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MEC 9000GN vs Spolar hydraulic

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by VNVET, Jan 15, 2010.

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  1. VNVET

    VNVET TS Member

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    I'm currently loading my trap loads on a MEC 9000GN with automate and I have a chance to buy a Spolar hydraulic. After looking at the video on the Spolar website it seems the hydraulics move slower than the MEC Automate. Considering the fact I have to hold down the buttons which ties up both hands until the top of the stroke, there is still no dead time. When the machine reaches the top of the stroke the gas cylinder pulls around the shell-plate, giving me time to reach for a wad and fresh hull, ready to insert both by the time the shell plate indexes. I've never timed my reloading so I don't know how many shells per hour, but I'm wondering if the Spolar would be any faster in terms of reloads per hour due to the fact it's foot operated? Anyone who has used both machines care to comment?

    Jim
  2. superxjeff

    superxjeff Active Member

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    Both will load more shells then you can shoot in a short period of time. I have owned both and if you want speed just get rid of the automate and put hydraulics on your Mec. I have a friend with a finger that will never be the same... he was loading fast when a wad hung up on the down stroke on his spolar. He didn't move quite fast enough. He doesn't talk about how fast he can load shells anymore. either press will load more shells then you can possibly shoot in one hour. If it's down to which press will turn out more shells in an hour your time is much more valuable then time spent reloading. Seriously... if you want speed just put the factory unit back on your loader and turn it up. I suspect it will load as fast as you can keep up with it. P>S A Spolar is better and faster. jeff
  3. rick979

    rick979 Active Member

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    What is the big rush?
  4. VNVET

    VNVET TS Member

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    Reloading is only mildly entertaining to me and in fact could be described as a chore that's why I use a progressive press instead of a 600 jr. Another question comes to mind and that is ease of changing machine adjustments. I reload both Nitro, STS, and Win HS hulls, some are 1 oz, some are 1 1/8 oz loads for caps. I use different powders, and wads for each load. With my MEC all that is required is changing the charge bar and bushing, adjusting the wad seating hight and I'm good to go. No adjustments are necessary with the crimps, all good. Takes me all of 5 minutes. How difficult to change around the Spolar when I need to change the wads and loads I've described.

    Jim
  5. LDAdd

    LDAdd TS Member

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    There is no doubt that the hydraulic Spolar is the Mercedes Benz of reloading machines. I don't own one but several of my friends do and they are a masterpice of engineering....as a matter of fact I was on the Spolar site just this morning and a full hydraulic setup is about $2700. Currently I own a MEC hydraulic and MEC Automate. It's like comparing an 1100 with a Kolar or K80; but one can buy three MEC hydraulics or Automates for the price of one Spolar. No contest in good construction, but functionality is similiar. For those of you still holding down two buttons on the Automate, I have constructed a rotating rod with "fingers" to depress the buttons, all hooked to a foot pedal. Too bad the loader doesn't operate a little faster because your two hands each have a little "down time" before the next hull and wad are needed. Both are still a hell of a lot of machine for the money. And oh yes, with two machines set up for 1 oz. and 1 1/8 oz., you don't have to change anything besides the stool you sit on. That's kind of convenient. Again, they're like comparing a very functional 870/1100 with a Kolar, K 80, or Perazzi.

    Life goes on...

    Larry
  6. Hoosier Daddy

    Hoosier Daddy TS Member

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    I can tell you this about a Mec 9000 Hydraulic. The harder you press the pedal the harder it mashes the finger. Don't ask me how I know.
  7. VNVET

    VNVET TS Member

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    TS DT10,
    Im duplicating the Nitro 27 load using a TGT12 wad and Titegroup powder with 1 1/8 shot, and since the Titegroup is very dense and the TGT12 wad is a 1oz wad and taller, this requires a significant lowering of the wad seating stem. If I remember correctly more than 1/4". Unless the Spolar uses a totally different wad seating system, I don't understand how the machine can compensate for that much difference. I also load the fig 8 1/18 oz wad using Int. Clays, and if I understand you correctly I would not have to make any adjustments to the Spolar when changing from one to the other in terms of wad seating.

    Jim
  8. VNVET

    VNVET TS Member

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    10/4 John,
    I know the MEC requires a change anytime a wad or powder is changed, or at least with the loads I'm using and that's easy to do with the MEC. I have no idea how easy that is with the Spolar. Looking at the picture of a Spolar, I can't really tell.

    Jim
  9. short shucker

    short shucker TS Member

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    VNVET,

    There is very little in the way of actual savings reloading shells unless you are reloading specific shells that are hard to obtain.

    I can buy STS's all day long for $75 a flat ($7.50 a box). A little less if I buy more than 10 flats at a time.

    I can sell the empties for 5 cents each or $1.25/box.

    This brings the cost of a box of shells down to $6.25.

    At todays prices for premium reloading componets a box of shells, that are equal to the Nitro 27 handicap, will run you about $5.00 a box give or take a little depending on the region you reside in.

    This takes in no consideration for time,travel,reloader,etc.

    If I could afford to buy a $2700 reloader and I didn't like to reload, I wouldn't be doing it.

    I have a 10' long bench with nothing but shotshell loaders fixed to it. I have (3) 366's and umpteen single stage loaders of Pacific/Bair manufacturer. The one that gets used the most is a Pacific 266 single stage.

    ss
  10. VNVET

    VNVET TS Member

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    Short-Shucker,,,It's clear to me that you feel I'm an idiot because I choose to reload and it's clear to me that you like Pacific single stage loaders. I've taken your advice under consideration and careful thought............and discarded it.

    Jim
  11. short shucker

    short shucker TS Member

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    VNVET,

    On the contrary, I don't think of anyone that reloads a safe quality shell as an idiot. And yes, there is a certain satisfaction that comes with breaking targets with a shell of ones manufacture.

    I, myself, have an incurable case of "tinkeritis" that is satisfied by fine tuning my loads and having factory quality crimps. I'm into quality, not quantity.

    I was just trying to give you justification to not reload and buy new shells. Nothing more was meant by my post.

    ss
  12. VNVET

    VNVET TS Member

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    short-shucker, Thats the problem with emails and forums.........easy to misunderstand the meaning of a post. All is well and I may have been a bit harsh. I have been reloading shotshells since 1974 and did enjoy it back then. Now it's just a chore, but I do load quality ammo. I try to buy components in quantity, only when I can find a good buy. When the price of lead went down last year I was able to buy a pallet of Lawrence when it was at it's lowest price ($23) I have over 25K of Win 209 primers and probably 50 lbs of powder, all bought at a good price. Every gun in my safe is worth more than I paid for it and if I buy the Spolar, I can sell it tomorrow for what I paid for it. If I keep it for 5 years, I can still sell it for what I paid for it because they just don't depreciate if you buy them used. My point is that I am well aware of the cost of reloading and shooting for that matter and my analysis has determined that reloading is a significant saving if you shop prudently and I will continue to do so. I can't imagine life without a shotgun.

    Jim
  13. shot410ga

    shot410ga TS Member

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    There is not compairson. Apples and oranges. Buy the Spolar if the price is right.
  14. VNVET

    VNVET TS Member

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    Today at our club I talked to a guy who has a Spoler and I'm jst about ready to pass on the Spolar due to the fact that the machine must be: Bolted down; and have a hole cut in the table for the shell to fall through. These are both "deal breakers" for me because I don't have a dedicated reloading table and no room for one in my shop. My MEC 9000 with automate sits on the corner of my shop table while I'm doing other things on the table, then moved into position when I'm ready to load. The Automate is heavy enough the machine does not have to be bolted down and is high enough I can put a empty target box under the chute to catch the shells. The Spolar sits so low this system would not work and Having a dedicated drawer or bucket to catch the shells is not very practical in my situation because of my multi-use work bench. I guess instead of buying a Cadillac for open road driving, I guess I'll stick with my truck which works fine on the county roads I usually drive. I'm old and change is hard.

    Jim
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