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Most "American Made" Car - Toyota Camry

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by Brian in Oregon, Jul 22, 2009.

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  1. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    The Cars.com American-Made Index<br>
    By Kelsey Mays, Cars.com<br>
    What Are the Top American-Made Cars?<br>
    Cars.com's American-Made Index rates vehicles built and bought in the U.S. Factors include sales, where the car's parts are made and whether the car is assembled in the U.S. Models that have been discontinued are disqualified, as are those with a domestic-parts content rating below 75 percent.<br>
    <br>
    1. Toyota Camry<br>
    2. Ford F-150<br>
    3. Chevrolet Malibu<br>
    4. Honda Odyssey<br>
    5. Chevrolet Silverado<br>
    6. Toyota Sienna<br>
    7. Toyota Tundra<br>
    8. GMC Sierra 1500<br>
    9. Ford Taurus<br>
    10. Toyota Venza<br>
    <br>
    (More detailed info at the link)
     
  2. School Teacher

    School Teacher Well-Known Member

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    We love our Tundra made in Indiana and our Camry made in Kentucky. They are quiet, dependable and have excellent driving qualities.

    Toyota at Georgetown, KY is a major employer in the state and has been since the 1980's.

    As to resale valve, Toyota does real well.

    IMO, Toyota has great engineering and, along with Honda and the other Japanese manufactures, has taught America a lesson in quality control. True, Ford and GM are improving their quality but IMO they still lag Toyota.

    At one time, I thought that GM's Saturn would be an attempt by GM to match Toyota's Total Quality Management philosophy. However, Saturn will be sold off to the Penske Group as, from what I have read, that Saturn was not profitable.

    Total Quality Management (from the Wikipedia) is as follows:

    In Japan, TQM comprises four process steps, namely:


    1. Kaizen – Focuses on "Continuous Process Improvement", to make processes visible, repeatable and measurable.


    2. Atarimae Hinshitsu – The idea that "things will work as they are supposed to" (for example, a pen will write).


    3. Kansei – Examining the way the user applies the product leads to improvement in the product itself.


    4. Miryokuteki Hinshitsu – The idea that "things should have an aesthetic quality" (for example, a pen will write in a way that is pleasing to the writer).


    TQM requires that the company maintain this quality standard in all aspects of its business. This requires ensuring that things are done right the first time and that defects and waste are eliminated from operations.


    Ed Ward
     
  3. CalvinMD

    CalvinMD Well-Known Member

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    I love Camrys,..they are so entertaining to see when Kyle Busch splats one into the wall at 180mph trying to keep ahead of a Chevy
     
  4. SirMissalott

    SirMissalott Active Member

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    I love any car that isn't made by socialists.
     
  5. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    We have been trying to get LEAN (TQM) manufacturing to take hold im my company. It is the way to make a company world class but it is a hard sell with employees. If there is a silver lining to the current economic crisis it will be that surviving companies will have become 'LEAN' companies and the employees will have changed their mindset from what's in it for me right now to how can I make the best use of my abilities and keep my job.

    I do like my US made Landcruiser and all the other Toyotas I have owned. The quality was there every time.
     
  6. rich-s

    rich-s TS Member

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    I have a hard time believing this simply because of the silverado-sierra difference. These two trucks made on the same line in Kentucky can't be that far apart in the numbers. 5vs.8 ??? I'm calling bs on this one.
     
  7. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Rich, it may be possible because there may have been different options on the two otherwise seemingly identical trucks. No details were given as to what engine or transmission were in these two trucks. Some engines are made in Mexico. That might have been enough to alter the percentages right there.
     
  8. blizzard

    blizzard Active Member

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    If you have a company that makes the same parts over and over, like toothpicks or razor blades, LEAN works. Otherwise, you'd better use common sense and pick and choose pieces of LEAN to apply to your company. Otherwise, you WILL be sorry.
     
  9. cls

    cls Member

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    But the reality is that Asian automobile manufactures in the US (transplants) send the majority of their profits back to the parent company in Japan, Korea, etc...

    I've read that the transplants on average only reinvest 18 cents of every dollar American's spend on their vehicles in the US. US Domestic auto manufacturers reinvest 82 cents of every dollar here. The transplants' impact on the US economy is a pittance compared to the impact made by the domestics'.

    To further make this point, it is estimated the domestics directly or indirectly affect somewhere between 3 and 3.5 million jobs in the US. From the waitress who serves lunch to the wife of a Big 3 auto worker (or supplier) to the barber who cuts their kid's hair. Transplants account for somewhere in the neighborhood of 300,000 jobs, COMBINED!

    Aside from the huge disparity regarding their impact on our economy, there is the quality issue. There's NO doubt Toyota and Honda build extremely high quality vehicles. And for a few decades the Big 3 (sadly) built extremely poor quality vehicles. But that has changed. I'll admit the Asian car companies may still have the edge, but that edge is very small. The Big 3 have closed the quality gap with our Asian competitors to the point where it's almost negligible.

    It's real simple... BUY AMERICAN..! ;)
     
  10. cls

    cls Member

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    <i>From the Detroit News. cls</i>

    The Toyota Camry is more American than the Ford F-150, at least according to Cars.com's annual American-Made Index.

    The findings further muddy the buy American debate that rages across the country.

    Toyota Motor Corp. also is the most American car company, according to the rankings of the index in terms of U.S. content in its cars and trucks.

    The findings are based on where each vehicle is built, its popularity based on sales volume and the percentage of the parts made in the U.S. based on the cost or value of those parts.

    This year, the Camry (not counting the hybrid or the Solara) dethroned the F-150 which had been a five-time winner. The Ford truck came in at No. 2.

    Toyota had the most individual models on the list with four, including the Sienna minivan in the sixth spot, followed by the Tundra full-size pickup, and the new Venza crossover at No. 10.

    Detroit's Big Three automakers collectively have five vehicles in the top 10 spots, which is their lowest showing since Cars.com started the index in 2006 and was conducted twice a year initially.

    "This year was unique for our index, to say the least," said Patrick Olsen, editor of Cars.com. "The difficult sales environment and changes in cars' domestic-parts content -- both important factors in our index's equation -- played a huge role in how the rankings changed from last year."

    The results likely won't go over well in Detroit, said analyst Joe Phillippi of AutoTrends Consulting Inc. in Short Hills, N.J., but the more important point is that the vehicles and many of their parts are made in the U.S. and "we need all the payroll generation we can get."

    To its credit, Toyota has maintained its headcount in the U.S., Phillippi said. "There have not been wholesale firings and mass layoffs and they continue to employ a lot of people even in a downturn and their game plan is to continue to employ more."

    General Motors Corp. results were impacted because the methodology used excludes models slated to be discontinued that do not have a clear successor. That wipes out the Pontiac G6, for example, which has scored well in the past, but has fallen victim to GM downsizing. Also absent from the list this year is the Chevrolet Cobalt, which has fewer domestic parts and seen its sales fall off because it, too, is being discontinued. It will be replaced by the all-new Chevrolet Cruze next year.

    GM retains three vehicles in the top 10 with the Chevrolet Malibu taking the third spot and the Chevrolet Silverado (5th) and GMC Sierra 1500 pickup (8th).

    The Ford Taurus had the most domestic parts at 90 percent but landed 9th on the list, largely because the new Taurus is selling about 2,000 units a month compared with about 25,000 Camrys a month.

    Chrysler Group LLC has no vehicles in the top 10. The company's high-volume minivan is made in Canada.

    Phillippi said while the results may surprise some consumers, it likely will have little impact on buying decisions and he doubts many shoppers research domestic content. "These days, price and incentives are at the top of the list given the squeeze on peoples' budgets."

    The index provides some justification for consumers who have been loyal to imports, Phillippi said.

    Jim Hall, analyst with 2953 Analytics in Birmingham, called the claims "spurious" and questioned the math given that the index uses a parts count but does not go deeper and calculate the number of labor hours to make each part -- a figure that varies greatly with an engine being very labor-intensive, for example.

    In terms of validity, "it's like Michael Jackson saying he's the King of Pop," Hall said of the self-proclamation of the superstar and the Web site in its findings
     
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