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low light problems

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by slayer, Jul 23, 2009.

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  1. slayer

    slayer Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    beautiful northern michigan
    I shoot on a bi-weekly evening league here in MI. When the light starts to diminish, my scores do the same. This is even before it is dark enough to turn on the lights, and it doesn't get any better when the lights are on. I seem to be seeing the clays just fine, but can't seem to break them anywhere near as well as when it's sunny. Does anyone out there have similar problems? Any suggestions? I wear very light yellow prescription glasses. thanks Bill in Michigan
     
  2. V10

    V10 Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Mojave Desert
    Bill,

    You might want to pick up some lens that are a little closer to "clear." Something along the lines of the Decot 10% gold tint. These are just barely tinted.

    Then, raise your eye-hold point. You want to use your eye's rods, rather than the cones. Have you ever done the experiment where, in low light, if you look a little away from the object you want to see, you can see it better? That property is what you want to take advantage of.

    Most people, when the light level drops, move their eye-hold closer to the house. This is in the belief that you want to see the target sooner. Well, if it looks streaky in broad daylight it isn't going to be less streaky in low light.

    So, look for the target a bit further out than you normally would. I think you'll find that you actually pick it up faster and your scores should come back up to normal.
     
  3. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    To shoot well we must see the target clearly. This requires light. The worst time to shoot is as dusk when the field lights don't help much and the Sun is too low to give much light.

    Pat Ireland
     
  4. andybull

    andybull Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2008
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    885
    Location:
    South Carolina
    Years ago, a good friend of mine (much older than I) would say "who turned out the lights", as a cloud came over us as we shot trap. I would look at him and smile, never really knowing what he was talking about. Many years later, I know exactly what he meant.

    Ten years ago or so, I began having problems identifying pigeons as they catapulted from their boxes, I was very upset and almost quit shooting the sport. I wore yellow lenses one cloudy day and walla! the birds started dropping when I shot at them.

    Moral to the story is get your eyes checked and try lighter shooting lenses, you will do much better.
     
  5. slayer

    slayer Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    beautiful northern michigan
    thanks so much for the input guys. I think I will try to arrange to practice as much as i can in the conditions that i mentioned. The hold point change is also something that I will definitely work on. I take a much lower hold point than most of the other shoters as it is. It worked o.k. when I was younger and the eyes and reflexes were better. Time to adjust probably.
    Bill in MI
     
  6. OldGoat

    OldGoat Well-Known Member

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    Use clear lenses! (prescription or non) but make sure you get the non-reflective coating on the lenses to let in the maximum amount of light. It works...best regards, Ed
     
  7. ivanhoe

    ivanhoe Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
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    Location:
    Oxford MA
    A few years back I was involved in evening leagues in the winter it didn't seem to matter because the light were on when the shooting started. However in the summer the lights usually weren't on until the light started to fade and did no good until full dark.

    In my area there is a vendor of eye glasses he doesn't do exams he just make glasses to your prescription or in the case of shooting class your specifications. I bought shooting lenses for my glasses in clear RX and he said bring me your current lenses and I will have what ever you want made and then cut the notches in them myself.

    The clear lens did it for me I didn't think it would make that much difference but it did and my score under the light improved also before full dark and after,

    Bob Lawless
     
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