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Listening and learning....

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by jlesley, Jan 31, 2010.

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  1. jlesley

    jlesley TS Member

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    I'm am finding it amazing the more I listen to some shooters talk about the different things they do for winter vs. summer, practice vs. competition, etc. how many different variations there are to this game. Yesterday I had some guys tell me they will shoot 7/8 oz. with a full choke for 16 yds. during practice and then switch to 1 or 1 1/8 oz and improved modified for competition, use 7 1/2 shot for winter time, make their shells a little hotter for winter, etc. I found that interesting....some of the stuff they said made sense, some didn't (I'm new, so alot of it doesn't make sense, yet...) Do you guys play around with stuff like this too or just stick with one thing? Just curious..... Jill
     
  2. rhymeswithorange

    rhymeswithorange Member

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    Be careful who you take advice from
     
  3. shutnlar

    shutnlar TS Member

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    Jill- I agree with sarge all the way. One shell/load for everything. One ounce of 8s works real well until you are at 24-25 yards. Mine go at 1200 fps.Not a lot of recoil and inkballs targets. Hope this helps.

    Larry
     
  4. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Jill- I practice for registered shoots. It does not make sense for me to practice with something different than I will use for registered shoots. Low temperatures will decrease velocity. It is OK to play around with different loads/shot size, but you will find it really makes little difference.

    I shoot very little in the Winter (Florida shoots are an exception). First, I don't like to be cold and second, in the past I found that I picked up some bad habits, many mental, during the Winter that I had to overcome when it got warm.

    Pat Ireland
     
  5. coveybuster

    coveybuster Member

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    In this sport you can think, analyze, adjust, modify, & tweak things to death. I am a "set it and forget it" guy. Don't fix what is not broken. Simplicity works. It's where we all started.
     
  6. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

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    Half the fun of shooting is tinkering around with your setup. Always trying to find that perfect setup. It never happens, of course. But, it's the effort at perfection that draws people into this game.
     
  7. Jack L. Smith

    Jack L. Smith Member

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    Zardozfourty - Chi Chi Rodriguez, around 1998 - was asked why he still plays golf at age 65+

    He said - " I have made over $8 million dollars playing golf. That is great, except my wife spent over $9 million. So I have to keep playing..."

    Is this why many trapshooter's wives work?

    js
     
  8. DTrykow

    DTrykow Active Member

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    Many, many theories out there. If all that stuff makes those guys a better shot, then yes it's worth it. This game is mental and about confidence. For me it's all about gun fit. If your gun is fit right, it don't matter what you load your going to score good. Stick with one load and one gun. Dave T.
     
  9. dverna

    dverna Active Member

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    Most of what you hear is not worth listening to, or worse yet, will take you down the wrong road.

    Use common sense and facts to guide you.

    If money and recoil are not an issue, 1 1/8 oz of shot is ALWAYS better. Only a moron would consider less is better.

    Get the gun fitted by someone who knows what they are doing (easier said than done). Pattern your gun, see what load works best. Adjust for POI.

    Take one or two clinics form a real pro before you learn bad habits. Now go shoot with a plan to build the foundation for being a good shot. Ignore the clubhouse BS.

    Don Verna
     
  10. cubancigar2000

    cubancigar2000 Well-Known Member

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    I am actually a big offender of switching loads etc. For the record I always end up back to a sensible low recoil load at some point. Recoil will destroy your game if you let it. Right now I am shooting 1 1/16 oz loads and plan to stay with them but you never know
     
  11. oleolliedawg

    oleolliedawg Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    Before you spend any time listening to anyone ask them how many 100 or 200 straights they broke, what ATA class they're in and how many successful students they've ever trained. 90% of your so-called coaches will answer none-Class B or C-none!!
     
  12. highflyer

    highflyer TS Member

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    I think a lot of shooters use cheaper shells for playing around than they do in tournaments. When I reloaded I would use 7/8 ounce loads for practice or when it didn't count. It is cheaper. I will also leave in tighter chokes to practice. I find when shooting lighter loads that 7 1/2's break better than 8's. I did this a couple of weeks ago when shooting with 1 ounce of shot and a modified choke on the trap range moving around at different distances practicing for a sporting clays tournament. Hit, miss, hit, miss with 8's. I went to the truck and got the same exact shell only with 7 1/2's, hit, hit, hit. I practice at skeet with modified choke. When it counts I use skeet choke. The tighter choke makes you be more on target during practice.
     
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