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Locktime 3200 vs. 90T

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by buck3200, Mar 18, 2010.

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  1. buck3200

    buck3200 Well-Known Member

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    It would seem I'm not the LONE RANGER when it comes to switching between these two. All of you with experience at this,what can one expect going from 3200 to 90T?? Will it seem like a Flintlock or be unoticable?
     
  2. Maytag

    Maytag TS Member

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    I have shot them both a lot, and feel it will be hard to tell the difference. Splitting hairs on these two.
     
  3. BILL GRILL

    BILL GRILL Well-Known Member

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    I shoot them both, notice no difference. Bill
     
  4. shooter99

    shooter99 Well-Known Member

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    Reprint of an earlier post.


    Subject: Lock time of popular trap guns
    From: Dennis DeVault
    Email:
    Date: 06-Apr-09

    Yes I have checked the lock time of a Remington 3200 and it checked at 2 milliseconds. The 3200 was the fastest production arc hammer gun that was ever made. The only way we have acheived faster lock times is with the in-line plunger that is foumd on the Infinity, MachOne, Seitz, and Bowen. I have not checked the Browning Cynergy. My machine is down at the factory being updated so that I can now use windows and we will be able to check set weight and release pressure with the new software. This machine that we have measures different areas of a trigger, lock time, the travel distance until the sears let go, pounds of pull required to start the trigger moving, peak pull poundage, and overtravel. It has helped me in gun design and to learn the dynamics of a shotgun, but I will say again the most important factor for all this is consistancy from shot to shot. I have shot with Drew Waller for several years and he is by far the most critical person that I have met when it comes to triggers. If the trigger he is shooting starts to change in his Perazzi on the next trap it is out of the gun the next rebuilt trigger is in the gun for the next field. The better shooters that I have had dealings with with know when their trigger goes bad and do not hesitate to make a change. Thank you,

    Dennis DeVault
     
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