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Marinate with milk

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by mrd, Nov 12, 2009.

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  1. mrd

    mrd Member

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    Does anyone know how to marinate game, especially pheasants and game birds, with milk? How long and do you use regular or buttermilk, etc.
     
  2. Jim R

    Jim R Ljutic Nut TS Supporters

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    My wife does this all the time. Just cover it with either whole milk or buttermilk over night in the fridg and then before cooking drain and lightly rinse with water. My wife started doing this to take out some of the wild taste on ducks and geese so or kids would eat them. Now she does it to even venison and it is great.


    Jim
     
  3. miketmx

    miketmx Well-Known Member

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    It works great for pheasant which are pretty dry to begin with. We brown the cut up pheasant lightly in a frying pan and season and place the pieces in glass covered casserole with milk and cook in oven at 250 degrees for 45 minutes. This works for ducks as well but not for Canada goose they need more drastic measures.
     
  4. OldRemFan

    OldRemFan Member

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    If you haven't tried it yet, soak game birds AND fish overnight in the fridge in a glass or pyrex bowl in enough salt water to cover whatever you are soaking.
    Just put a tablespoon or two of table salt in quart or so of water. Works great on dove, quail, pheasants, prairie chickens, catfish, walleye, crappie, etc.
     
  5. Shooting Jack

    Shooting Jack Active Member

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    Rem, what purpose does it serve? How does it change the taste or flavor? Jackie B.
     
  6. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    A nice lady in ND shared that secret recipie with me. She said that the purpose of the milk soak is that the lactic acids help break down the meat making it more tender and masks a lot of the gamey taste. She would prefer to start with birds shot in the morning and soak them for 4 or 5 hours in the afternoon. Then she would brown cut up pieces in bacon fat and cover that with a heavy cream sauce and bake in a covered dish. The end product was wonderful.

    This is just what I remember about the recipie and there were also a few secret seasonings that went into the mix, I think paprika was one of them.
     
  7. gdbabin

    gdbabin TS Member

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    Remfan,


    I never thought "catfish, walleye, crappie" needed any help with fishy taste. A little salt and pepper, some cornmeal and a hot pot of good cooking oil is all I ever use. There are some other very dark fishy tasting species I avoid though.


    I could see it with very gamey fowl and beast.



    I'm with Jackie B, curious.


    Guy Babin
     
  8. 22hornet

    22hornet Well-Known Member

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    Buttermilk marinade works well with doves and waterfowl. Soak 'em overnight in the refrigerator.
     
  9. shannon391

    shannon391 Active Member

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    I heard coke or pepsi works too, is this true?
     
  10. OldRemFan

    OldRemFan Member

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    Jackie B:

    The salt water will remove quite a bit of any remaining blood from the meat, which in my opinion probably helps the taste. The meat will look lighter in game birds, and more white in fish. The brine will usually be some shade of pink the next morning after soaking overnight.

    This is what I grew up with. Back in the dust bowl days when I was a young kid, my folks were poor, and game birds, fish, rabbits, etc., were by necessity a part of our meat source. Mom always prepared any wild meat or fish in this manner. You might be pleasantly surprised if you try this method. It doesn't cost much and it's not labor intensive.

    Guy: If you like what you are doing with your fish, don't change, just enjoy what you are doing.
     
  11. ric3677

    ric3677 Well-Known Member

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    Oldremfan...EXACTLY!

    Rick in Mt.
     
  12. shannon391

    shannon391 Active Member

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    Salt water is the normal prep for fresh game but it does not marinade, flavor, or tenderize the meat much, cleans it good though.

    I soak ribs in a vinagar, brown sugar, orange juice,tomato and onion blend with good results.

    I know some ethnic guys that use it on goat when they barbeque one.

    A lot of guys think marinades mask the natural flavor of game but I think good ones enhance and make tough cuts tender. Best over hardwood fire.

    ( we used to have a rack in our wood stove at camp. We would cut back straps an inch thick, marinade then place over hot coals to medium rare. Tastes like high quality filet mignon.]
     
  13. letts

    letts TS Member

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    I use milk (skim is what we have, so that is what I use) for my deer meat. I like to use big pcs. like the football roast from the hind qtr. One hour is long enough. When I remove the meat form the milk I wash the milk off with water, dry the meat with paper towels and then salt and pepper, I cook the peice on the grill until it done no more than med. rare. Remove the meat from the grill and cut it into serving size peices. It tases like venison when cooked this way, not like coke, pepsi or salad dressing. One other thing In my opinon back strap does not need this as it is good just as it is with out help.



    Letts
     
  14. short shucker

    short shucker TS Member

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    OldRemFan,

    That's the way I grew up eating game as well. In fact, when I was young and had a family barbique the venison was gone long before the cow.

    shannon391,

    Getting it clean is what makes it so good. I don't want the flavors masked, just pure.

    The biggest travesty to any good piece of meat, is being overcooked. If I wanted to eat a dried out piece of leather, I have my boots.

    ss
     
  15. Mismost

    Mismost TS Member

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    shannon391....Coke is a good marinade...take a tough cheap brisket, stuff it in a plastic bag, pour in Coke to cover and let it sit for a day or two...I like a couple hours of smoke on them and then foil wrap and finish in the over, low and slow, 250 for 6 to 8 hours....I don't taste the Coke. Never tried it with game birds and I like fish to taste fishy.

    Vineager is a great tenderizer...white or cider for more flavor mixed with water, liquid smoke, Worchestershire sauce, and whatever spices you like...soak a tough deer roast in it.

    Orange juice, beer both work great on tough meat....just mix up a marinade that tastes good to you....give it some time to work.

    Soak a nasty smelling old wild boar hog in heavy salted ice and water for about 3 days and you'd swear it was store bought pork...the other white meat! Don't do it and I can't stand the smell of it cooking.

    Never could make a goose taste good no matter what I soaked in....the best was simply cut into small pieces roll in a mix of 1/2 flour and 1/2 Cayanne pepper...fry to a golden brown and drain on paper towels. Now eat the breading and throw the goose away! I quit shooting geese because I could make them fit to eat.
     
  16. shannon391

    shannon391 Active Member

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    I like corn fed venison fine plain, but someone needs to tell my deer that pine needles and sage brush don't make them taste so well.

    If you can hack some of the diver ducks we shoot without help you can eat anything.

    Goose makes great tasting kabobs or jerky.

    My aunt from the UP makes deer heart soup that is to die for.( I have watched her prepare hearts for hours soaking in salt water, cleaning and trimming}- My old aunt was half french half Itailan and spoke both very well, half her old family recipes are hand writtin in French-Itailan.

    She was hairy and short, but very warm hearted, always smiling and the best cook I ever met.
     
  17. short shucker

    short shucker TS Member

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    I always liked the Mulies that I shot around the Casper, WY area. There wasn't much there besides sage and grass. I liked the pronghorns as well.

    ss
     
  18. glenn mcleod

    glenn mcleod Member

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    My wife takes a boneless venison roast and browns it on the stove top then places it in a crock pot and covers it with diet coke and lets it cook all day. Very tender and tastes just like a beef roast. Also,it is very good as cold sandwich meat. Try it, you'll agree. Glenn
     
  19. sliverbulletexpress

    sliverbulletexpress TS Member

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    The thought of meat soaking in milk makes my stomach turn. If it's good meat or fish all it needs is salt and pepper and with fish some good fresh cornmeal, stone ground if you can. IF it's crappy meat put the liquid smoke to it. LOL
     
  20. scorpman

    scorpman Member

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    I have been thinking if using milk would help Canada goose breasts any. I have not eaten any yet myself but have heard many people say they don't taste good. One guy I know marinades them in apricot brandy and says he makes a good meal from them. My idea would be to grind them up and make a chili from them - I figure enough seasoning and hot peppers and you might make it edible. Anyone try this yet? How did it turn out?
     
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