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Interesting comparison

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by shot410ga, Apr 24, 2007.

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  1. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

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    When a 95 MPH fast ball is thrown to a batter, he has .04 seconds to see and hit the ball. The pitcher is 60' away or 20 yards. A fast shooter from the 27 yard line will call and hit a 40 yard (120ft.) target in .07 of a second. So who has the better eye?
     
  2. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    No question. The baseball player.

    I have batted against major league pitching. It can be humbling.

    Think of it this way; the guys who are "stars" of trap shooting are successful 95-plus percent of the time.

    The guys who are baseball stars are successful 30-plus percent of the time.

    Just my opinion.
     
  3. mixer

    mixer Well-Known Member

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    Unfair comparison. Try turning the trap machine around and have it throw a target at the shooter about 3-4 feet above the ground and see what percentage of targets can be hit.


    Eric
     
  4. Hauxfan

    Hauxfan Well-Known Member

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    Mixer, could I use my barrel as the handle, and my stock as the main part of the bat? lol

    Just wondering!

    I don't think that would work to well. A bat only weighs what, maybe 36 ounces or so, and my gun weighs at least 10 lbs, it would be damn difficult to swing that gun fast enough to hit the ball.

    However, if I bunted every time and could have it out in front of me, I'd say I have a more than even chance of hitting the ball.

    Oh well, all conjecture, as it isn't going to happen. Unless of course, I can borrow Shootlow's gun. Then I'd be more than willing to try it. lol

    Hauxfan!
     
  5. Charles L. Schmidt

    Charles L. Schmidt TS Member

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    Yes I think you mean .4 and .7 (not .04 & .07). But I still disagree, many good shooters take less than .5 seconds from call to shot. cls
     
  6. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    By the way, that 0.4 seconds is the time it takes a 95 mph fastball to reach the plate, once it leaves the pitcher's hand.

    The reaction time to:

    1) recognize what pitch it is (and yes, good batters can tell if it is a curveball, slider, or fastball by reading the seams) and where it is headed

    2) Start the body movement to swing

    3) Decide whether to swing or not

    4) Adjust in mid-swing to make solid contact

    is much less than that 0.4 seconds.

    No contest which is more difficult.
     
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