1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

is squinting one-eyed shooting?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by pigkiller, Nov 3, 2010.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. pigkiller

    pigkiller Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2010
    Messages:
    296
    My coach is having me try shooting with one eye closed. Previously, I was squinting one eye (not my dominant) when lining up the beads. Closing one eye seems to be working, and I didn't miss any birds from post 1 today, which sometimes gives me problems. I'm wondering if I have been crossfiring until now. Any thoughts would be appreciated.
     
  2. esoxhunter

    esoxhunter Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2006
    Messages:
    2,056
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    I doubt that I can give you a lot of "factual help"; as I haven't really experimented with this yet. I am having, what I feel is a cross firing problem. It doesn't happen all the time. I have dry fired my gun a ton of times; using this method. I squint my left eye when I set up to shoot. When I am ready to call for the target I open my left eye fully. (I am a right hand shooter and my right eye is my dominant eye) Why my left eye takes over sometimes is beyond me. I am going to start my practice of this method this Saturday at the range to see if this technique is productive . Ed
     
  3. phirel

    phirel TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    9,556
    If blocking one eye in some manner does help your shooting, it is quite possible that you were cross firing.

    Pat Ireland
     
  4. Jawari2000

    Jawari2000 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    141
    There was a detailed thread on this topic a little while ago - use the search function and read it to get a better understanding of this issue. Phil Kiner is probably one of the most informed trap shooter on this issue and he is willing to help others.

    Also, in reality the left or off eye is not taking over but the brain processes the signal sent by the left or off eye. Its not an eye issue but a brain issue. I suggest try blocking the offending eye by taping the lens of your eyeglasses - closing or squinting it tires the muscles and I sometimes open the off eye before shooting thus giving my brain a chance to process the wrong set of images! You can keep the left or off eye open behind the taped eyeglasses without tiring the muscles. As well, a tightly closed eye tends to affect the other (open) eye.
     
  5. esoxhunter

    esoxhunter Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2006
    Messages:
    2,056
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    I forgot to add that I really don't seem to have a problem with trap when I shoot a single target. Where I have the cross dominance problem is when I shoot sporting clays. The 1st target is no problem; where I have a problem is when I go after the 2nd target. That is where my left eye seems to take over, once in a while. Ed
     
  6. Two Dogs

    Two Dogs Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,537
    Try placing a magic-dot on your left lens, it will only stop your left eye from seeing the front bead..

    Hope this helps......
     
  7. wireguy

    wireguy TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,715
    Squinting or closing one eye either is hard work, tiring, and distorts what you are seeing. If closing one eye works, logically taping the lens would too, and it's a lot less tiring.
     
  8. esoxhunter

    esoxhunter Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2006
    Messages:
    2,056
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    I have tried the taped lens trick. Just couldn't adjust at all to that. Hopefully the "squinting" plan will help. However, I very seldom have this happen in trap; it's sporting clays where I have the problem. (On the 2nd bird) My left eye seems to take over when I go after that 2nd target. Thanks. Ed
     
  9. benedict1

    benedict1 TS Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2010
    Messages:
    174
    Jawari2000 has stated the issue. But not the solution in some cases. Kiner is very clear in his video--some people just finally have to close the off eye. I am one of them. I have magic dotted, taped, squinted, etc. Unless I actually close the off eye I crossfire, period. All the advice about not doing it because it reduces visual field, causes tension, etc doesn't mean a thing if you just can't hit the target any other way. Wish it was different, but is not.

    I have even had this happen: I have a completely frosted off eye lens. I can shoot for a few days without closing the off eye. Then I started missing targets behind again and can only hit them by trying visually ridiculous leads. Cross-firing has occurred again. If I start closing my off eye still wearing the frosted lens I immediately start breaking birds with a normal visual look.

    It's a brain image thing for me, clearly. So long as the off eye is open the brain believes it is in the game. Phil Kiner was the one who finally solved this for me with his DVD. Now I just live with it and do it. Good shooting.
     
  10. GeezerGlide

    GeezerGlide TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2010
    Messages:
    137
    There is a method, not new, but not widely recognized for blocking an unwanted eye without loseing your periferal vision and depth perception. It works well for me at trap and sporting clay. Very cheap and easy.Try it on some cheap glasses first. Take a magic marker and make a pattern of dots approximately 1/4" apart on the lens you want to block. It disrupts the eye but doesn't takeout your depth perception. I tried it then took plastic polish and cleaned it off the lens , no damage to the lens. In all fairness I would be cautious testing on a perscription lens. Hope this helps .
    Tryin to breakem all, Jim Poor@Texas Gun Works
     
  11. Jack L. Smith

    Jack L. Smith Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2009
    Messages:
    340
    Pig Killer - to finally answer your question. YES. Any attempt to shift the dominance is forcing (your brain) to try shooting with the other eye. I believe Phil Kiner's quote is - anything that interferes with your vision in one eye is considered as one eyed shooting. Of course, there are many variations that allow different views. I have been to his clinic, (really good), and researched this topic.

    You will get lots of advice (that you didn't ask for) You have to figure out what works for you.

    As jarwai2000 offered, use the seach function here on ts.com for information. try - one eyed shooting, tape lens, cross firing, Kiner eye, etc. Read entire threads and weed it out. Buy Phil Kiner's DVD and if you have a chance, take his clinic.

    js in PA
     
  12. Jawari2000

    Jawari2000 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    141
    Different people cure the issue in different ways - for some the magic dot on the lens works, for others sight blinders work, while for some closing the offending eye behind a frosted or taped lens works. I have the same issue as benedict1-I can cross fire occasionally even with a fully taped lens when the off eye is open. And this happens on stations 4 & 5 on hard right targets even though I am right-hand shooter with my right eye dominant (right-hand shooters with dominant right eye who cross fire will usually cross fire on hard left targets from stations 1 & 2). So, I close the off eye, which is already behind the taped lens - found this solution during Phil Kiner's clinic (his video analysis is quite revealing!).

    The first step toward the solution is to realize that one is cross firing - I think a lot of shooters don't know they are cross firing and continue to ignore the occasional mystery miss, especially when they think the target should've broken. This maybe because cross firing occurs randomly, creeps up with age or changes in health, or fatigue, etc.

    The second step is to try the variety of ways to find what works for oneself with the realization that what works for your buddy may or may not work for you. Some solutions might work for a time but then fall apart (as described by Benedict1 above). Find out what works for you and "keep an eye" on it to make sure it keeps working.

    Sorry this is a little long but hopefully helpful to those struggling with this issue. All good.
     
  13. shootsome

    shootsome Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2007
    Messages:
    244
    My experience was the same as Benedict1's post. I still cross fired after taping the lens of the off-eye even though it couldn't see the target through the tape? I wouldn't believe that was possible under those circumstances. Who knows but closing my left eye (right hand shooter) works for me all the time and eliminates cross firing.
     
  14. pigkiller

    pigkiller Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2010
    Messages:
    296
    Thanks all for the great feedback--this has been quite revealing.

    Here's the deal. I have taped off the lens and then tried a frosted lens. At that point in time, my scores dropped, so I switched back to squinting and tried shooting a high gun. That wasn't too bad, but as time passed it became clear that my tendency was to lower the gun hold; somehow that's what I felt comfortable with. Or maybe it was because I could read the bird better that way.

    Then I switched to a release trigger. The transition was unusually smooth; I began to shoot faster. However, I also started to shoot prematurely (maybe it's an age thing) and started missing slight angles. I also frequently missed birds on post 1, which I found puzzling. HOWEVER, now that I have completely shut off the left eye, those misses on post 1 are a rarity. My suspicion is that I have been crossfiring all along.

    Benedict1 made a good point--maybe going back to the frosted lens is not the solution. Squinting, naturally, stresses the eyes, and will result in misses at some point or another, I suspect. Maybe that's what has been keping me back from that 100 straight all along, though God knows I have come close. So I guess I'm going to Nora Ross it for awhile on this one and completely shut my left eye and see what happens in competition. So far, the scores have been consistently decent and the breaks hard.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Search tags for this page

one eye shooting squint

,

patch vs squinting for shotgun shooting

,

shooting squinting