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looking for help ..Weatherby 300 mag

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by vdt, Jan 13, 2012.

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  1. vdt

    vdt Active Member

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    i would like to build the most accurate load for this rifle ,i will be using Barnes Triple Shock 168 BT bullets ,now i have been told if i was to move that bullets in the case i could achieve more accuracy ,is there a reloading book that walks you threw the method ,would like some help..thank you
     
  2. g7777777

    g7777777 TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    It is trial and error- which rifle are you shooting it out of and what is the accuracy you are getting with that load?

    Gene
     
  3. Auctioneer

    Auctioneer Well-Known Member

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    If you don't have the tools to set the bullet in the case then load up some dummy rounds so they are longer then you think they should be. Load one in the rifle and it will push the bullet deeper in the shell. Then you have an idea on Max depth. Back off just a shade and you will be close to what you need to know for setting the bullet.

    You have already picked out your bullet. Now go through the reloading books and either get out what powder you have on hand and go out and get the other powder you will need.

    I will look in the book and look up the low load and high load with that bullet weight and powder. I will weigh each load per shell. I will load 5 low and 5 high loads per powder. Put those in a bag or a box with it written on paper so you know what is what. This will take some time at the range because of the barrel heating up. Keep only one load on the bench at a time so you know what your shooting. When you shoot the target go and write down what load you just shot on that target. On the target board I will cover the whole board because where is the shot going to go on the target. It may not be on the target itself but around it. I have seen that before.

    I have seen guns that liked a slower load and others like the hot loads. I have seen a rifle shot spread 5 shots from 12 high to 6 low and then with another load have all touching. The rifle told me what it wanted.

    I also have one scope for just testing out a rifle that I first sent back to the factory and had them go over it. That way you know the scope is 100% correct. I also try to shoot early morning because of heat and wind.

    Good luck and let us know how you do.
     
  4. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    The Weatherby rifles all have an excessive free-bore (this is what lets them be loaded to higher pressures), so the idea of placing the bullet out to the point where it touches the lands just won't cut it.

    Plus, 168 grain bullet is a very small (short) bullet for the 300 W/M (relatively).

    The idea of altering the overall length of the cartridge is a good one. Find a load the gun "likes," then to dial it in load that exact profile altering the bullet depth by a fixed increment (0.005, 0.010, etc.) - keeping everything else the same. You will spend a long day at the range in that you want the rifle to cool fully between groups.

    Further, you will want to uniform the primer pockets and flash holes, neck turn the cases, and after firing once in your rifle, trim the cases to a uniform length. You might want to learn about neck sizing only if you will be shooting the rounds from the same rifle always.

    A lot of time spent, but I turned a Sako TRG-S in 300 W/M that shot about 0.75" at 100 yards into one that shoots 0.5" at 300 yards (if I do my part).

    It can be worth the effort.

    As an FYI bullet seating to the lands in 'normal' rifles is actually easy. Take a shell and make two vertical cuts from the mouth of the case heading towards the base - a Dremel is great for this - just cut across the mouth to give two slits opposite from one another.

    Now squeeze the walls of the mouth together - the slits will let them move in towards one another.

    Place a bullet in the mouth as far out as you can and gently close the bolt of the rifle on this dummy round (I set a spent primer backwards in the pocket to remind me it is a unique shell).

    Open the bolt and gently remove the shell (sometimes the bullet will hang on the lands and only the shell will come out - keep a cleaning rod handy). When you get the whole shell out you now know the exact length of your chamber relative to that bullet.
     
  5. skeezix

    skeezix Member

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    One thing to keep in mind is the magazine. I had a .300 winnie once upon a time that shot real nice groups - but the best length was about 1/16" longer than the magazine would hold.

    Really good thing to find out opening morning 30 miles by horse from the jump off point.
     
  6. Chichay

    Chichay TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    vdt,

    Barnes Reloading Manual #3 suggests you focus on XMR3100, RL22, and IMR4831 powders to get optimum accuracy when using their 168-gr XLC BT bullet. You may want to call or e-mail Barnes at 800-574-9200, or email@barnesbullets.com.

    Chichay
     
  7. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Banned User Banned

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    Personally, I would think about a 190 gr Boat Tail bullet in this round.

    As was said, seating just off the lands is not going to happen in a Weatherby rifle.

    Load to the longest length that will work in the mag. RL-25, IMR 7828, or H-1000 will work. Make sure to use the Federal 215 primer.

    The power this round has with heavy boat tail bullets past 350 yards will amaze you.

    Don't be seduced by the high muzzle velocity of the lighter bullets. Guns in this class are made for shots approaching 1/4 mile. THAT is where these guns live. The heavier boat tail bullets will have a lot more power at the ranges this gun is made for.
     
  8. skeezix

    skeezix Member

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    I also agree with the heavier is better. Better bullet integrity, better wind behavior, just better. I also use a 200 gr. nosler partition in my .300 winnies. 3.5" high at 100 yds.

    There are a lot of much fancier and expensive bullets out there, but I like the partitons.
     
  9. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Banned User Banned

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    I also like the NP bullets, but they cannot match the ballistic coefficient of the 190 gr Hornady BTSP.

    If you can get this bullet out of the muzzle at near 3200 fps, you have a beast at 450 yards.
     
  10. cnsane

    cnsane Member

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    Ummm,,,,The rifle picks the bullet, you just pick the appx. bullet weight. 30 cal Weatherbys are made for very heavy bullets. 30 cal. shorts (308) are for light bullets.
     
  11. DB Bill

    DB Bill Active Member

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    Remebering of course that having a belted case it's the case that determines headspace, not the shoulder.
     
  12. g7777777

    g7777777 TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    No one mentioned what you should be getting- if you get 1.5 inches (using a Gooooooood scope and that hunting rifle at 100 yards you are doing well--- if you get better than that you are doing better than well.

    As pointed above- different rifles do different things with different bullets and the bullet is only one component

    So pick a bullet you like (for downrange performance/trajectory etc) and work on the powde, velocity combination that shoots best

    Now on the rifle itself- if you have shot all your life and studied this stuff and read about it- you know that one of the cheapest ways to make the largest improvement in accuracy is to recrown a rifle

    Anyway- there are all sorts of other stuff like the bedding - and make sure the action screws are tight. Bedding used to be much more important in the past but new materials or new quality control and free floating rifle barrels make it less of a variable now than it used to be

    Make sure your scope is as good as you can afford- a poor scope- you cant even differentiate the target to shoot good groups

    Regards from Iowa

    Gene
     
  13. Kemper

    Kemper Active Member

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    What HSLDS said is true for the Weatherby, I've loaded all my life and my 257 WM will not shoot better than factory loads, speciically because they are designed to let the bullet jump as stated above.

    Buy factory loads, they will treat you best with the Weatherby. BTW, the Weatherby is the only rifle I will say this about, most factory ammo is worse than junk.
     
  14. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    HSLDS is on the money. Reread his post and pay attention to the freebore statement.

    Ol' Roy got his velocity by letting the bullet jump a little before engaging the rifling.

    If you move the bullet forward without reducing the load you will get a nice increase in pressure which you probably will not like.

    7828 or Reloder 25 will get you the best results. I use 7828 exclusively in WBY.

    HM
     
  15. John55

    John55 Active Member

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    You will likely be better off just starting at the Weatherby factory load length and going a bit longer or shorter until you find the sweet spot. With the free bore Weatherby uses I doubt any standard rifle's magazine would accommodate a cartridge loaded to just clear the lands! And as previously noted, the load data is designed for the bullet to have some clearance before hitting the rifling. Not allowing this to happen will mandate down loading the ammo to keep pressures from running sky high.
    I use a lot of the 168gr TTSXs in my 300Wby and they shoot great, but so do all of the TTSXs. We have found the 180gr version just as accurate and once my supply of the 168s runs out I will just stay with the 180s and be happy. I tried a number of powders but have always found IMR7828 to give me the best accuracy and velocity.
     
  16. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    I use a lot of Berger bullets. Walt Berger recommends seating his bullets against the rifling for best accuracy but I've never been able to bring myself to do that.

    My unscientific method is like Auctioneer's. I use a dummy round to find my rifle's maximum overall cartridge length and then turn the die's seating stem down a quarter-turn. Next, I see if that length will fit in the magazine. If so, I load some test rounds at that length with different powders. Once I find the best powder, I try different seating depths until I find what works best. If the dummy round won't fit in the magazine, I shorten it until it will and then play with powders and depth from there.

    I only have one rifle I can't use Bergers in. They are very long in any given weight and when seated deeply enough to fit in the magazine of my 7mm RUM, there isn't much bearing surface inside the case neck and the bullet intrudes upon the powder capacity. With just one exception, my .260, all the rifles I can use them in shoot them very well.

    Ed
     
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