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lead casting question---hardness

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by plinker61, Jan 30, 2009.

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  1. plinker61

    plinker61 TS Member

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    Jan 31, 2007
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    had a fellow shooter supply me with some lead to make shot out of for him, and need some help figureing out what ratio i should use to get it hard enough for hard shot.im used to making shot from strait wheel weights,(no stick on or soft lead).

    what i got was 400 lbs of indoor range lead(should render 300 lbs of clean lead),and 60 lbs of lino type,now the range lead has jacketed bullets,.22's,and some cast bullets so it wont be as hard as my wheel weights,but it will be harder than soft lead,my melting pots are 8 qt dutch ovens,and i get 175 lbs of finished lead per pot(run 2 at the same time 350 lbs per round)would a mix with 10% lino be too mutch?or will that be wasting lino(too mutch)im going to guess that the range lead is around 7-8 brinnel hardness?i know the rifel shooters are wondering why im wasting the lino,but after giving my word to my customer that ill use his supply'd lead ,i have to follow through,any suggestions will help,mark
     
  2. Shooter R

    Shooter R Active Member

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    Dec 13, 2008
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    If you have 300# of scrap bullet lead, and 60# of good linotype, that's a ratio of 5:1, which should be plenty hard. Lino has a lot of tin and antimony in it. I would bet it would be harder than "magnum" lead shot.

    Here's one way to test hardness: Since it would be rather difficult to squash 2 #7 1/2 round BB's together, I would suggest to first measure with a micrometer some of your BB's, and then other BB's from a bag of "Magnum" Factory 7 1/2's. When you find a couple of each that are perfectly round, and they same measured diameter, slightly flatten several from each of the 2 groups with a light tap of a hammer. Then find "pairs" from each group with the exact same thickness (use a micrometer!). Then...put the 2 together in a vise and squeeze them until they "squash" a little, it dosen't have to be a lot. Then measure the 2 BB's (you may want to color your with a marking pen to tell the difference). If your BB's end up thicker, they are in fact, harder.

    This is a very crude way to determine relative hardness. It does work fairly well with cast bullets.

    I've tried to present a method for you to somewhat tell if your shot is on par (hardness wise) with factory shot. I hope this helps.
     
  3. TOOLMAKER 251

    TOOLMAKER 251 Active Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
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    Plinker61,whats inside of a jacketed bullet and 22's are pure lead. Linotype is 84% lead 4% tin and 12% antimony. Linotype is much harder then magnum shot and wheelweights used to be about 95% lead 1% tin and 4% antimony but anymore the weights I have been casting are not as hard as it was in the past. If you have cast bullet lead it should be excellent for making shot, but if you have pure lead I would alloy it with a ratio of 50% lead 50% linotype and it would give you a mixture very close to Taracorp magnum shot.
     
  4. plinker61

    plinker61 TS Member

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    thanks all ,im going to go with shooter r's mix ill let you know how it comes out,my black max will let me know rite away if its too soft(larger shot&blobs) for shot,if so i can harden it up with my wheel weights,mark
     
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