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Making amagazine weight

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Mike K P, Jul 3, 2009.

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  1. Mike K P

    Mike K P Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    468
    I want to add weight to my 16 ga. model 12 magazine. I know there are a lot of do it yourself ways but is there anyone here who could machine a nice round piece of steel the dia. of a sixteen gauge shell? Thanks, Mike.
     
  2. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    9,413
    I take a piece of 2 x 4 wood and a spade drill bit of the proper diameter and drill a couple of holes 2 or 3 inches in length. Melt some lead and fill the holes. After it cools I knock the lead cylinders out and clean them up on a lathe. They make very good magazine weights. You can also put one in the buttstock too if you want to keep the balance of the gun the same. HMB
     
  3. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    5,475
    Location:
    Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania
    Any machine shop should be able to make what you're looking for but also try scrap yards. Their non-ferrous areas probably receive pieces of machined copper and brass that would also work while adding the benefits of being corrosion-resistant amd heavier than steel per inch. Among the many "trophies" I've scrounged out of other companies' junk that has been brought in to my buying station is a one-inch diameter piece of machined aluminum bar stock about a foot long that makes a dandy scope mounting tool - it will turn the front ring into its dovetailed base easily and, if the rear ring is attached to it while the front ring is being installed, bring both rings into perfect alignment at the same time.

    I made a stock weight for a friend out of copper tubing with melted lead poured into it (both materials came out of our scrap bins) and numerous other gadgets and gizmos. The best thing is the cost - you're buying scrap, remember, and that doesn't have to mean dirty and rusted. But it does mean cheap.

    Ed
     
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