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More Liberties will soon be taken away

Discussion in 'Politics, Elections & Legislation' started by bigdogtx, Mar 10, 2010.

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  1. bigdogtx

    bigdogtx Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    Elections have consequences,,,,"....Just 5 days from FUNDAMENTALLY changing this country...." Thanks libs/progressives/communists/socialists. I hope you enjoy the freedoms that you had before you drank the kool-aid....

    "Economic Policy 'Nudge' Gives Way to a 'Shove' By JONATHAN WEISMAN

    Bloomberg News

    White House adviser Austan Goolsbee, last month in Washington, D.C., advocates behavioral economics.
    .A little more than a year into its ascendancy at the White House, behavioral economics as a key policy-making tool may be on the wane.

    The opening weeks of the Obama administration were a coming-out party for economists who hold that incomplete information, subtle obstacles to participation and confusion tend to make people act in economically irrational ways. Economic policy can "nudge" people and institutions into more efficient, economically beneficial behavior without heavy-handed command-and-control measures in regulation and legislation, they argue.

    Cass Sunstein, co-author of the behaviorist bible, "Nudge," took up residence at the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, while behavioral economist Jeff Liebman is acting deputy director of the Office of Management and Budget. Yet another true believer, Austan Goolsbee, took a seat on the Council of Economic Advisers.

    At this time a year ago, the order of the day was disclosure, transparency and light-touch policy proposals, such as automatically enrolling workers into 401(k) plans and simplifying student-loan forms.

    But in recent weeks, President Barack Obama has proposed regulating health-insurance rate increases, separating commercial banking from investing on behalf of their own bottom lines, and prohibiting commercial banks from owning or investing in private-equity firms or hedge funds.

    Late last month, Vice President Joe Biden eschewed mere transparency requirements for investment advisers and announced new regulations that would require retirement counselors to base their advice on computer models that have been certified as independent. Otherwise, the advisers would be prohibited from suggesting that workers invest in funds they are affiliated with or receive commissions from. In short, "nudge" has come to shove.

    White House budget director Peter Orszag said administration economists haven't given up on behavioral economics. The president's budget for fiscal 2011 again proposes legislation to make it easier for employers to make 401(k) enrollment the default option, since workers tend to take the easiest path on such matters; when employees aren't automatically enrolled in 401(k) plans, many don't sign up.


    Work is almost complete on a simplified, online federal student-loan application that allows students to fill in income data from information the Internal Revenue Service has on file from tax returns with the click of a mouse. A study by H&R Block showed such advances could increase completion of student-aid applications by 30%. And late last year, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration began publishing the names of workplaces where deaths have occurred, with a link from the OSHA home page. Shame, the thinking goes, can be a powerful motivator.

    But some of the biggest proposals of last year have disappeared without a trace. When the White House turned last spring to financial-industry regulations, it pressed the concept of the "plain vanilla" financial product, believing that overworked, harried Americans do not read the fine print and compare the bewildering choices on offer. Credit-card companies could offer their array of sometimes-baffling products, but they also would have to offer a simple card with a fixed interest rate and unchanging penalty. Mortgage lenders wouldn't be prevented from selling adjustable-rate or interest-only mortgages, but they would always have to offer up a simple, 30-year fixed rate loan upfront.

    Those "plan vanilla" offerings aren't included in the financial-regulation legislation making its way through Congress.

    " 'Plain vanilla,' however, was a subjective term," said Steven Adamske, a spokesman for the House Financial Services Committee. A product the White House would consider stripped of its bells and whistles wasn't necessarily what others thought the term meant. It wasn't worth the fight, he said.

    Even some of the White House's biggest proponents of behaviorism say they have become more prescriptive, in part because they have found the limits of behavioral economics. When Mr. Obama rejected calls to limit executive pay, he believed excesses could be reined in through transparency. A public airing of salaries and compensation would shame corporations into trimming them back.

    So far, executives—especially on Wall Street—haven't been particularly influenced by the public outcry. Institutions, especially large corporations, don't behave the way they do because of incomplete information or subtle obstacles. They pay people to deal with such things.

    "Institutional decision-making is much closer to a rational economics than individual decision-making, no question," Mr. Orszag said.

    The president's proposal to regulate health-insurance rate increases was born of sheer frustration, one senior administration official said. After a year of debate on rising health-care costs, Anthem Blue Cross of California announced premium increases of as much as 39% last month, for example.


    White House economists say behavioral economics will continue to play a role in policy making, largely in regulatory matters and small-bore efforts. For instance, administration officials, frustrated that Americans aren't embracing simple, energy-efficiency changes, are looking at economic transactions where the person expected to make a purchase isn't the one who benefits.

    Landlords, for instance, have no incentive to replace a 40-year-old refrigerator if the tenants are paying the utility bills. So the Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Small Business Administration and the Energy Department are looking for ways to give property owners more incentives to save energy, possibly through loan discounts or guarantees offered through mortgage brokers. In October, Mr. Biden unveiled a pilot Property Assessed Clean Energy financing program to try it out.

    But grander economic policies will reflect more traditional Democratic economics—more push, less nudge.

    Write to Jonathan Weisman at jonathan.weisman@wsj.com"
     
  2. Bruce Specht

    Bruce Specht Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Near but not in chicago
    Soon an end will come to the rein of terror that is the Democarts. I don't want to ruch back to cold weather but there will be a new day next November.
    Keep the faith bigidtx.
     
  3. bigdogtx

    bigdogtx Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    10,650
    Bruce,

    I try, but when I look at what is happening to this great country that so MANY fought and died for and what is being done by those that just sat around and partied,,,,they do not know what they do....sad, very sad....
     
  4. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    25,238
    Location:
    Deplorable Bitter Clinger in Liberal La La Land
    The dems are probably bailing out because they don't want to get caught holding the bag when Great Depression II starts.

    We're already in the Great Recession. The Associated Press just officially labeled it as such.
     
  5. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    15,643
    Location:
    Green Bay Wisconsin
    As I stated last year, the second leg of the mortgage meltdown is on the verge of entering the room to devour what is left of the economy. Commercial mortgage default is rising quickly.

    A brief spate of consumption has led pundits to proclaim the recession over, without a basis in fact. The personal savings rate is lower than ever, and inflation is starting to rear its ugly head.

    If you are not now significantly invested in hard assets you should move immediately.

    The other shoe is about to drop.

    HM
     
  6. highflyer

    highflyer TS Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2006
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    2,474
    All it takes is one wicked generation to bring down everything. A few years ago that drugged out drop out generation took over control from the WWII generation. That rebellious selfish generation. The civil rights movement,followed by the anti-war movement, followed by the womens movement, followed by the gay rights movement, followed by the immigrants rights movement (still to come). They succeeded in dividing Americans and pitting us against each other. The generation that said they didn't care about money only cares about money. When you throw out God, family and country the only thing left is selfishness. This country has gone from a slow decline to falling off a cliff with the election of Obama and Pelosi.
     
  7. Savage99Stan

    Savage99Stan Active Member

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    Messages:
    1,081
    It is sad to be entering the "senior" years having had an unbelievable run of luck (never fired, worked up to pretty good jobs, paid off mortgages, vehicles, kids through college, married, nice grandkids, no drug/alcohol/legal problems)and now seeing what is left to our progeny. Both boys, thankfully, have decent jobs and they realize that they, their kids and on will be paying forever for the mistakes being made daily by our "leadership".

    Thankfully also, both are conservative, vote, and are raising their kids in a Christian environment. I hope we can effect change for the better.

    (Just paid for my fifth and final level in NRA...now past annual, life, endowment,patron and into benefactor. Not to brag. Just believe in putting some bucks where some effort can be expected on our behalf. Also ISRA, local clubs, and so on.)
     
  8. highflyer

    highflyer TS Member

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    2,474
    I have one daughter teaching school in an urban area. I also have temporary custody of 1 child from an alcoholic relative now in prison and his drug addicted wife now in prison. I had two of them but had to let one go because he refused to end his drug use. There are millions of these screwed up kids in our rotting society. I feel sorry for any young person now growing up in what will be left of our country after the baby boomers are all dead and gone. We were left the greatest country the world has ever seen but we have destroyed it.
     
  9. b12

    b12 Well-Known Member

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    3,049
    What the hell do you people expect. The 60's generations done this and continued to let it grow. Send your kids to McDonalds to eat because I don't have time. Wife works cause she burnt her bra.Give away everyone's eles money to soothe them while I keep mine. Equal pay for equal work. Yep just lower the pay down to what the other sex will dol it for.

    Now what are you going to do about it. Call you congressman, senator, local officals. What ever it take. But you probably won't do a damn thing.
     
  10. highflyer

    highflyer TS Member

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    Feb 1, 2006
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    2,474
    I'm going to go shooting for as long as I can. My escape from the madness is the outdoors which includes hunting, target shooting and fishing. I have a shoot Saturday then Sunday after church. I have already asked off for the opening week of turkey season. When I am in the outdoors everything is right.
     
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