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LOP Question

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Hawk46, Jan 13, 2011.

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  1. Hawk46

    Hawk46 TS Member

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    Jan 7, 2011
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    Is there a ballpark way to estimate the proper LOP when buying a non-adjustable trap gun off the web? My sleeve length is 35", glove size XL. Maybe someone out there is the same?
     
  2. BudsterXT

    BudsterXT Member

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2010
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    Are you left handed or right handed?

    Just go to a trap club, ask for some help, and shoot some birds..

    I have found out that almost everyone at a trap club will help you and give you some advice.

    You may have to sort it out, but you will be able to judge the advice as you get it.

    Kenny Uhlbeck
     
  3. wireguy

    wireguy TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
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    3,715
    Everyone is knit together differently. Some tall people like short LOP, some long. I'm 6'2" and started out very comfortable at 14" and now 15 years later I shoot about 15". There is no ballpark estimate because you are a unique individual.
     
  4. g7777777

    g7777777 TS Supporters TS Supporters

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    9,354
    No in fact tall people often need very shot lenght of pull if they have a short neck

    The neck length is the most important measurement

    LOP however is not very important unless it is way too short (you hit your nose when you shoot) or way too long (you head is pulled off of or moves on the stock when you shoot) most people have about a 1 to 1 1/2 inch range there

    mounting a gun in a static position tells little if anything because you will try to adjust your body to the stock-- all that goes out the window when you move and shoot in a dynamic way-- dynamic movement

    Regards from Iowa

    Gene
     
  5. 635 G

    635 G Well-Known Member

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    Another factor in LOP, is rib height & roll over comb. Furthermore, do you bring the gun up to your face or do you creep fwd on the comb like a lot of international shooters do.

    Find a good gun fitter, not all gun salesmen are fitters.

    Phil Berkowitz
     
  6. 635 G

    635 G Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2008
    Messages:
    6,222
    Another factor in LOP, is rib height & roll over comb. Furthermore, do you bring the gun up to your face or do you creep fwd on the comb like a lot of international shooters do.

    Find a good gun fitter, not all gun salesmen are fitters.

    Phil Berkowitz
     
  7. 635 G

    635 G Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2008
    Messages:
    6,222
    Another factor in LOP, is rib height & roll over comb. Furthermore, do you bring the gun up to your face or do you creep fwd on the comb like a lot of international shooters do.

    Find a good gun fitter, not all gun salesmen are fitters.

    Phil Berkowitz
     
  8. Ted K.

    Ted K. Member

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2009
    Messages:
    507
    Location:
    Tiburon, CA
    Try a couple of shotguns at your club and see what LOP suits you. This can be particularly helpful if you can find a gun with an adjustable stock that the owner will let you adjust. It's even more helpful if the gun you try is the same make and model as the one you want to buy.

    Hopefully, you'll find two or three guns with the same or similar LOP that feel good to you. Now compare that LOP to the LOP on the gun you want to buy. If the LOP on the gun you want to buy is close to the LOP you like, you can figure that you can adjust the LOP of the new gun to suit you after you shoot it for a while.

    Yes, I understand that the gun you are looking at doesn't have an adjustable LOP, but, assuming the LOP of the new gun is relatively close to what you think you like, you can adjust it anyway by changing the thickness of the recoil pad, adding a black plastic shim or even by cutting off a small amount from the butt of the stock. The trick is to get a gun with a stock that is relatively close to the length that suits you. Also, a gun that's too long is easier to adjust this way than one that's too short - it's easier to cut wood off than to shape and add shims, etc.

    Keep in mind that as you shoot the new gun, your LOP preference may change. So getting it "spot on" at the beginning probably won't get you home free anyway.

    Ted K.
     
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