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LOP Measurement

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Franktri, Jul 23, 2013.

  1. Franktri

    Franktri Member

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    Mar 30, 2009
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    I have read in many places that LOP can be measured from crutch of the arm to the trigger finger. I have found that that measurement doesn't really match up with the actual mounting of the gun and judging th LOP based on the distance from the knuckle to the cheek. Any comments?
     
  2. Neil Winston

    Neil Winston Well-Known Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
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    My comment is that you have discovered shotgun myth #10,008. Of course it doesn't work except in the sense that most shooters are adult males and often pretty-much shaped the same. In determining what length of pull works for individual shooters, it's useless.

    But then, there's so little useful gun-fitting info a shooter can find (Exception above) it will work for most shooters but then 14.5 inches will too.

    Neil
     
  3. JACK

    JACK Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    I use the elbow to trigger method all the time... But only as a tape measure substitute.
     
  4. Ajax

    Ajax Well-Known Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
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    On my talley it shows up as #10,007 but you may have kept better track. LOL

    Ajax
     
  5. Rollin Oswald

    Rollin Oswald Active Member

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    Location:
    Brillion, WI
    the reason that it doesn't work is that it ignores several things that affect the correct LOP (length of pull). It ignores the height of the gun mount, which affects the need to lean the neck forward to put the cheek on the comb. Coupled with that, is the length of the shooter's neck in addition to the stock dimension called the "drop at the heel, which describes the distance of the top (heel) of the recoil pad below the level of the rib. Together, they affect the need to lean the neck forward and any forward lean requires additional stock length to keep the nose away from the trigger-hand thumb during recoil.

    Lower-arm length as an LOP indicator also ignores now the shooter stands when shooting. Standing with the shoulders closely aligned with the direction of the shot (like a rifle shooter) requires a longer stock than will shooting with the body facing targets more directly.

    Rollin