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Linotype/wheelweights etc info

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Haskins Bill, Mar 1, 2010.

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  1. Haskins Bill

    Haskins Bill TS Member

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    Last week a question was posed about how much linotype to add to lead for shotmaking. I asked a couple of questions and did some research on alloys. I hope I get this right. I am assuming Roc'C was asking how much Linotype to add to wheelweights. Well, wheel weights according to Lyman already have about 4% antimony in them so linotype would not be needed to make the WW hard enough for shot. Some suggested that he trade the lino to bullet casters for more wheelweights. Now then if casting bullets using wheelweights the ratio is 9 lbs WW to 1 lb 50/50 solder to come up with Lyman #2 or Hard Ball. If stating out with Linotype it is 4 lbs Lino to 5 lbs pure lead with 1 lb of 50/50 solder. These mixes would be for bullets not traveling at very high speeds. Lyman says to harden cast bullets to put them in a oven at 450 for an hour and quench them in room temperature water to bring them up to near 30 Brinnel hardness.The actual procedure is a little more involved. This info is found in Lyman's Cast Bullet Handbook , March 2002 printing. They mention that the antimony content of wheel weights has gone down over the years and have adjusted their receipe accordingly.
     
  2. mkstephen

    mkstephen Active Member

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    When you heat the lead bullets in the oven then quench you are hardening the bullet surface as you know.


    You can accomplish the same thing by quenching them right out of the bullet mold. Fill the mold - strike the sprue cutter - open the mold - tap the bullet out of the mold into a bucket of water.


    Make sure your mold is close to the size you want and your lube sizer is slightly larger than the bullet. If you size down the bullet to any extent after heat treating you will nulify the effect.


    Example if you want a lead bullet for a .38 spl which is .357 bore Lyman suggests casting the bullet at .358. To do the above use a .358 bullet mold and a .359 or .360 sizer bushing and you won't remove the heat treating but you will still lube the bullet.


    Michael Stephenson
     
  3. RobertT

    RobertT Well-Known Member

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    I worked at a newspaper about the time I became interested in handgun shooting. Linotype was readily available for the best price going. We cast thousands of bullets using nothing but Lino lead. Many claim its to hard but I found it to be extremely accurate and never had a barrel leading problem, even with hot 357 loads, also never wore out a barrel. For a defensive load or hunting I'd recommend something else, but sure wish my Lino well was still available.

    Robert
     
  4. TOOLMAKER 251

    TOOLMAKER 251 Active Member

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    Haskins Bill, Did the person last week that was asking for a alloy ratio mention he was using wheel weights, or was it lead? I think he mentioned he had several hundred pound of lead.
     
  5. Haskins Bill

    Haskins Bill TS Member

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    Toolmaker 251, yes he did say lead but as you know sometimes people say one thing while meaning another. That is why I dug up the info. mkstphen, you are exactly correct. In Lyman's book they say to size to desired finish size without lubing and then after oven heat treating to lube the bullets through a die that is one thousandths larger. that way they do not 'work' soften. They also mention puting just a few scrap bullets in the oven at 450 and seeing if they 'slump' and then turning the heat down 5 to 10 degrees and then doing a load of good bullets. I am going to show the pages in the Lyman book to a friend who just quenches after casting and then lub sizes, he may be defeating his purpose. I guess the moral of the story is to have some good reference books on hand or know where to look or ask. I have had this Lyman book for some time and after I posted in response to Roc'nC post I remembered it. I too have a large quantity of Linotype on hand and want to mix it with some pure lead for cast bullets once this darn winter weather is over.Oh, another point, Lyman also suggests adding smaller percentages of 50/50 solder to small batches to see if the cast is good. That way a person does not use any more expensive tin than needed. All good, Bill
     
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