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Looking at used 1100's Have questions!!

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Dan S., May 2, 2007.

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  1. Dan S.

    Dan S. TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
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    I am looking at a few used 1100 Remingtons at a local large gun store. All are around $350 sticker. My main question is of the 6 or so he has, only one is a trap model (receiver) the others are field grade. I am looking for a gun for a youth to shoot so looks are not important, function is. The trap model is fixed choke with minor pitting on the receiver and barrel. I happen to have a new 1100 barrel with choke tubes that I would like to put on it for field, skeet, sporting, etc. Are there any interchangability problems with barrels and what do I look for? Dan
     
  2. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Deplorable Bitter Clinger in Liberal La La Land
    The only interchangability problem is with putting a magnum barrel on a non-magnum receiver, then shooting 3" magnums through it. The bolt will cycle too fast and eventually can cause damage.<br>
    <br>
    You can put non-magnum barrels, including trap barrels, on a magnum receiver. In fact, putting a trap barrel on a magnum action makes one of the softest shooting 1100 combinations. The main difference is that the magnum has a heavier action sleeve (the large cylinder that wraps around the mag tube).<br>
    <br>
    Some very early non-magnum receivers are supposed to have dimensional differences and won't take a magnum barrel. We're talking early to mid 1960's. The ejection port is said to be shorter and the trigger group is said to be different. I have not personally seen these differences. Remington now makes a special barrel for 3" steel shot that retrofits 2-3/4" 1100's, and makes no mention of any 1100's it won't retrofit on to.
     
  3. gbatch

    gbatch TS Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    259
    Dan:
    If you send me your email, I will email you a compilation of some threads I collected on 1100s which you may find useful.

    Gene Batchelar
    Wheaton,IL

    My email is XXgbatch@comcast.netXX (Delete the Xs)
     
  4. jimx200

    jimx200 Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
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    Barrel/receiver cracks common problems? I've shot the crap out of my 1100's over the last 40 years and have never had or seen one with a cracked receiver or barrel. I'm not saying it does not happen, it's just that I have never know someone (self included) that have had these problems. Most experienced shooters believe the 1100 Rems to be the most reliable semi-auto ever made (ok,you Super X lovers, you're included too).
     
  5. ol 12 shooter

    ol 12 shooter TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2007
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    126
    jimx200,

    They do crack right at the back end of the bolt slide, I know of 3 already and 1 was just sent back for replacement. Also while were on the subject, the rear of the bolt carries a plastic fitting and they also self-destruct with the use of heavy trap loads, replaced a few of them also.

    ol 12
     
  6. Steve-CT

    Steve-CT TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    524
    The barrel extensions crack first, then the receiver cracks.

    I know. I've done both over 25 years and 250,000 to 300,000 rounds through 1100s

    Check the barrel first, around the locking lug recess. They crack for two reasons:

    1. Excess wear in the recess area allowing the locking lug to "hammer" the extension upon closing (this is why you need the "L" marked locking lug after
    100,000 rds or so)

    2. Allowing the forend cap to loosen which permits increased vibrations and metal to metal contact of the external surface of the barrel extension against the underside of the receiver top. (Smearing grease on the top, external surface of the barrel extension provides an impact cushion to some extent) I've been doing this now to a 1960s made "9526" bbl (30" full without step rib)
    for over ten years and there is barely even a sign of bluing wear on the extension which means the barrel extension is not contacting the metal and wearing the bluing down.

    Also check the inside receiver rails visually. If they are worn too thin, service life may be nearing an end and also, you increase the likelihood you will break links more frequently as there will be more "wiggle room" for the front end of the link - and when it bears the load of the bolt and action bar coming back, it can stress the link more if it "shifts" riding inside the rails.

    Check the field guns and don't presume the trap receiver is better. Many of the trap gun receivers look good externally, because shooters handled them by the wood and always wiped them down with oil, but chances are - the field guns have seen one tenth as much use but may have been carried more and thus, look
    not as nice.
     
  7. Dan S.

    Dan S. TS Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
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    Thanks for all the info guys. This is what I needed to help me sort through all these issues. Gene...you have mail.

    D
     
  8. bigbore613

    bigbore613 Active Member

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    4,469
    If you look straight into the ejection port there is a protruding dowel near the front that locates the barrel. If it is missing the barrel can move around and cause the reciever to crack at the front.I have personally repaired 2 and welded one reciever that cracked. Jeff
     
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