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Model 21 Winchester

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by eric, Jan 16, 2008.

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  1. eric

    eric TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Spokane, WA
    This forum is a wealth of information - perhaps someone can help answer my question. I have a possibility of purchasing a Winchester Model 21, three digit serial number, field gun in excellent condition. My question - does this early production gun have any negatives (or positives) that would affect its value?

    I would probably be re-stocking it to use as a bird hunting gun.

    Eric
     
  2. wm rike

    wm rike Member

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    Eric,
    I'll not consider myself an expert on the subject, but be aware that M21 serial numbers are not chronologically consecutive. They jump around quite a bit. Having said that, Winchester sold M21s in amazing numbers when they first came out. Best guess is that a triple-digit gun as pre-35, maybe pre-34. The early guns were mostly sold as field guns to be used as such. It hadn't yet become a classic or collector gun that required upgraded wood, vent rib, engraving and the like.
    The design of the M21 was evolutionary. The early guns had clunky buttstocks and a lot came with extractors, double triggers, and spinter fore ends. The early guns had a fore end release that protruded from the fore end and had a tendency to come loose when fired. All of these guns are on the lower rung, price-wise, but can represent an opportunity for someone looking for a durable working gun or the basis for custom work. It is doubtful that any restoration or custom work on these early guns will recoup your cost. If you are contemplating adding or replacing a beavertail fore end, note that the early versions did not have a for a brace to minimized splitting under recoil.
    Pick up a copy of Schwing's M21 book. It will lift some of the haze for you and from it you will be able to recognize some of the key features.
     
  3. ljutic73

    ljutic73 Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    Mine was a low 2000# 12ga single trigger, matte rib, selective ejector gun. I bought it as an unshootable relic and had the Winchester custom shop rebuild the machanicals and then I restocked it in English walnut. That was in 1979. It was a wonderful gun, great pointer and a joy to behold and I sold it finally in '06 when I needed to raise some cash. They are a great hunting gun!Maybe I'll run into another one some day that needs a little TLC.
     
  4. chrismhsc

    chrismhsc Member

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    Early 21s are in the 25% less than the later field gun with ae,sst, beavertail and better wood generally. A decent 40s or 50s 21 field 12 gauge is ballpark in the 4,500 range whereas an early 2 trigger,extractor, kind of ugly design stock with inferior forend latch will be in the 2,500 to 3,000.00 range. Cherrys fine guns recently sold one for, if I remember correctly, at an asking price of 2,900.00 and it was for sale for 3 months. Hope this helps. Chris
     
  5. eric

    eric TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    A little better description - solid rib, extractors, double triggers, splinter forend. Seller rates it at 99% origional and says the "Book Price" is over $6,000. He is asking $4250. Too much or?

    Eric
     
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could a model 21 come with beavertail and extractors