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Lead Clean Up problem

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by shutupandshoot, Oct 25, 2007.

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  1. shutupandshoot

    shutupandshoot Member

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    Gathered up a lot of lead from various sources. Have a friend who has a shotmaker and will help make shot but the lead stopped up his machine. The problem seem sto be a gray power in appearance that forms on top and cannot be gotten rid of. I stir, stir, and stir and use a lot of wax but when you clean the skim off and stir again, it's right back. I checked the temp. and I am burning at 800 degrees and sometimes maybe too long as it turns a brown color as if it is burnt but that is very seldom. What am I doing wrong. The lead I melted came from 2 different buckets. We are trying another bucket but I feel like it is something I am doing wrong

    Suggestions??????????
     
  2. Shootrman

    Shootrman Member

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    Without seeing what you are referring to: I would suggest not to stir it at all. Skim off the top frequently and when you have it all scimmed then burn the wax. At that point I pour it into my molds, let it cool and then I re-melt in in my shotmaker. If all fails, quit and GIVE me the lead. What A GUy! Seriously if I can help email me.
     
  3. shutupandshoot

    shutupandshoot Member

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    Thanks
    If I don't stir, doesn't the trash stat suspended in the lead.
    I will try this tomorrow but the results won't be known until you try to run it
     
  4. jim brown

    jim brown Well-Known Member

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    Be careful of the lead oxide on the surface it is very easy to get it into the air you breathe and is very bad for you.


    I lifted this form a scuba site but it is to the point:

    4. Flux the lead for uniform results.
    Fluxing is the adding of a material which helps the alloying metals mix together and to float impurities to the surface for removal. If you melt a lead alloy, you will see a silvery scum on the surface of the molten metal. This scum is lead oxide and tin. The flux will help the tin to recombine with the alloy and will cause the lead oxide to precipitate in an easily removed form. Beeswax is a commonly available fluxing agent, however there are other commercial fluxing agents usually available from bullet casting supply houses that do not smoke or flare as much. Almost any hydrocarbon with a high flash point will work for fluxing. Old frying grease, crankcase oil, parrafin, “axle grease”, lard, etc have been used with success. These lower flash point materials will ignite and flare! Never the less the low flash point materials will still function as a flux if you are working in an area with nothing flammable overhead where the flame can be tolerated. With beeswax, about 1/4 teaspoon stirred into a 20 pound pot is all that is needed to clean up the alloy for pouring, although it will smoke a lot! Repeat fluxing and skimming until the mix is clean.
     
  5. shutupandshoot

    shutupandshoot Member

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  6. Jim101

    Jim101 Active Member

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    I'll just add one thing to J.B.s'good advice. Try to keep the temp as low as you can. Just enough to keep the alloy liquid.




    Jim
     
  7. shutupandshoot

    shutupandshoot Member

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    Thanks
    Burning at a lower temp may be worth a try. why does my friend not have the same problem as he burns at about the temp
     
  8. shutupandshoot

    shutupandshoot Member

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  9. jim brown

    jim brown Well-Known Member

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    His lead source may be cleaner or have fewer alloys. Higher temps may tend to burn some of the impurities but shouldn't do much to the lead unless we are talking about really high temps.

    jim brown
     
  10. jim brown

    jim brown Well-Known Member

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    Again be careful. Most lead ingestion occurs from the lead oxide on the surface being stirred into the air and taken in through the lungs or settling on food or smokes and taken in through the mouth. Be very careful when you stir or skim the pot, this is the dangerous time.

    jim brown
     
  11. scott k

    scott k TS Member

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    what kind of lead?
     
  12. 1radman

    1radman TS Member

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    to clean up the impurites. Take a piece of a raw potato on a stick or rod and stir the molton lead. This will bring the impurites to the top then scrape it to the side and pull it off. This will work..

    radman
     
  13. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    How long to cook the potato?

    Sorry, couldn't resist.


    HM
     
  14. shutupandshoot

    shutupandshoot Member

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    Thanks to everyone. I tried another pot this morning with the temp a lot lower.
    Still got a little scum but not like before and it cleaned up better. I'll try the potato. I know the previous temp was 800 and higher. This time I stirred slower but more often. It appears that the scum is not something suspended in the lead but I believe it is just layin on the surface due to over burning or something in my process that I am doing different
     
  15. shutupandshoot

    shutupandshoot Member

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  16. 333t

    333t Member

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    A potato contains a lot of water and would be very dangerous with molten lead.
    Don't do it is my advice.

    Phil
     
  17. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Phil is correct. A raw potato is about 85% water. Stirring with some sort of screen material might work for you. I have melted shot removed from the ground. Some of the shot gets covered with a layer of oxides and carbonates that melt at very high temperatures. I would see many shot that were molten on the inside but still contained within the layer of carbonates. These shot had to be squeezed to get the lead out.

    Pat Ireland
     
  18. shutupandshoot

    shutupandshoot Member

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    I had a batch that was gold and blue and I was wondering if that meant it was too hot. Thanks for the info
     
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