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Modern Stocks - Wood or not?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by GrandpasArms, Sep 5, 2012.

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  1. GrandpasArms

    GrandpasArms TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    About 40 miles west of Chicago, IL
    I haven't kept up with newer guns and I'm questioning what is being used to make stocks these days. This question recently came to my mind again when I read the discussions about the new Beretta Prevail. One poster wrote, " The extra wood is dipped in a film to create the effect and then polyurethane. The extra grain is burned in."

    This suggests that the stock might be a plain wood that's dipped and engraved to simulate color, grain, and "feel". It might also mean the stock is made from something synthetic, then dipped and laser etched to achieve a simulation.

    Has this become common? When did it begin? Are customers happy about this? Do you think this helps or hurts sales?

    Personally, I'm not sure what I think about the situation of possible getting a painted or etched stock. It's a lot like finding out that the expensive mahogany dining room table is actually pressed fiber board with a 64th inch veneer.

    Larry
     
  2. b12

    b12 Well-Known Member

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    They charge out the yazoo for that fake stuff. Just look a Kregroff.
     
  3. Landshark

    Landshark Member

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    I wish they'd come up with a fiber-syn, etc stock that had the same density as wood, dip in a fancy grain finish and no worries about cracking.

    A friend's custom Kolar with $5000 wood cracked at the wrist. We both cried.
     
  4. skeet_man

    skeet_man Well-Known Member

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    The problem with wood is the higher the grade, and the more complex and intricate the grain, the more likely it is to crack.

    Except for cosmetics, wood is actually a very poor choice for gun stocks. Synthetics can be made so they are dimensionally stable, would never need to be refit from gun to gun, would not be prone to cracking, would shrug off scratches and dings better, and would be significantly cheaper. Synthetics could also be made in more extreme dimensions than a wood stock could. I wish Devault had gone further with the custom synthetic stocks he was offering a few years ago.
     
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