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Lifting and/or moving head off the rib.

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by ansvel, Oct 31, 2008.

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  1. ansvel

    ansvel Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    168
    I shoot well if I avoid the problems above. I’m trying to acquire the target ASAP and then
    my head starting moving out of the rib and as a result I lose the gun reference and miss.
    Who has/had problem like this, please advise.
    Thanks.
     
  2. Andy Moreland

    Andy Moreland TS Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2008
    Messages:
    67
    Acquire the target quickly but don't move the gun to it until you have a solid, focused eye lock on it. You'll point the gun where you're looking then.

    Andy Moreland
     
  3. ansvel

    ansvel Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
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    Andy,
    Yes, in theory I agree. But when I call very often to time for thinking about this: one day my shooting is perfect, the next one is disaster…
     
  4. Rollin Oswald

    Rollin Oswald Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,313
    Location:
    Brillion, WI
    Head movement during swings can result if the position of the head and neck is tilted, leaned or turned in an unnatural position when the gun is mounted. Ideally, the head and neck should both be upright and turned very little toward the stock.

    Andy of course, is absolutely correct when he writes that you should visually lock onto the target before starting your swing. In addition, the upper body should move as a unit. The angle of the gun to a line across the shoulders should remain constant during swings.

    Swings should occur with the upper body moving like the turret on a tank with power supplied by the leg and waist muscles.

    How well the dimensions of your stock fit your particular size and shape along with the shooting form, particularly the gun mount that is used, have a lot to do with the likelihood of your head (and eye) remaining aligned with the rib during swings.

    Raising the head if often the result of a low gun mount or an inadequate stock dimension known as the drop at the heel (the distance of the top of the recoil pad, the heel, below the level of the rib. Both should match the length of the shooters neck to allow the use of an upright Head and neck position with the gun mounted.

    Moving the gun away from the cheek if often caused by arm-swinging the gun rather than rotating the upper body to swing laterally.

    Rollin
     
  5. recurvyarcher

    recurvyarcher Well-Known Member

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    Apr 26, 2006
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    "Head movement during swings can result if the position of the head and neck is tilted, leaned or turned in an unnatural position when the gun is mounted."

    This is EXACTLY what I experienced. Once I learned to keep my head straight and more upright, this went away.

    Sometimes it happens if I shoot a gun that bumps me in the face, as when my TM-1 broke on me. After that happens, I have to retrain myself to not be scared.

    Both instances turn out to be a gun fit problem with me, just like Rollin indicates.
     
  6. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Mesquite, Nevada
    Just my take but a stock thats too long for a shooter almost always requires a tilted head forward pose. Minimize the forward tilt as much as possible and follow the advice about actually seeing the target prior to upper body movement toward the clay. A parallel comb works great for trapshooters or any type of shooting for that matter. One no-no in my book is too much leading "arm" only movement toward a quick clay, helps move the comb away from the cheek. Hap
     
  7. ismah

    ismah Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2008
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    518
    Ansvel, Practice your mount. When you're at home set up a time to do nothing but raise your gun to the proper point at your shoulder, position your cheek to comb, adjust your stance with your forward leg slightly bent. Stance is important. Imagine finding the target, shoot it, HOLD YOUR POSITION AFTER FIRING (follow through) then lower your gun and do it again. Do this every night. You'll stop raising your head. I guarantee it.
     
  8. Old Cowboy

    Old Cowboy Active Member

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    2,988
    Head lifting, arm shooting & bead checking.........if I could just eliminate these three bad habits from my shooting the rest would be easy. Sometimes I do all three at the same time.

    John C. Saubak
     
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