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linseed oil

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by eddie lee, Feb 22, 2009.

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  1. eddie lee

    eddie lee TS Member

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    what can you add to linseed oil to speed up drying time ?
    tried paint thinner didn,t help
    tks eddie
     
  2. Ahab

    Ahab Well-Known Member

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    3,651
    Japan drier...available at most paint stores.
     
  3. Carol Lister

    Carol Lister TS Member

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    Which linseed oil are you trying to use? Boiled or Raw?

    Carol Lister
     
  4. gun fitter

    gun fitter TS Member

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    I would recomend a comercially availavle finish like permaline or Chempack Pro custom oil. Both available from brownells. Japan drier works but you have to experiment to much.

    Just my opinion but I do finish guns for a living.

    Joe
     
  5. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    Don't waste your time with linseed oil. It offers little protection. I think gun fitter meant Permalyn. It's my favorite. A tough, hard finish and easy to repair.
     
  6. GW22

    GW22 Active Member

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    The interesting thing about "boiled linseed oil" is that it's not boiled at all (at least 99% of the stuff currently being sold, anyway). For a better true oil finish on furniture, jewelry boxes, etc., Watco Danish Oil does a great job. It's a hybrid mixture avaolable in various tints. If you let it dry a few days, it can also be topped with lacquer like Deft and rubbed to a beautiful lustre. This can also be done on gun stocks, but the finish is not as durable and moisture resistant as some other finishes. I like Danish Oil + Lacquer primarily because it looks like an old-school fine furniture finish instead of the "plastic coated" look of polyurethane and some of the other "modern" finishes. It's also easier to repair if it gets nicked/scratched. -Gary
     
  7. GW22

    GW22 Active Member

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    Oops, forgot to mention -- regardless of whether you're building-up Permalyn or multiple layers of lacquer, etc., be sure to use 0000 steel wool or fine Scoth-Brite between coats. Rub in same direction as grain when possible. -Gary
     
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