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Military Funeral, WOW!!!

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by trapshootin hippie, Feb 29, 2012.

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  1. trapshootin hippie

    trapshootin hippie Well-Known Member

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    Lost my uncle a few days ago and went to my first military funeral yesterday. He was a Bird Colonel from "the big one". My mothers sisters husband, lost him at 93. Although we were never really close, we all knew about his service while we were growing up.

    Let me tell ya something, if ya can go to one of those things ane listen the the gun salute and the lonesome sound of the horn blowing and watch the precision of the team in action and the folding and awarding of the flag, and still leave there without a tear in your eye, well you have never served. PLAIN AND SIMPLE

    GneJ
     
  2. bob easton

    bob easton TS Member

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    YES! They are impressive, and one of the least things we can do for people who risk so much protecting our liberty. I hope the one you attended had a live bugler. Not enough buglers are available for the funerals and too many are, sadly, honored with a tape recording. (Anyone wanting to help that situation should follow the link above.)

    Now, imagine that your military veteran is also a retired NYC police officer. I had the honor of attending one of those funerals a few years back. Services began at his parish some miles north of NYC. Once the funeral procession entered the 5 boroughs of NY, the roads in front of us cleared. The police knew our route and leap frogged all the way along the route, temporarily clearing sections of major highways for the entourage ... all the way out to the military cemetery on the middle of Long Island.

    God bless your uncle.
     
  3. cubancigar2000

    cubancigar2000 Well-Known Member

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    Been there done that, they are awesome, Semper Fi
     
  4. ctreay

    ctreay Member

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    For sure, for sure. I am on our Legion posts firing squad. We always have 2 live buglers (up front & echo)from the local high school with us. We usually have between 6 and 10 men on the line with our M-1's. We have had many,many complements on our performance.

    Edit: During the rifle salute each man fires three times. While the Flag is being folded our OIC has in his pocket three fired and polished rounds and these are inserted into the Flag as it is folded.

    ctreay
     
  5. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    Have been to a couple myself including my Father's in 1999. He was an Air Force Vietnam Vet. It gave me goosebumps ontop of my goosebumps and tears down both cheeks. If it doesn't choke you up, you are not breathing.
     
  6. Bvr Tail

    Bvr Tail Well-Known Member

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    I have attended several with full Military honors, including my Fathers, but the most remembered, was one where as they folded the flag to present to the family, they recited what each fold of the flag represents.

    This was very interesting to me and I never forgot it.
     
  7. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    I have also attended a Military Funeral where when the flag was folded it was a little off. The Officer in charge told the two soldiers to re-fold. Of course the service was very quiet and you could hear them clearly. After the Funeral I spoke with one of the soldiers and asked about the re-fold. He said it would have been re-folded until it was perfect in the eyes of the officer. I liked that. There is no half-ass in the way they do stuff.
     
  8. recurvyarcher

    recurvyarcher Well-Known Member

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    We just had one for Uncle Jess, and I have been to others. They are beautiful and so sad at the same time. I have not been to a LE or FD one yet, and if I had my choice there would be no more deaths or funerals.
     
  9. HC_John

    HC_John TS Member

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    Just hearing a gun salute or taps and I get tearied eyed.

    John MI
     
  10. teddy34

    teddy34 TS Member

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    Glad to hear you use high school buglars, ctreay. So many L:egion and VFW
    volunteers say they use tapes because they can't find buglers, when I mention
    I played for many funerals when I was in high school they don't believe kids
    would do that now, but admit they haven't tried. It was an honor for me
    and I think would be for many kids now. Every veteran deserves a real buglar.
    Gary Owen
     
  11. senior smoke

    senior smoke Well-Known Member

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    I went to my father's in 2003. He fought on Okinawa. It gave me chills as I was very proud of him.
    Steve Balistreri
     
  12. Jon Reitz

    Jon Reitz Well-Known Member

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    I’ve had the privilege of handing that cocked-hat flag to a spouse, and it is something very special. It really grabs you by the throat. The disappointing part now is that the person handing the flag can no longer say, "On behalf of the President of the United States and this grateful nation...". He has to say, "On behalf of the Secretary of Defense and this grateful nation...". That's just wrong, and if for no other reason than that no should ever vote for Barack Obama for anything again. He's a traitor in my eyes.

    Respectfully,

    CSM Jon Reitz (Ret)
     
  13. j2jake

    j2jake Well-Known Member

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    CSM, due to current protocall only Officers can speak on behalf of the CIC, us Senior NCOs speak for the SoD. Something I totally disagree with but not our choice. As a Bn Opns NCO one of my duties was to oversee the Funeral Detail when tasked to our Battalion. Much training went into the preperation for these cermonies. We always taught our soldiers to be proud and honored to be on the "Guard". When my turn comes I hope there is a proud and honored bugler present. Salute... 1SG Jake Jacobs,(Ret)
     
  14. blade819

    blade819 Well-Known Member

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    Walk around Arlington on a weekday and out of the 5 or 6 each day, maybe attend a General Officer. Spectacular. Pictures posted by me last December if you want to search.

    blade819
     
  15. Rastoff

    Rastoff Active Member

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    I've been to too many of these. Just reading about it chokes me up. It's no small thing to make the rank of Colonel. I'm grateful for your uncle's service.

    Thank you for posting it.



    Always remember, you can post here because of the deaths of millions of US soldiers.
     
  16. TrapRJohn

    TrapRJohn TS Member

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    Four years ago I got to watch my son (then thirteen years old) play Taps at my fathers funeral he taught himself how to play it for his Grandfather.
     
  17. AEP

    AEP Member

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    I just lost a friend of mine who was an officer in the Airforce dring WWII. I don't know the three persons the military sent but I think they were drunk. I could have played taps better than the person who played it. There dress was not the best. It looked like there chothes didn't fit and were worn. Maybe I shouldn't complain, but I feel anyone who was actually in combat and from WWII should receive the best. There's not to many of those guys left and they deserve respect. I was very disapointed.

    I have been to one other military funeral, another WWII vet who served under Patton, and that was impressive. Class all the way.

    Andy
     
  18. tudurgs

    tudurgs Member

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    As a post Honor Guard Commander in the late 60's I buried a lot of kids coming back from RVN. Tough duty. BTW, the bugler is always hidden from sight.
     
  19. amboy49

    amboy49 Well-Known Member

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    If you really want to show your respect look into joining the Patriot Guard in your area. Most ride motorcycles but it is not a requirement. At the family's request you will stand silently in a flag line at the funeral home and/or at the graveside during the funeral of any military veteran. Often the motorcycle riders will provide an escort from the funeral home to the graveside as well.

    I have had the privilege in participating in several funerals - the most impressive was for the most decorated Marine Corp veteran that was a native of Indiana. He saw combat in Korea and RVN. The turnout by his family and the Corp league was impressive . . . . but what was most impressive was the attendance by people who did not actually know him nor his family but chose to show up to pay their respects and give him the honor he was due.

    The Patriot Guard started in Michigan but I think they are now in most states.
     
  20. eightbore

    eightbore Well-Known Member

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    I served ninety days or a bit more in a First Army Honor Guard at Fort Lee, Virginia in 1968 and 1969. Our bus was on the road every weekend. We were very well trained, very well dressed, and enjoyed our duty. Our NCOs were very professional and we put on a very nice funeral. The families occasionally took us in if we were in a rural area without accommodations. We were always treated very well. We buried very few older veterans during that ninety days. We travelled with an E-6 NCOIC, an E-5, and at least six pallbearers.
     
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