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Length of Pull question

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Dr.Longshot, Sep 21, 2009.

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  1. Dr.Longshot

    Dr.Longshot Banned Banned

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    I have 34 inch sleeve length but I have my guns put on zero pich and 14 inch LOP 5'11" 230lbs


    Gary Bryant
    Dr.longshot
     
  2. Larry/Oh

    Larry/Oh TS Member

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    Us oldtimers used to determine length of pull by placing recoil pad in crook of arm. If the trigger was easily reached by the trigger finger, it was a fit.
     
  3. JACK

    JACK Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    "If it doesn't fit, you must acquit," became Cochran's mantra as he tried to convince jurors that the case laid out by prosecutors is inconsistent and full of holes
     
  4. Rollin Oswald

    Rollin Oswald Active Member

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    Frank,



    MIA has your answer.

    Seriously though, as Fred/U.S. Marine Retired wrote (thanks, Fred), a correct LOP depends on elements of the shooting form that is used, e.g., how directly the shooter faces targets and the height of the gun mount, as well as the length of the shooter's neck and whether or not the "drop at the heel" dimension (distance of the recoil pad below the rib) matches the length of the shooter's neck and the pitch of the stock.

    If the LOP is too long, the gun will be awkward to swing. If it is too short, there can be an unwelcome meeting of the nose and thumb during recoil. The common check for LOP is the distance between the nose and the second joint of the trigger-hand thumb - two finger-widths is about right.

    The only problem with that is the number of things that will affect it. The goal is to shoot with a natural, upright shooting posture with the head and neck also upright and not leaned or tilted. When this can be done and there is adequate separation of the nose and thumb, the gun fits.

    That isn't much help but LOP is affected by elements of the shooting form that is used (stance, gun mount, body posture) as well as other stock dimensions.

    Rollin
     
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