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LOP question

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Jawhawker, Nov 1, 2009.

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  1. Jawhawker

    Jawhawker TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,734
    Start with one inch between thumb and nose. Then tweek it from there. You want it long enough to allow a smooth swing and stay in the gun but short enough to allow swing through angles without hinderance.
     
  2. Phil Kiner

    Phil Kiner Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,211
    How long is your LOP?
    How tall are you?
    How long are your arms? (sleeve length)
    Long or short neck??
    Crawl the stock or head up?
    Do you have trouble swinging to an angle from the 16?
    How far your nose is from the point of the comb is not the most important thing to worry about.
     
  3. Rollin Oswald

    Rollin Oswald Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,313
    Location:
    Brillion, WI
    The goal is to have the correct LOP when using a correct shooting form (stance, gun mount and body posture) - an upright body posture and a natural and upright head and neck posture.

    As Phil implies, a number of things affect the distance between the nose and thumb (1.25" - 1.5") besides the actual LOP of a stock. The stance used affects the nose/thumb separation - an obliquue stance requires a longer LOP for the separation than facing targets more directly.

    The height of the gun mount also affects a correct LOP - low mounts require a longer stock because the neck has to lean farther forward to place the cheek on the comb.

    Neck length also affects the correct LOP. A longer neck when accompanied by a stock without an adequate drop at the heel dimension requires a longer LOP because the neck must be leaned forward to place the cheek on the comb.

    The correct pitch on a stock can also affect the nost/thunb separation. Length is required to prevent the nose and thumb meeting during recoil. When the toe of the recoil pad sticks out too far, a longer stock will be needed. The extra length is needed because the toe of the pad will bury in the shoulder during recoil and the extra length prevents the thumb mashing the nose.

    A stock that is too long retards smooth lateral swings, promotes gun mounts too far out on the shoulder and can cause the comb to move away from the cheek on swings toward the side of the gun mount. This of course, causes a change in the POI.

    Rollin
     
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