. JB Logan Co. Ohio

    JB Logan Co. Ohio TS Member

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    Once powder is removed is it possible to torch heat the primer to get it to ignite without a firing pin strike? If you can you don't have to worry about the primer with a strike mark in it. Is this possible? Just a thought.

    JB=Jerry Beach 8503917
     
  19. pyrdek

    pyrdek Well-Known Member

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    Only problem with the torch is that the primer charge, when it detonates, will most like launch the primer out of the pocket unless it is firmly supported bu some type of retaining device. In a gun the bolt holds it against the pressure but an open torch offers no support. Even firing in a gun without a powder charge will often distort the primer a bit with a bit of a bulge unless the bolt face is tightly anchored
     
  20. PerazziBigBore

    PerazziBigBore TS Member

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    when I went to New Orleans Academy.. I was incharge of the drill rifles.. i had to make display shells that could not be fired.. but looked the part.. I pulled the bullets on countless 7mm mauser shells.. Killed the primers with Kroil and reassembled.. Of the many hundreds I did..40 were selected at random and tested.. Not 1 fired.. period.. I'll stand behind Kroil killing primers..and especially with older shells.. And yes.. you could soak them in mineral spirits for a week or two.. and have exactly the same results..
     
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