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? Lime/type and how much in shot fall zone

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Haskins Bill, Jan 1, 2010.

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  1. Haskins Bill

    Haskins Bill TS Member

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    Okay: How much lime and what type should be used in the shot fall zone on a trap field? Also on an outdoor pistol/rifle range. We also have turkey shoots so that area should get application too. The ground is mostly clay. When I say the type of lime I am refering to the powdered field type and the pelletized types. Thanks in advance. Bill
     
  2. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Bill - Powdered burnt lime is fine. The amount needed depends on the pH of the soil. It is good to keep records of your efforts. The EPA seems to be happy as long as clubs have an active abatement plan. The club does not have to demonstrate the plan is effective.

    Pat Ireland
     
  3. Joe Smoke

    Joe Smoke Member

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    Bill:
    I'm a better ag consultant than trap shooter! The amount of lime needed for a certain pH goal is dependent on the exchange capacity of the soil. Heavier clays are high exchange and need more lime to get the deisred pH, and sands are low exchange capacity and need less lime to stay in the optimum range, but need maintianed more often. Are you just raising grass in the fall out zone, and a permit requires a pH maintained at a certain level? Also- if crop production is not a factor- use the cheapest lime available. If crop production IS a consideration, then you need to determine whether to use high Calcium lime or Magnesium lime, as they will have different effects on soil structure and water infiltration.

    Either way, you will need a representative soil test to determine your needs.

    Joe
     
  4. Haskins Bill

    Haskins Bill TS Member

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    Thanks Pat and Joe. I knew about the need for an abatement program including having documentation. we have a couple of big time farmers in the club and i am sure they can arrange to get the soil test done. I can also do it, I believe I have a freebie soiltest kit around here someplace. Yes it is just grass in the fall areas. No problems as of yet with lead questions but I want to be ready if the issue comes up. We are surrounded on three sides by Metro Park land and a farm field to the East. No permit required at this time. I am just doing some home work to be able to bring the subject up to the board of directors. I mentioned it to the president during the summer and his comment more or less was" Oh yeah maybe in the trap fall zone but we sould not need anything on the outdoor range:! Duh lead is lead! Thanks again. Bill
     
  5. Joe Smoke

    Joe Smoke Member

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    Bill:
    Instead of the "freebie" test- take one 7" deep, 10 or 12 cores, and get with one of the farmers in the club. Send it to a certified reputable lab- then there will be no questions about the validity of the test results, and is a great tool just to keep on hand. We do the same thing.
     
  6. Haskins Bill

    Haskins Bill TS Member

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    Thanks Joe. the kit I have is a prepaid one to send off to the Uiversity and it was a gimmee for Paticipating in a class i took last year. Bill
     
  7. Joe Smoke

    Joe Smoke Member

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    Bill:
    Just thinking, if you would consider reclaiming the lead at sometime, and you have heavy clay soils, use a high Calcium lime. In many areas, this lime is free from water treatment facilities. This will loosen up clay soils, and make a reclamation effort easier. Using a Magnesium (dolomite) lime on heavy clay soils makes them very hard and tight.

    The lime will also help keep the lead from oxidizing and in better shape for reclaiming.
     
  8. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Bill- You are doing a very wise thing that every gun club should consider. Lead pollution is an issue we must face and a little lime can prevent a lot of future problems.

    Pat Ireland
     
  9. Joe Potosky

    Joe Potosky Well-Known Member

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    RE: Lead pollution is an issue

    There is two clubs in Vermont that I'm aware that locals are going after the clubs for supposed lead issues. You have to be proactive on the issue.

    Off topic, one of the clubs also had issues with building without permits. I see this over and over. Once a local fails on a noise issue thye brought against the club they look at buidling permits, club has changed it's usage (added 5-stand or sporting clays) and of course the lead issue.

    I read a few years back where one club each year sent a representative to the local town board and gave a briefing on club activites, to include future plans. He also answered any and all questions. Thats being proactive...
     
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