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lightest weight wood suitable for guns?

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by skeet_man, May 19, 2008.

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  1. skeet_man

    skeet_man Well-Known Member

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    need to shave as much weight out of the front of my new gun w/ out having any mods done to the barrel, so a lightweight forend may be the ticket. What is the lightest weight wood suitable for gunstock work? I also wonder about using glass filled nylon (same material as my pfs grip), anyone know a firm that could make a forend out of this material?
     
  2. coyote268

    coyote268 TS Member

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    Yama Wood from Japan is the lightest and hardest wood known. Japan has labled it a national treasure so its pretty hard to get nowadays. I have two custom stocks made of it and its awsome. Havn't moved a thousant of an inch in thirty five years.
    Dan
     
  3. DTrykow

    DTrykow Active Member

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    White wood. They also call it Tulip Poplar. Light weight, straight grained, It's the softest of the hardwoods but hard as nails when it's Dried. It's used for drawer frames. Once it dries you can't drive a nail thru it. Dave T.
     
  4. skeet_man

    skeet_man Well-Known Member

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    let me clarify, would like something that has the ability to have decent grain as well (going on a kolar).
     
  5. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Dave T. I have used around 50,000 board feet of poplar and I have never seen any of it get hard as you described. It is a good cabinet/furniture wood for areas that get little wear and are not seen.

    Hard wood is dense wood, and dense wood is heavy. I think skeet man is wanting something he can not get. I would not use anything softer than Birch. Birch does have some grain figure in it but you have to look really close to see it.

    Now, if skeet man wants to change from a tree wood for his gun and use a grass- bamboo is really strong and light weight. I can ship him all of the bamboo he needs if he will send me a box 4"X4"X 30 feet.

    Pat Ireland
     
  6. DTrykow

    DTrykow Active Member

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    Pat: If that Tulip was glass bedded, do you think it would work? Dave T.
     
  7. hoggy

    hoggy TS Member

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    Seems to me the wood alone on a forearm does NOT weigh very much. Its the forearm iron that weighs any appricable amount. Not sure you're going to accomplish what you want changing the wood.
     
  8. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    I would hollow out the wood as much as possible to get the weight down. That would lighten the wood considerably and still look good.
     
  9. turmite

    turmite Member

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    Well this is an area I might be able to help in. I make benchrest stocks from balsa/carbon fiber and have lots of experience in building other light weight competition stocks for benchrest.

    Paulownia is a wood almost as light as balsa, with grain structure much like ash, in that it is very open and the pits to finish. One of the earlier post was dead on. Light weight and figure do not go together. Most lightwight woods are butt ugly. One exception is spalted woods that have began to soften in the rotting process. They do have to be stabiizied but offer both light weight and beauty.

    If I were doing this job, I would recommend making a slightly undersized fore end from balsa, vacuum bag carbon fiber over it, clear coat it and then have it dipped with the wood grain of your choice. Expensive process, but will get you what you want.

    Mike
     
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