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Military Bullets

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by nipper, Oct 3, 2008.

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  1. nipper

    nipper TS Member

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    Just watched the history channel and saw where the military is moving to a tungsten/nylon "green" bullet and away from lead

    Bill
     
  2. hoggy

    hoggy TS Member

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    Well that ought to raise the deficit some more.
     
  3. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    And most of the tungsten comes from the Chicoms. Real smart making your military dependent upon a metal controlled by a communist country.
     
  4. oz

    oz Active Member

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    What? no more depleted uranium? oz
     
  5. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Depleted uranium is used in large caliber shells, like those used by the 30mm cannon in the A-10 Warthog.
     
  6. Old Cowboy

    Old Cowboy Active Member

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    Was watching a TV show about gold last evening.........said a cube of solid gold just 14.2 inches square per side would weigh a ton. How would that compare with lead? Maybe if gold is that heavy it'd make a good substitute for lead?

    John C. Saubak
     
  7. recurvyarcher

    recurvyarcher Well-Known Member

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    Pure gold is close to pure lead in weight, although Bizmuth is the closest to lead as far as weight goes.

    Remember the Periodic Table from science in high school?
     
  8. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    Gold is denser than lead. Approximately 1200 pounds per cubic foot.

    Interestingly, Tungsten is almost exactly the same density as gold, at approximately 1200 pounds per cubic foot.

    Lead is approximately 700 pounds per cubic foot.

    For comparison, iron is approximately 500 pounds per cubic foot.
     
  9. recurvyarcher

    recurvyarcher Well-Known Member

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    A cubic foot is an awfully BIG BULLET...LOL!!!
     
  10. GARMASTERS

    GARMASTERS TS Member

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    Periodic Table???????? Is that when it OK to fool around?
     
  11. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    BTW, depleted uranium is also approximately 1200 pounds per cubic foot.
     
  12. Joe Potosky

    Joe Potosky Well-Known Member

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    Article - Jul 2001

    Army replaces lead bullets with less toxic tungsten

    In an effort to minimize soil contamination, the U.S. Army has begun replacing its traditional lead bullets with a more environmentally benign tungsten composite. Affected by this change are 5.56mm bullets used in M-16 rifles, which are issued to all Army infantry soldiers.

    The vast majority of bullets used by the Army are fired at training ranges, where the lead-based bullets contaminate the soil. In finding a replacement for lead bullets, the Army hoped to avoid another metal that could prove toxic, said Richard O'Donnell, mechanical engineer at the U.S. Army Environmental Center. Tungsten was chosen because it is one of the most benign metals.

    Because tungsten is more dense than lead, the Army mixed the metal with other materials to achieve the same performance level as lead. After evaluating 14 possible materials, developers determined that two tungsten composites, tungsten-tin and tungsten-nylon, had the closest density and performance to lead. The copper casing of the bullets will not change, but the lead core will be replaced.

    While the tungsten composite is currently more expensive to produce than the lead bullet, O'Donnell said it will be cheaper in the long run. The new bullets will save funds that would have to be spent removing the lead-based bullets from ranges in the future.

    So far, the tungsten composite has demonstrated the same levels of performance, effectiveness, and safety as the lead bullet it is replacing. The new composite bullets are already being used on training ranges in Alaska and Massachusetts, and the Army hopes to have completed the transition from lead to tungsten by 2005.

    The Army and the other U.S. military services also plan to eventually replace the 9mm pistol round, the 7.62 machine gun round, and the .50-caliber round with leadfree bullets, according to the Army Environmental Center's Environmental Update.

    Copyright Minerals, Metals & Materials Society Jul 2001
     
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