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moving before the bird actually appears

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Brian in Oregon, Jan 28, 2008.

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  1. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    I was doing that exact thing, and can tell you how to correct it, but it's going to have to be on the field.

    My coach stood behind me and manually released the bird after I called for it. Except sometimes he would delay the release. It became very obvious very quickly that I had the gun in motion well ahead of the bird. He told me to slow down, that there was no need to rush it as there really was plenty of time, and to wait until I visually saw the bird. I was getting away with it to a certain extent at the time because I was using a very light gun that was whippy, so I could jink the barrel around to compensate. But after slowing down, my scores went up. This was because I was missing some of the more widely flung birds.
     
  2. Harold

    Harold TS Member

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    I think shooting wobble trap helps with that.
     
  3. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Slowing down a little may help this problem. There is a simple way, which many will not believe until they try it, to slow down. Mount your gun, close your eyes and call pull. Then open your eyes and go after the target. You will have a great surprise when you try this. Often your score will go up and it will most likely, never go down.

    But, for me to be successful, I need to have an aggressive attitude before I call pull. This results in my shooting rather fast. I catch myself late in the season, sometimes moving my gun a bit to the left just as I call when I am on post one. I am anticipating a hard left but rarely get one when I make this premature move. It only happens late in the season when I have been shooting a lot of targets. I just tell myself not to do it again and sometimes myself listens to me.

    Pat Ireland
     
  4. BIGDON

    BIGDON Well-Known Member

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    It is anticipation of your worst fear the dreaded right or left off of 5 or 1. Especially if you have had a steady diet of them. I just tell myself to slow down and wait on the target. What makes it hard is if you anticipate and are successful then your memory banks start telling you that is what you have to do on that post. Just keep telling yourself the old adage "It's one bird at a time". Good Luck.

    Shoot, shoot often.

    Don
     
  5. bigben

    bigben Active Member

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    Funshoot, many move their guns because they move their EYES around just before calling, many times this is because they hold the gun too low over the trap house and just as the call for the target is given the eyes dart to the front of the trap house in a "scanning " move, if you want to shoot the trap house fine, look at it but if you want to shoot a target, get the gun higher[even you one-eyed shooters] and look over the barrel only, a soft focus out about 15-20 yds., now keep the eyes still, when the target clears the rib, you will see a WHOLE, clear shootable, hittable target, a slight move to it and a smoked target is the result! At home you can mount the gun horizontal to the floor, look over the rib, actually call for the target with still, "killer" eyes then move the eyes to a picture, a knot, anything that;s just above and left and right of you,move to it and as your barrel passes through it fire [with a snap cap] smoothly, at first you will find just how jerky you are, practice this smoothly and watch your scores go up! incinerate em!
     
  6. Capt. Morgan

    Capt. Morgan TS Member

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    "Does anyone know of a training exercise that can be done at home to break this habit?"

    Stopping this behavior is just like quitting smoking.

    You can try all the gimmicks and games you want to, but in the end it will take self-control and self-discipline to change what you are doing. You will need to train yourself to concentrate on locking your eyes on each and every target that comes out of the house BEFORE you move to it...and shooting on a squad at the club on "practice night" is NOT the time to learn to do this.

    Morgan
     
  7. Don Rackley

    Don Rackley Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    One thing I have done is to use the Jordan wall chart and (with a snap cap in the unloaded gun) focus the eyes, mount, call for the target and not move to a target.

    It has helped me and you can do this at home.

    Don Rackley
     
  8. ftlupton

    ftlupton TS Member

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    Had this problem for years and tried everything. Guess what helped? I took up golf and had lessons from a great teacher. He got me concentrating on only the ball so much I now can really look hard for just the target. won't help everyone, of course, but helped me. In the past I was looking at too much out past the trap, wasn't focusing on the target hard enough. My 2 cents worth.
    Dick
     
  9. Jerry944t

    Jerry944t Well-Known Member

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    Phil Kiner taught me a neat little trick that you might want to incorporate in your practice sessions. Simply, you call for the bird with your eyes closed. After you call you open your eyes and look for the bird, move the gun to the bird and bang.

    What surprises everyone who tries this is that there is no rush to break the bird. Even with your eyes closed you have plenty of time to spot the bird and move the gun.

    What does happen is that there is no gun movement until you actually see the bird as you are not anticipating where the target may be.

    Jerry
     
  10. JEB

    JEB Active Member

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    Phil Kiner has a great drill, but it must be done on the field. Mount your gun, close your eyes and call pull, then open your eyes. You have a lot more time than you think, and if you are totally clueless about where it is going, you won't anticipate. I have the same problem. This works for a while at least.

    JEB
     
  11. Jerry944t

    Jerry944t Well-Known Member

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    You do the closed eye drill until you prove to yourself that you don't have to move the gun until you actually see the target.

    You don't do it for every round you shoot. If you find that you are moving the gun in anticipation of the target then do the drill until you loose that tendency.

    To reiterate, the purpose is to prove to your brain that a move doesn't have to be made until you have a clear picture of the target's flight.
     
  12. grnberetcj

    grnberetcj Active Member

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    Shoot at a wobble trap with a delayed pull.....

    Curt
     
  13. maclellan1911

    maclellan1911 TS Member

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    This helped me......After calling for pull YOU must stay in control and not move. I would mount my gun almost level with the ground. soft focus into the area above the field, call pull agressivly like you want to kill it. Then I would say I SEE YOU then move to the target. What seems to happen is you made this pre move automatic habbit. As far as time, target runs about 40 50 mph shot runs 800mph you can catch it.
     
  14. dward

    dward Member

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    When everything happens perfectly for me........I call for the bird and it appears right on time, my eyes lock quickly onto the bird, the gun begins moving early, and I watch the target break......my mind memorizes this. The more this happens the more my mind remembers. When things don't go "perfectly", the trained instincts, or muscle memory, can react to the "call", and start things based on what's happened in the past. So when things go right, the gun moves a certain amount of time after calling for the target. When the bird comes late, my instincts can begin moving the gun based on what's happened before.

    I think the suggestion that Kiner gave is right on. Learning to shoot the bird slowly or late, reinforces the belief/trust that there's no rush. On the flip side I agree with Pat in that my best scores in handicap come when I am aggressive and move the gun early.

    So practice shooting slow and be aggressive when shooting for score.

    My 2 cents - Big Dan
     
  15. lumper

    lumper TS Member

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    If you truly want to break yourself of the habit you could always try shooting from a semi-low gun ... not a full low gun but just drop the gun a couple inches out of your shoulder before BLAMMY BLASTING the target out of excistence.

    At least mounting the gun and all will hide the pre call movement problem you have.
     
  16. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    "moving before the bird actually appears" Whether or not this is a bad idea depends on how you make the move and why. Anticipating a tough angle from any station is a mistake. A good friend has always mounted his gun low on the trap and slowly begins his move toward the trap before calling. His slight move toward the trap when the clay appears makes for a pretty quick shot from the 27. His shooting accomplishments include a grand slam and probably more 100s from the 27 than most have from the 16. So, not all movement is bad? Hap
     
  17. Big Az Al

    Big Az Al Well-Known Member

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    When I am Aware that I am moving the gun before seeing the bird, I modify my what I am doing,

    then the last think I think before calling the bird, is "hold for it, STUPID"!

    Usually gets me back on track really quick!

    AL
     
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