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LOCK time

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by rob111, Nov 4, 2010.

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  1. rob111

    rob111 Member

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    A while back Dennis DeVault did a study on lock time of a few guns , i cant find it .. what are the guns with the fastest lock times.. Respectfully ,Rob Mize
     
  2. shooter99

    shooter99 Well-Known Member

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    Reprint of an earlier post.

    Subject: Lock time of popular trap guns From: Dennis DeVault Email: Date: 06-Apr-09

    Yes I have checked the lock time of a Remington 3200 and it checked at 2 milliseconds. The 3200 was the fastest production arc hammer gun that was ever made. The only way we have acheived faster lock times is with the in-line plunger that is foumd on the Infinity, MachOne, Seitz, and Bowen. I have not checked the Browning Cynergy. My machine is down at the factory being updated so that I can now use windows and we will be able to check set weight and release pressure with the new software. This machine that we have measures different areas of a trigger, lock time, the travel distance until the sears let go, pounds of pull required to start the trigger moving, peak pull poundage, and overtravel. It has helped me in gun design and to learn the dynamics of a shotgun, but I will say again the most important factor for all this is consistancy from shot to shot. I have shot with Drew Waller for several years and he is by far the most critical person that I have met when it comes to triggers. If the trigger he is shooting starts to change in his Perazzi on the next trap it is out of the gun the next rebuilt trigger is in the gun for the next field. The better shooters that I have had dealings with with know when their trigger goes bad and do not hesitate to make a change. Thank you,

    Dennis DeVault
     
  3. Unknown1

    Unknown1 Well-Known Member

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    <blockquote><I>"...The better shooters that I have had dealings with with know when their trigger goes bad and do not hesitate to make a change."</I></blockquote>Now that's a new one on me! I can tell when a trigger group get filled with mud or sand but I can't image either of these things happening to a coddled trap gun.

    Does anyone really know what this man is referring to by "goes bad"?

    MK
     
  4. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    MK- Top shooters can tell when a trigger changes, even a little bit. If they have been shooting a pull trigger with a 3.75 pound pull and it changes to a 4 pound pull or it develops a little extra travel distance, they can feel the change. I like my release trigger to set at 80 oz and release at 32 oz. If it changes, and it has, to an 80 oz set and a 40 oz release, I can quickly tell the difference. But, since I am not a top shooter that can immediately feel the difference, I always carry a trigger scale with me.

    If anyone wants to check their trigger, my next multi day shoot will be the Dixie Grand. I am always pleased to share my trigger scale and I am not too difficult to find at the larger shoots. I hang around the classification table.

    Pat Ireland
     
  5. 635 G

    635 G Well-Known Member

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    I believe, going bad refers to the timing of the trigger changing-- can because by springs getting weaker or parts wearing.

    Phil Berkowitz
     
  6. Rastoff

    Rastoff Active Member

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    Consistency is far more important than lock time. The difference in lock time is so small that 99% of the shooters out there won't notice.
     
  7. senior smoke

    senior smoke Well-Known Member

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    I have always felt that shooters concern themselves way to much about lock time. In my opinion, from the Remington 870 to the most expensive gun made, your body and mind will automatically adjust to any one gun's lock time. Is there any validity to what I am saying?
    Steve Balistreri
     
  8. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    No. HMB
     
  9. Neil Winston

    Neil Winston Well-Known Member

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    Of course not, Steve. Who ever heard of anyone winning with an 870 or 1100?

    Neil
     
  10. Ahab

    Ahab Well-Known Member

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    Daro Handy?


    :)
     
  11. Twinbirds

    Twinbirds TS Member

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    Little Leo
     
  12. Trap2

    Trap2 Well-Known Member

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    Ahab.... Daro Handy is one of those top shooters that can immediately notice any deviation in trigger performance. I have seen him carry as many as 5 complete trigger groups for his 1100 and watched him change out 3 triggers in one 100 target event. He is, in my mind, the most sensitive shooter I have ever seen when it comes to noticing a change in triggers. He is anal about his triggers, and won't shoot unless his triggers are perfect. I shot with him recently and on Saturday he went through the 3 trigger groups he brought to the shoot. On Sunday, he pulled out of the shoot and just hung around to watch. I asked him why he wasn't shooting and he told me that he didn't have a trigger with him that was acceptable, and rather than put up a bad score due to a "bad" trigger, he decided not to shoot at all... Dan Thome (Trap2)
     
  13. senior smoke

    senior smoke Well-Known Member

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    Rick Barker, and I agree with you too.
    Steve
     
  14. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Yes, and you can also control the shot string using brain waves. HMB
     
  15. brownk80

    brownk80 Member

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    Pat,

    I was wondering if you can tell us how you use a trigger scale on a release? I assume that you cock the gun use the trigger scale to figure out the set poundage but how do you use it for the release.

    I appreciate any thoughts or ideas you may have.

    Thanks,

    Mike Brown
    Brownk80
     
  16. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    Trap2, he is either a real "sensitive shooter" or maybe he needs to find a better gunsmith.
     
  17. JB Logan Co. Ohio

    JB Logan Co. Ohio TS Member

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    Is there any real difference between lock time of a pull trigger versus a release trigger?

    JB=Jerry Beach 8503917
     
  18. brownk80

    brownk80 Member

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    JB,

    I am sure someone will tell me I am wrong but it sure feels that way when you get used to a release. It just seems to go off without your having to think about it so maybe it just seems quicker, but I do believe that it is faster when you get to the target. Can't prove it and maybe I am not being clear but I don't see as many people dropping the muzzle or jerking it when they get to the target as I seem to see with pull triggers.

    JMHO

    Mike Brown
     
  19. Jawhawker

    Jawhawker TS Member

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    Trap2, Kiner.

    Shooting an 870,1100, etc has nothing to do with the ability of lock times and noticing a change thereof unless it pertains to that specific trigger group. For all those that don't think lock times matter, take an 870 or 1100 shooter and put a Bowen, Seitz etc in their hands and see where they miss the target.
     
  20. Rastoff

    Rastoff Active Member

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    JB,

    Lock time is the time it takes for the hammer to strike the primer once released from the sear. Therefore, lock time has no relation to pull or release triggers.
     
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