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Leg of Lamb

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by JACK, Mar 30, 2010.

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  1. JACK

    JACK Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    Leg of Lamb 3-30-2010

    Bought a 3 lb boneless half leg from CUB Foods.
    Froze it for 3 months in freezer paper

    Mostly defrosted it, about 75%

    usual spices, garlic powder, Onoin powder McCormick Italian spice

    Put in non stick 5 qt Calphalon along with

    1 Beef Bouillon and 1-1/2 C water.

    Covered it with lid

    Into oven on automatic at 240 degrees

    Set it for 3 hours but it looked done at 2 hours

    I pulled it, sliced a corner and indeed it was tender and done.

    Gravy from juice was good. Used a can of Swanson broth for gravy.

    Essentially made it like a pot roast and served it with carrots, potatoes, and celery.

    Very good and was quite surprised.

    I am a big fan of oven and timer cooking. Frees up your right hand for a wine glass.
     
  2. wayneo

    wayneo Active Member

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    When I was in high school I worked in a Greek restaurant. They roasted whole leg of lamb with slivers of garlic inserted into the meat and covered it with olive oil, oregano, basil, salt, and pepper. Roasted it until it was medium rare, about 130 degrees. Fantastic.

    FWIW, according to the USDA, lamb has to be less then one year old. Usually brought to market between 6 and 8 months old. Spring lamb has to be slaughtered between March and October. Mutton is meat from sheep in the US. Wayne
     
  3. short shucker

    short shucker TS Member

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    I sent a few of those critters to market a couple of weeks ago. You get a very good price for them if they are ready before Easter.

    Like wayneo stated, their is a big difference between lamb and mutton.

    I only send lambs to market. I have only lamb in my freezer. Slow cook it on the grill under low heat and you'll never eat better. The worst cut of lamb has better marbelizing than the best cut of beef.

    ss
     
  4. shooterIII

    shooterIII Member

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    I've tried lamb/mutton---YUK
     
  5. need to shoot more

    need to shoot more Active Member

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    Lamb is delcious
     
  6. blkcloud

    blkcloud Active Member

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    I raised Katahdin sheep for a while.. never ate one but did get some leg of lamb and also a bowl of oxen tail soup at a casino buffet once, the soup was dee-lischious, the lamb aparently wasnt cooked right.. I couldnt eat it..
     
  7. Kim Little

    Kim Little Member

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    If it is mutton it's not lamb. Mutton is typically considered an aged ewe or wether. Lamb is typically under a year and more tender. Kim
     
  8. Lobo

    Lobo TS Member

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    Old beef and pork isn't good either. Lamb about 100-120 pounds, 9 monthes, corn fed, nothing better. Boer goat kid 5-6 monthes, 50-70 is good, too, but gets tougher faster and marbles very little.
     
  9. squirrelkiller

    squirrelkiller TS Member

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    Have had it and will eat it. No offense, but we call them critters "Range Maggots" around here.
     
  10. Bob Merkov

    Bob Merkov Member

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    Lamb shanks- braised and then slow cooked in your pasta gravy along with the meat balls. Out of sight.
     
  11. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    I love lamb chops. My wife doesn't like'em, so I never get to have them unless we find a restaurant that serves lamb. I asked the kids (ages16 & 20) if they'd ever hd lamb, and by golly, nope. I'll have to get some, along with a pork chop for the wife.

    Mutton is another story. It's just too old and often too tough.

    A number of years ago I heard about a gal in eastern Oregon who had feral sheep all over her ranch, and she wanted them shot. I was all set to go over and get a few lambs for the freezer, but all that was left were old ewes. I passed.
     
  12. Ifitfliesitdies

    Ifitfliesitdies Member

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    Newfoundlander,

    Mutton is and OLD Full Grown Sheep. Lamb is YOUNG!

    I really like LAMB but I don't care for Mutton!

    Try some really good quality, YOUNG lamb roasted medium rare and you'll see the difference.

    Shoot well, often and safely.

    Tom
     
  13. LUGNUTZ426

    LUGNUTZ426 TS Member

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    Go Greek! cut that bad boy into chunks....marinate in italian dressing, lemon juice onion,pepper,oregano and garlic. put on skewers and throw em on the grill. medium rare is best.
    serve with rice, greek salad, a little yogurt sauce ( plain yogurt/olive oil
    and oregano) fried pita bread and bigass jug of cold white wine.
     
  14. wireguy

    wireguy TS Member

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    "Mutton yesterday, mutton today and blimey if it don't look like mutton again tommorer!"
    Troll, complaining, THE HOBBIT
     
  15. JACK

    JACK Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    Easter is upon us and lamb is a traditional main dish as you know. But come MOnday, the meat case will have numerous legs left an I will con* the butcher into selling me the legs at half price. (done it before). Then I will add insult to injury and have him take it in the back, de-bone it, then hav ehim roll-tie it into two chunks (further reducing the cost) and send me on my merry way. I will try the skewer recipe, and too, I am a big fan of 130 rare, but I liv ein a compromise househoold and a bit of pink is all that is allowed. Ya know?

    My wine store of preference is a place called "Morelli's". they do a land offic business in selling of liquor that the suppliers want to lower inventory levels. Today I am buying Bogle 2007 cabernet rated at about 90 points. The write up is above on the web site. I do nto know the price until Iget to the store, but likely it will be a 90 point wine at around 8 bucks.

    And I apologize for not taking pics of the finished lamb roast. I'll do that next time.

    *Short for convince
     
  16. LUGNUTZ426

    LUGNUTZ426 TS Member

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    the good thing about the skewers is you can leave one or two on longer for those who don't like it rare
     
  17. shannon391

    shannon391 Active Member

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    Braised Shank is the only way I can eat it. Cooked long slow and low.

    Fork tender and no gamey lamb aftertaste.
     
  18. Bruce Specht

    Bruce Specht Well-Known Member

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    Just finished a Leg of Lamb dinner cooked on the charcaol grill 3lbs for two hrs.Spices? Garlic and Marjorim excellent is an understatement. Served with a grilled sweetpotatotes, grilled aspargus and a salad. Oh and a bottle of Cab
     
  19. JACK

    JACK Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    I mentioned that I would go by the store butcher shop and talk the butcher out of a leg at a lower price... Uh... no, he talked me into buying the sleg. I had him deboe it and I brought it home and tied it up into a roast like deal. And froze it. I would hav ecooked it, but I need to alter my offerings. So yesterday I made a easy version of chicken catch-i-torri. Was pretty good. I buy on sale everything. Chicken legs often sell for just a buck a pound an so I keep that stuff around all the time. One of my easy meals is baked/baarbequed chicken legs. Just sauce on them and in the oven. I loke to cook outside but do not enjoy the running in ans out. So I am an oven/stove cooker.

    But I will try that skewer on the barbie method. sounds like a vinner. Oh, and don't forget a bottle of cab fo rme. My current cheapo fave is Chateau Ste MIchelle, Indian Wells. Buyting that at about $9.50 a bottle. Good stuff. If you find a wine called Trapiche in their oak cask Malbec, It is outstanding. Anothe wine I pay abou t$8 for.

    Jack
     
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