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Justifying a .375 Ruger or 9.3x74R

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by 7remmag, Jul 23, 2011.

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  1. 7remmag

    7remmag Member

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    I do not know why, but I have become infatuated with getting a larger caliber rifle. I have a Ruger 1-B in .257 Roberts and a Remington M700 in 7mm Remington Magnum and I realize that those two calibers pretty much cover any game, besides dangerous game, in the United States. I am not planning on going to Africa or Alaska, but for some reason I would really like to own a large bore rifle. I've decided on a Ruger 1-S in either .375 Ruger or 9.3x74R, but I'm hoping to justify it by being able to hunt with one of those calibers in the United States. I would like someone to please say that they have used either of these calibers on deer or black bear and also some information on the two calibers. It's going to be a few months before I purchase the rifle so please keep the opinions coming.

    Thank you,

    Kyle
     
  2. short shucker

    short shucker TS Member

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    Stick to the gold standard of big bore rifles, The 375 H&H. This will kill anything you want to no matter the continent. The other way would be a 45/70. Both will get the job done and bullet selection is very good for both.

    Anything bigger than your .257 Roberts on deer/antelope size game is totally unecessary.

    ss
     
  3. cnsane

    cnsane Member

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    Gawd,, I'd like to be there when you touch off the first shot. It would put a smile on my face unless it put an inverted one above your eyebrow. Shooting a high bullet weight magnum in a light framed rolling block will loosen your teeth until you learn the proper form to master the gun and the recoil. Took me over 500 shots to master a .458 Win. heavy barreled bolt gun shooting light (300-350 grain) bullets. A little hint is: Do not try to shoulder the recoil. Learn to ride the shot. Or get a lead sled and never learn proper form. But I hear that a sled gets heavy when you're out hunting. And if you later try to shoot without the Caldwell Crutch, your gun will (ocular) ring your bell. Remember- the bigger the cartridge, the more consistant you have to be in the manner you shoulder it. That, and the Flinch Factor are the main reasons why most people can't hit the broad side of a barn from inside the barn when it comes to a five shot group with a big magnum.
     
  4. Don Steele

    Don Steele Well-Known Member

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    I don't know too much about the .375 Ruger. From what I've read, it seems to be a decent cartridge. The 9.3 x 74 rimmed is a classic, but I'd only want to own that one in a doble rifle, then if I'm paying THAT kind of money...I'd choose a different caliber. The .416 is a caliber family I've never owned, but will be my next choice, you might take a look at those also.
    I already have 45/70, .375 H&H, and .458 win mag. In the dark future the Democrat party wants to bring us when we may find ourselves limited to a single rifle..."You don't NEED more than that", my choice will be the .375 H&H. For deer and hog hunting here in the U.S., I've enjoyed working up moderate cast bullet loads. You might consider that option also to be able to enjoy shooting your new rifle a lot, at much lower cost in cash and punishment.
     
  5. ML

    ML Member

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    Shoot a 375 JRS Mag with 285 gr. cast bullets and a small charge if Blue Dot. It is a blast on prairie dogs. Don't kick much and fun to shoot.


    Regards

    M.L.
     
  6. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Well-Known Member

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    The Nine-Threes suffer from bullet selection. They are usually set up for the 286 gr bullet. The 9.3X74R brass is very expensive, and does not last long with full throttle loads. The most practical round will be either 375. I went with the Holland. The Ruger case will last longer with red line loads. To get the maximum flexibility of your gun, plan to reload. Use Magnum primers.

    Buy enough brass to last a while. I bought 200 rds of new brass. The 235 gr Speer is a great bullet, and with a case of slow burning powder, it is easy to train with. With 2900+ fps loads, it has roughly the same trajectory as the 30/06 with a 150 gr plain base bullet.

    I also bought 500 270 gr blem bullets from Midway.

    I put two 8 oz reducers in the stock of my No 1 and had Country Gentleman install a Kick Eeze pad to give the gun a 14 1/4" LOP and a little more weight to keep recoil down. The factory LOP is very short on the No 1.

    Lastly, I installed a New England Custom Gun receiver sight and taller front, simply because I like peep sights. There is a Leupold 30 mm scope with factory rings in the closet that will be installed on the gun at a later date.

    The big bore rifles are indeed fun to shoot. If the gun fits and has a good weight, it is very manageable.

    The 45/70 is fun, but is out of gas at 150 yards, no matter how heavy you load it. The 375, with the right bullet, is a 350 yard round, and a definitive dangerous game stopper. Also, it does not tear up meat like many small bores.
     
  7. K-80BUD

    K-80BUD TS Member

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    Shortshucker has it right. you can't do any better than the .375 H&H. I've
    taken two elephant and numerous other game with one. For slightly less recoil and slightly less performance you might also consider a 9.3 x 62. (poor man's .375) Bud Wood
     
  8. bluedsteel

    bluedsteel Member

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    A friend and I went through the "big bore" stage several years ago. We don't hunt very often, and have never hunted big game, but we became fascinated with these rifles. Over a year or two, we bought the following:

    Weatherby Mark V in .460 Weatherby magnum
    Browning Safari (1960's bolt gun) in .458 Win Mag
    Ruger 77 in .416 Rigby

    We would mainly shoot at boulders or blocks of wood. The Weatherby and the Ruger were equipped with a Leupold 2.5 to something variable scope (I can't recall the exact power), with long eye relief. We didn't scope the Browning.

    A few comments:

    By far, the worst recoil was from the Browning .458. This was due no doubt to the fact that it was the lightest rifle. It was downright unpleasant to shoot. After a round or two, I would get a headache and other effects from the jarring recoil.

    The Weatherby was actually ok to shoot. It was heavier, and it had a factory muzzle brake. We had some 300 gr. handloads that were kind of fun to shoot.

    The Ruger .416 was somewhere in the middle as far as recoil.

    We shot these rifles in the standing position. I would hate to think what a shot off the bench would be like (unless one had a sled or something).

    All of the rifles were impressive in their strength and quality, which attracted us to them in the first place.

    I still would like to have a double rifle, but they are pretty much out of reach as far as cost.

    It was a fun and learning experience. Then we had enough and eventually sold the guns.

    bluedsteel
     
  9. hoffman06

    hoffman06 Member

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    You really can't justify most gun purchases, just buy it and enjoy it. You don't need a reason.
    Carey
     
  10. Ruck

    Ruck Well-Known Member

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    As far as recoil is concerned, consider adding a HEAVY DUTY BUMP-BUSTER to tame it down. Go to my website above to see what it can do!! I've done many big boomers and have many happy owners who now have a manageable rifle because of my system.

    Ken Rucker
     
  11. Texshooter

    Texshooter Member

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    I shot an Orix 2 weeks ago with my Griffin & Howe 375 H&H. I shot the shoulder on purpose with a 270 Gr softpoint; both forequarters were reduced to total mush. It is a great African/trophy gun, but a bit much for normal game. We only kept the hind quarters and backstraps. I considered shooting an elk cow this fall with it, but it is way more gun than I need and not near as flat shooting as my 300 Ultra mag. (Yes I can use a different bullet, blagh, blagh...) AJ
     
  12. omgb

    omgb Well-Known Member

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    Recoil is pretty much a perceived thing, some folks feel it more than others. I've shot the big bores and honestly, there's not that much different from shooting a heavy 1 1/4 oz 12 bore load in a light SxS. I think I'd go with the .375 Ruger simply because brass for the 9.3 is tougher to find. If you mount your scope correctly and you buy a good scope with proper eye relief, your head should never come even close to hitting the ocular ring. Cheap scopes with poor eye relief and improper mounting will get you every time.

    I have a Ruger #1 in .375 H&H and it really doesn't kick any worse that a very light 12 bore I have when the 12 bore is loaded with 3" goose loads. Some guys shooting my gun complain of getting their cheeks slapped, I've never experienced that. I've shot the gun shoulder mounted, one handed, and two handed at the waist, and off of sand bags holding only the wrist of the stock. It recoils some for sure, but it's not a bruiser. Now, I did fire an 4 bore BP double one time that was very uncomfortable. I wouldn't care to do that too often.
     
  13. Don Steele

    Don Steele Well-Known Member

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    As long as we're talking about big bores and shooting them...here's a little drill some of you might enjoy. All shooting in this drill is done offhand, with FULL HOUSE Elephant/Cape Buffalo capable rounds.
    Place 3 plastic milk jugs full of water at 30 yds, 20 yds and 10 yds. Put them up in the air or on tables. You don't want them on the ground for this exercise. When you're ready, shoulder your rifle and shoot the 30 yd. jug. The stopwatch starts when your first shot goes off.
    Now shoot the other 2 jugs in succession, 20 yd next, and 10 yd last. Oh yeah...and just to add a little to the game...have your timekeeper standing behind you...REAL close...screaming in your ear..."SHOOT..FOR GOD'S SAKE SHOOOOTTTT..!!!!"
    Fastest time to bust all three wins.
    Fail to bust all three jugs...NO SCORE. You're dead. THERE IS NO SECOND PLACE.
     
  14. wayneo

    wayneo Active Member

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    1. Zero the scope in.

    2. Put it in the safe.

    3. Ice shoulder down.

    4. Sell it to someone younger for more money then you paid for it.

    Wayne
     
  15. DecalDude

    DecalDude Active Member

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    I have a Ruger #1 in 338 win mag and I absolutely love it and it will handle anything I can afford to go pull trigger on. From wood chucks to engine blocks will stop em all.

    Jerry Lewis
     
  16. BROWNST100

    BROWNST100 Member

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    .338 Winchester Mag should fill the bill for North America's biggest game. If you want big bore without the magnum punch..try the .35 Whelen.

    Vern
     
  17. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    There is no such thing as justification in your case. Wanna pay around with the big bores then just go for it.
     
  18. 7remmag

    7remmag Member

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    Thanks for the advice everyone. I would really like to know if there are any articles or videoes on proper shooting technique when it comes to larger caliber rifles? I know the 7mm Rem Mag is not that big in the scheme of things, but I do notice that after five to ten shots my shoulder starts to shake. It may just be because I'm not shooting it enough though. Ruger offers their African model #1 in 375 H&H, but my experience with the belted case of the 7mm Rem Mag is that I can only reload a case about 5 times. Since the 375 Ruger is not belted I was hoping that I would be able to reload a case as many times as I can the case of the 257 Roberts. I usually load my rounds with the minimum amount of IMR 3031 listed in the reloading manual so I'm not really planning on loading either round hot. Ruger offers a 338 Ruger and a 300 Ruger that I was trying to look into but I haven't been able to find much information on the two rounds. I have heard that they use a shortened 375 Ruger case, but that's really all I've been able to find.

    Kyle
     
  19. saluki68

    saluki68 TS Member

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    They didn't have the 375 Ruger when I got my 375 over 20 years ago (originally H&H, rechambered to 375 Weatherby about 10 years ago) but a hunting buddy has the 375 Ruger and loves it. For what its worth, I've used the 375 on brown bear, black bear, bison & muskox (plus cape, nile & savannah buffalo, hippo, elephant, leopard, roan & sable in Africa, water buffalo & bantang in Australia and yak in Asia)so I guess you can say I both like it and it does the job on the big stuff. Tom Montgomery
     
  20. dverna

    dverna Active Member

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    Kyle,

    The big ones hurt. I have to use a muzzle brake to load test my .300 Mag.

    When I was a kid I was the range shooting test loads with a .222. The guy on the next bench had an Olympic Grade Browning in .338 Mag. I was getting 5/8" groups and he was shooting 10" patterns off the bench. He asked me to check out his gun to see if there was anything wrong with it.

    The scope was solid and the muzzle was not torn up so I told him it looked OK. He asked me to test fire it and boy was I thrilled - having never fired a big gun before - until I touched one off. The three shoot group was 1 1/2" but not centered. I told him the gun was fine but he needed to adjust his scope to be about 3" high at 100 yards.

    Needless to say, he could not the gun to group and he asked me to finish sighting it in. He was grateful, and asked me if I wanted to shoot another box of ammo out of it. But those 9 shots had been enough.

    I told him he was going to wind up wounding something and he should get a .30/06. If you are recoil sensitive, stay away from the modern big bores. If you want a big hole, get a .35 Remington, .358 Winchester, .38/55 or .45/70. For deer and black bear, they are all you need and case life is better. In the right gun, a .45/70 can deliver a real pounding at both ends - if and when you need it. With the .358, you can even use necked up and trimmed .308 cases.

    Don Verna
     
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