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Lead Issue Heating Back Up

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by wireguy, Apr 11, 2011.

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  1. wireguy

    wireguy TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
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    From
    The Shooting Wire for Monday, April 11

    FEATURE
    Lead Issue Heating Back Up

    The idea of getting the lead out of ammunition is one that has caused heated debate both inside and outside the shooting industry. Today, there are non-lead cartridges available in virtually any caliber, but that doesn't mean the industry is anywhere near giving lead up.

    Last year, the Environmental Protection Agency denied a petition from the American Bird Conservancy and a group of animal-rights based organizations asking that the EPA broaden its mandate to outlaw lead as a component of ammunition. It is not in the EPA's purview to regulate ammunition, but the petition had suggested the EPA use its authority to ban lead as a component in both ammunition and fishing tackle.

    In the end, the EPA denied both components of the petition, citing several reasons, including a lack of comprehensive evidence to support the petition.

    On Friday, the American Bird Conservancy issued a press release outlining a new survey announced at the Society of Toxicology's annual meeting in Washington. That survey, the ABC contends, points to lead ammunition "as a primary factor limiting the survival and recovery of one of the country's most imperiled birds, the California Condor." (Editor's Note: You can read the ABC release here).

    This survey, conducted by scientists at the University of California/Santa Cruz, the University of Wyoming, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the National Park Service is "especially important and unique" according to Dr. Michael Fry, an avian toxicologist and Director of Conservation Advocacy for the ABC, not just because it cites lead as a major factor, but it "cites lead ammunition specifically."

    Dr. Fry contends the survey provides the smoking gun, if you will, that dismisses a key argument from the ammunition industry: the lack of specific data to identify a source or sources of lead poisoning. This survey, he says, "connects the dots between condor deaths and lead ammunition."

    The study was reportedly performed using 17 pre-release condors exposed to background levels of lead and 70 free-flying condors in California.

    Blood was collected from the birds and compared to a representative selection of 71 lead-based ammunitions. Purportedly, the results show the lead signature of free-flying condors as different from that of the pre-release birds.

    That difference, the ABC contends, proves that an overwhelming majority of the free-flying condors had been exposed to lead-based ammunition.

    Further, the ABC says, the levels in thirty-five percent of the birds was at toxic levels.

    With a pair of government agencies signed on to this survey, the results will undoubtedly be used to reopen the issue of lead in ammunition.

    With non-lead ammunitions available for virtually any firearm, the argument for non-viable alternatives to lead has already been considerably weakened.

    While the study would seem to weaken the case for lead's continued usage in modern ammunition, the release then goes on to cite the 2008 controversy over lead ammunition in venison.

    In that instance, a Centers for Disease Control report regarding human exposure to lead in venison recommended "food pantries and their clients should be made aware of possible lead fragments in venison."

    That led to the North Dakota Health Department halting venison distribution in food pantries. In Minnesota, more than a thousand pounds of venison headed for food pantries was disposed of. Later, both the original study -and the lead levels- were found to be a questionable threat to public health.

    Despite the fact that much of the rhetoric about lead from animal rights groups is more overblown than substantiated, this latest report will doubtless set the stage for another heated battle over lead in ammunition.

    As always, we'll keep you posted.

    --Jim Shepherd
     
  2. wireguy

    wireguy TS Member

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    I worked in the labaratories of a major university for 8 years, and as a group I can tell you that scientists are the biggest group of frauds and con artists ever made. They utterly ignore the scientific method when it suits their agenda while hiding behind it as a shield that no one dare question. Just one example is the emails about global warming that were exposed and showed that these British environment scientists were outright liars. Science is for sale to the highest bidder and has been for a long time. Give me the money and I will have a scientist "find" anything you want.
     
  3. 22hornet

    22hornet Well-Known Member

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    How could the venison be so contaminated? That must be some pretty shot up deer meat. The whole thing is a scam.
     
  4. hehawboy

    hehawboy Member

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    this country would be better off without the idiots of the epa ,dep etc .these as%#$@#$#%holes don't have anything better to do than bust the balls of the hard working men!!!! These idiots are all theory smart but common sense stupid!!!
     
  5. timberfaller

    timberfaller Well-Known Member

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    Government agency's have to "create" work for the departments. The lead scam is just one such issues!

    As long as the shooting public buy's into the false science it will continue to be propagandized!!
     
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