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Medal of Honor Show - PBS

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by BrowningGal, Nov 5, 2008.

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  1. BrowningGal

    BrowningGal TS Member

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    Are any of y'all watching this Medal of Honor show on PBS? It's amazing listening to the stories of these incredible soldiers.
     
  2. BrowningGal

    BrowningGal TS Member

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    A woman once won the medal of honor!! I never knew that. Wow!!!
     
  3. Dahaub

    Dahaub Active Member

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    Wow that's' a great story. I believe I've heard about it before and hearing it again is still a goose bump raiser to me. I'm sure there were others like him who never got any recognition at all. Sorry to hear of his passing. Dan
     
  4. pendennis

    pendennis Well-Known Member

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    I had the honor of being employed in the same building as SFC Walt Oehlers. He won the Medal of Honor after D-Day. He was so unassuming, that it wasnt't until I read a book in the library, and put his WWII picture with his current departmental photo. What a pleasure to have met and talked to him.

    Dennis
     
  5. Phil Kiner

    Phil Kiner Well-Known Member

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    KINER, HAROLD G.

    Rank and organization: Private, U.S. Army, Company F, 117th Infantry, 30th Infantry Division. Place and date: Near Palenberg, Germany, 2 October 1944. Entered service at: Enid, Okla. Birth: Aline, Okla. G.O. No.: 48, 23 June 1945. With 4 other men, he was leading in a frontal assault 2 October 1944, on a Siegfried Line pillbox near Palenberg, Germany. Machinegun fire from the strongly defended enemy position 25 yards away pinned down the attackers. The Germans threw hand grenades, 1 of which dropped between Pvt. Kiner and 2 other men. With no hesitation, Private Kiner hurled himself upon the grenade, smothering the explosion. By his gallant action and voluntary sacrifice of his own life, he saved his 2 comrades from serious injury or death.
     
  6. jbmi

    jbmi Well-Known Member

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    High school friend, his mother was one of my teachers.

    *YNTEMA, GORDON DOUGLAS

    Rank and organization: Sergeant, U.S. Army, Company D, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne). Place and date: Near Thong Binh, Republic of Vietnam, 16-18 January 1968. Entered service at: Detroit, Mich. Born: 26 June 1945, Bethesda, Md. Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life and above and beyond the call of duty. Sgt. Yntema, U.S. Army, distinguished himself while assigned to Detachment A-431, Company D. As part of a larger force of civilian irregulars from Camp Cai Cai, he accompanied 2 platoons to a blocking position east of the village of Thong Binh, where they became heavily engaged in a small-arms fire fight with the Viet Cong. Assuming control of the force when the Vietnamese commander was seriously wounded, he advanced his troops to within 50 meters of the enemy bunkers. After a fierce 30 minute fire fight, the enemy forced Sgt. Yntema to withdraw his men to a trench in order to afford them protection and still perform their assigned blocking mission. Under cover of machinegun fire, approximately 1 company of Viet Cong maneuvered into a position which pinned down the friendly platoons from 3 sides. A dwindling ammunition supply, coupled with a Viet Cong mortar barrage which inflicted heavy losses on the exposed friendly troops, caused many of the irregulars to withdraw. Seriously wounded and ordered to withdraw himself, Sgt. Yntema refused to leave his fallen comrades. Under withering small arms and machinegun fire, he carried the wounded Vietnamese commander and a mortally wounded American Special Forces advisor to a small gully 50 meters away in order to shield them from the enemy fire. Sgt. Yntema then continued to repulse the attacking Viet Cong attempting to overrun his position until, out of ammunition and surrounded, he was offered the opportunity to surrender. Refusing, Sgt. Yntema stood his ground, using his rifle as a club to fight the approximately 15 Viet Cong attempting his capture. His resistance was so fierce that the Viet Cong were forced to shoot in order to overcome him. Sgt. Yntema's personal bravery in the face of insurmountable odds and supreme self-sacrifice were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect the utmost credit upon himself, the 1st Special Forces, and the U.S. Army.
     
  7. SARGE75X

    SARGE75X Member

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    I had the Honor of working for and with MSGT Nicky L Bacon, he was my company 1SGT 411th MP Ft Hood,Tx. He received the CMH for actions in 1966 when he was with the 1st Infantry (Big Red One)RVN. I was still in contact with him until recently when my Email bounced back, he was head of Veterans affairs for the state of Arkansas. We always talked about fishing together but never got around to it but I did manage to drink quite a few beers with him. He was a soldier's soldier and when he met my father he acted like they were brothers, my Dad was Infantry WWII, SS,BS,CIB etc.
     
  8. RogerNRA

    RogerNRA TS Member

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    I have shook the hand of one, Joe Foss, at the NRA meeting in St Louis several years ago. Praise the Lord for men like these and all others who stood in harms way for all of us................Roger
     
  9. bigdogtx

    bigdogtx Well-Known Member

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    Respect to all who risked it all.

    I did not see the entire show, but the part I did see, it seemed like PBS really promoted and spent a lot of time on the gentleman who turned his back in. While he certainly had the right to do so, PBS seemed to romance it more than those like Sgt. York, who was a dissenter, but still did his service to his country.
     
  10. ivanhoe

    ivanhoe Well-Known Member

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    For those of you that find this subject interesting(if you don't shame on you)I have a few web address that pertain to related subjects. I find the one above very interesting as it accounts how the MOH recipient Flying Aces of WW I WW II and Korea performed to receive their MOH.

    http://www.history.army.mil/moh.html

    http://www.cmohs.org/medal/medal_types.htm

    http://www.homeofheroes.com/a_homepage/community.html

    Bob Lawless
     
  11. SARGE75X

    SARGE75X Member

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    Phil Kiner check your PM's, I sent a note about your relative that you might find interesting.

    -Bill Sanders
     
  12. Phil Kiner

    Phil Kiner Well-Known Member

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    He was my Uncle (kinda as he was gone before I was born).
    His brother Ernie Kiner is still alive and living in Aline, OK (my home town) and has possession of the MOH.
    My Dad Ray Kiner was killed in an oilfield accident the year before I started grade school. 1955
    Al three brothers fought in WW2 -Ray in the Navy, Ernie in the Air Force and Harold in the Army
     
  13. birdbuster

    birdbuster TS Member

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    Excellent show that should be a must-see. I really enjoyed it.
     
  14. whiz white

    whiz white Strong Supporter of Trapshooting Banned

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    It was touching...
     
  15. biff

    biff Active Member

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    Everytime President Truman put a MOH on a winner he always told them, "I'd rather have one of these than to be President!" I wish I could have seen this program as I'm reading a book by Larry Smith "Beyond Glory" which is about Medal Of Honor winners, a really good book. Since the Civil War there have been a little over 3400 persons to win the Medal and only about 140 from the three wars are still alive.

    One of the men still alive lives in Abilene, Texas named Lew Millet. Several people said he made Rambo look like Captain Kangroo, one hell of a soldier and hero!

    There were 24 soldiers at the Battle of the Little Big Horn of the 7th Calvary who won the Medal Of Honor! It's our Nations highest award and is usually won posthumously. Biff
     
  16. ivanhoe

    ivanhoe Well-Known Member

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    biff

    "There were 24 soldiers at the Battle of the Little Big Horn of the 7th Calvary who won the Medal Of Honor!"

    Also interesting to note that General George Armstrong Custer's brother Thomas Ward Custer was a double recipient of the MOH twice capturing the color of the enemy.

    Bob Lawless
     
  17. biff

    biff Active Member

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    Bob, George A. Custer was also quite a hero during the Civil War even though he never got the MOH like Tom did. Through his actions of disregarding his safety and successes, he earned several battlefield promotions all the way to Brevert General and was the youngest General in the Union Army. He had to take a reduction in rank in order to stay in the army after the war and was transferred to a Western assignment. He wrote an interesting book "My Life On The Plains" and did seem to have an understanding of why the Indians resisted having their lands taken.

    He was court martialed during this campaign for being AWOL by a commanding officer who didn't take to his personality and he also angered President Grant by revealing some imformation which exposed some under the table financial things which caused scandal during that administration. Custer had presidential ambition which fueled his need for success in battles against the Indian Tribes. When Custer was killed, he lost two brothers Tom(who was badly mutilated) and Boston(who would have survived had he stayed back with the pack train carrying supplies and ammo); also "Autie" Reed Custer's nephew who had been back with the pack train when word got back there about the impending action, so he and Boston rode to catch up with Custer's command and therefore perished. Custer's brother-in-law Major Calhoun was also killed. A lot has been written about Custer and the Little Big horn Battle, it always fascinated me when I was young. Biff
     
  18. ivanhoe

    ivanhoe Well-Known Member

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    Biff I have also read many of G.A. Custer's accomplishments in battle and the military in General. I might add that almost all of that eras military and western history hold Great interest for me.

    The statements made about Tom Custer was of particular interest. As in all the searching and reading I have done about the MOH. Multiple awards have only occurred 17 time in history. I found that and some other facts in MOH history quite interesting.

    Bob Lawless
     
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