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Is heavier always better in a trap gun?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by rbmtrap, Dec 29, 2009.

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  1. rbmtrap

    rbmtrap Member

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    Assuming that the weight is well balanced (whatever that might be, but to your liking), all thing being equal is a heavier gun always better than a lighter one? (let's say same gun just a pound or two heavier - or lighter) Is there a disadvantage to having a heavier gun - such as holding and extra pound or two or three all day - fatigue?



    Thoughts / comments?
     
  2. KEYBEAR

    KEYBEAR Active Member

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    No No No . A gun that fit,s you will have less felt recoil . You add weight because the gun kicks it kicks because it don,t fit ??
     
  3. don q

    don q TS Member

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    I've been shooting a factory TM-1 since 1981 which weights 8lb+ and never had a prob with recoil, prob because the gun fits me. Right after my wife bought it for me I had a stock guy fit it to me. She's the best thing ever and so is the P-gun. Only had Giacomo go through it once. I think it is your physical ability as to how heavy a gun you can shoot. don q
     
  4. spitter

    spitter Well-Known Member TS Supporters

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    Trap typically employs heavier loads, which is why trap guns are usually a heavier firearm. In determining actual recoil, the weight of the firearm is a factor in the equation - so a heavier gun lessens actual recoil, all other factors being equal...

    Whether or not you may find that "better" is subjective.

    Regards,

    Jay
     
  5. Old Cowboy

    Old Cowboy Active Member

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  6. miketmx

    miketmx Well-Known Member

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    I'm now a Senior Vet and the unweighted TMX is as heavy as I can handle.
     
  7. KEYBEAR

    KEYBEAR Active Member

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    I shoot a Silver Seitz at 8.5lb with very little recoil . I had a Bowen at 8.6 that kicks like mule . Weight has little to do with how a gun kicks you . You put weight in a gun because it don,t fit and kicks .

    Sarge I said just what i ment . I it fits it don,t kick i don,t care if it is only 7lb. We would be better off if we bought a 500 dollar gun with 1000 dollar wood that fit
     
  8. Pull & Mark

    Pull & Mark Well-Known Member

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    I read in a shooting mag. a while back that the ave. weight for a clay target shooting gun is 8 pounds to 8 l/2 pounds for the general public. This was done by gun companyies trying to find a good stardard weight taking recoil and the fatigue of a too heavy gun into the mix. Of course we are not all ave. Kolars are just over 10 pounds for O/U. Some find this to heavy and others thrive on them. You have to find out what works for you. Good Luck and Break-em all. Jeff
     
  9. ivanhoe

    ivanhoe Well-Known Member

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    Well I guess it must be me but the OP didn't say one thing that would lead me to believe he was talking about recoil.

    Just as he hasn't come in to say he was or wasn't. All I can say is I am a heavy person. I have problems starting a light gun smoothly. So I made mine heavier. Now it starts smoother and swings smooth also. As far as recoil is concerned. My sporting/skeet gun is under 8 lbs and I shoot what ever loads I wish and I couldn't tell you if there is any recoil/kick with any ammo that I shoot. I just don't notice recoil I am not tuned to it.

    Bob Lawless
     
  10. BigM-Perazzi

    BigM-Perazzi Well-Known Member

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    I think the laws of physics just got tossed out the window..

    Where's Neil???
     
  11. rbmtrap

    rbmtrap Member

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    Thanks all. I was looking for general thoughts on benefits and negatives on additional weight. From the above posts I gather reduced recoil (whether an issue or not) and smoother swing are the benefits, and possible fatigue the negative. Did I miss anything?

    Any thoughts on determining when you've got a gun too heavy?

    Thanks!
     
  12. ivanhoe

    ivanhoe Well-Known Member

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    rbmtrap that would depend on just what you want and what you are willing to do to get it.

    By that I mean I wasn't comfortable with the amount of stamina I had after increasing gun weight. So I got a barrel weight it is a brass rod that is machined to fit the chamber and barrel(it has nylon in a couple of places in the barrel for fit)it is about 37" long and only adds a couple of pounds to the gun(on top of the couple of pounds already added to the gun). I worked out with the gun three time a week for several months. No more problems with stamina.

    Bob Lawless
     
  13. rbmtrap

    rbmtrap Member

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    Bob, I like that idea. What was your source for the barrel weight? It's also of interest that you had also added weight to your gun. Why had you done so, and did it have the desired effect?

    Thanks!
     
  14. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    Harlan Campbell shoots a heavy shotgun, I've heard around 14 pounds? Till you build the necessary stamina to handle a heavy trap gun as if it were a lightweight, you can't know the benefits! Harlan can shoot the big loads with about the same felt recoil we feel with our light loads with a fitted stock on our lighter trap guns. I'm in the camp of getting away from as much felt recoil and noise as I possibly can, with my 11-12 pound trap guns!

    Hap
     
  15. highflyer

    highflyer TS Member

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    Lighter guns kick harder. 10 percent more weight, 10 percent less recoil. Heavier guns swing better too. But I don't want a gun so heavy it doesn't handle good. My sporting clays gun weighs slightly over 8 pounds. Heavy enough to swing smooth but light enough to handle. I would think a trap gun could be heavier since the angles are smaller with less gun movement between shots.
     
  16. ivanhoe

    ivanhoe Well-Known Member

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    rbmtrap

    "What was your source for the baarrel weight? It's also of interest that you had also added weight to your gun. Why had you done so, and did it have the desired effect?"

    The source of the barrel weight was from a man that helped me a lot in my earlier shooting. He had it made up and I paid him for that service. I would post a picture of the weight but at the present time. It is not in my possession I lent it to a friend that was recovering from Major Heart Surgery and was trying to get back in shooting shape.

    As far as adding weight to my gun I explained that above but I will tell you again. I am a heavy person. I have problems starting a light gun smoothly. So I made mine heavier. Now it starts smoother and swings smooth also my gun is now in the 11-12 lb range.

    I wish you well no matter what course of action you take. BTW don't dismiss it without trying it. Any weight that you try can be removed if it is done right in the first place. At least if you try you won't wonder what the difference is.

    Bob Lawless
     
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