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Interested in used 410 trap for young shooter

Discussion in 'Want to Buy/Trade Threads' started by James344, Oct 3, 2012.

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  1. James344

    James344 Active Member

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    My father-in-law is looking for a 410 trap gun to purchase for his grandson (7 in the spring) to begin using as soon as he's big enough. Single shot with little recoil preferably since he will only be a beginner. Seller in Ohio would be excellent.

    Jim
     
  2. g7777777

    g7777777 TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Thats not a good idea- get a 20 gauge- you can hit something with that

    I have seen many people go down that road with a 410 and the kids get discouraged

    Go to a pawnshop and buy a used 20 gauge single shot if money is an issue

    Or get a youth Mossberg 500 if you can step up( you can always add to the stock later)

    Or a youth Remington 1100 or a youth Weatherby auto

    Gene
     
  3. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    Second that. The .410 is for the advanced shooter not the beginner. What ever gauge it is, do not buy a gun with an exposed hammer as typically found on the lower cost break open single shots. Young kids cannot operate these hammers safely, also it is a difficult design to shoot well.

    Spend the bucks and get decent equipment because they are worth it. A Remington LT 20 M1100 is a great starter gun and it can be easily operated as a single shot. If that is too much gun then maybe the kid isn't ready for a shotgun.
     
  4. oldgahchamp

    oldgahchamp Active Member

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    A .410 is only good for skeet, chipmunks, squirrels and rats.(up close). Do the kid a favor and go for the 20ga as Gene said. Larry Evans
     
  5. Joe Potosky

    Joe Potosky Well-Known Member

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    If the kid has any weight on him, maybe a 20 at the age of 7, but...
     
  6. oleolliedawg

    oleolliedawg Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    My youngest is 6yo and could barely handle a .410. A 20 GA single would issue way too much recoil for most 7 yo's. Time for a re-think!!
     
  7. 548

    548 Guest

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    I didn't even know you could get a Trap 410. My kid started with a 20ga Wingmaster at 10 years old. This year he is 12 and he is shooting a 12 ga. Special Trap with some decent rounds under his belt. I can't believe it personally, but there was a thread and picture on this site a couple months ago about a 9 and 10 year old set of brothers who both broke a hundred straight at the Grand this year. So obviously the kid will dictate when he's ready; not the calendar.
     
  8. James344

    James344 Active Member

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    What about the Browning Recoiless? I've heard good things about them as far as recoil. His big brother shoots, so he wants to try it too. Obviously I wouldn't want to scare him away from the sport or let him shoot if he isn't ready, but he really wants to at least try it.
    Jim
     
  9. Recoil Sissy

    Recoil Sissy Well-Known Member

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    James344:

    Good on you and grampy for getting the little guy started early and right.
    Count me among those who think a 20 gauge is the way to go. Here's why...

    It's a MAJOR challenge to hit a target with a .410 unless the shooter is already experienced and talented. Starting a younster with a .410 all but guarantees he won't hit squat and has a very discouraging experience.

    If recoil is your concern, Alliant and Hodgdon powder companies both list numerous recipies for 3/4 ounce 20 gauge reloads. Choose one running about 1150 fps and it will be pretty gentle. He can graduate to standard 7/8 oz. loads later. If he isn't ready for light 3/4 oz. loads, you're better to get him a single shot .22 lr and wait a while on a shotgun.

    Browning recoiless are 12 gauge trap guns. One of those would be WAY to heavy for a little guy.

    Best wishes,

    sissy
     
  10. jhmorrisn

    jhmorrisn TS Member

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    I would rather see you start a 7 year old out with a Daisy 99 BB gun. You can start out with Gun Safety, sight picture and trigger control.

    We had a father show up with younger about 7 or 8 years. I just happen to have a 410 with me with out any shell. Another member had less than a box of 410 shell.

    We set the trap the thrower only to throw straight away and set the kid up about a yard behind the trap house. We had him dry fire at several rocks.

    Can't remember exactly how many misses he made before it hit one. But after that first one, he was hitting 2 out of 3.

    I firmly belive that when a younger is big enough to shoot a 20 gauge, they should shoot a 12 gauge. They do not "kick" that much more that a 12 gauge.
     
  11. Mike K P

    Mike K P Member

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    I would put my vote in for a 28 ga. Started my young son years ago on a 20 ga. and recoil was still an issue. Went to a 28 and he started hitting targets and no problem with recoil. If he can hit with a 20 he can hit with a 28, They pattern great. I still shoot one sometimes for fun at trap, no difference in my scores from 16 yds. That's been my experience. Have fun.

    Mike Pracht.
     
  12. Barry C. Roach

    Barry C. Roach Well-Known Member

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    .410's are guns for experts. You may be starting him off too soon. I've seen it many times. The kid gets knocked back a couple of times, even with the .410, and you lose a new shooter. I suggest that you nurture your kid's interest in guns with the BB gun for a while longer. Good luck.
     
  13. steele

    steele TS Member

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    Jim,
    At our club several years ago, we had people bringing their kids to the shoots we had. Most of these kids were 6-10 years old. As most kids, they got bored sitting around. To entertain them a little, I had an old Chipmonk 22 that I brought to the club & loaded it with 22 birdshot & let the kids shoot at balloons lying on the ground. As the kids got better, the stationary balloons weren't any fun. I rigged up an 8' 2x4 to the front of a traphouse & attached springloaded clothes pins to it. I drilled a hole thru the clothespin, thru the 2x4, & ran a string thru it with a knot. I then put helium balloons in the clothespins. I ran the string back to the 16 yard, where the kids stood with the chipmonk. They call "Pull", I pulled a string, & the balloons float up & away & they shot at them. The kids loved it. We set it up to hold 10 balloons, so they shot 2 from each position. We ended up buying 5 Chipmonks & our local gunsmith took off the sights & installed ribs. The kids started their own league & even designed a handicap system. We ended up with about 20 kids. The local welding shop even donated the helium we needed. In the end, we started tying a string to the balloons, to retrieve missed balloons. This is a supervised instruction with a real gun & real ammunition. I've found that air rifles are thought of as toys by most kids. I think the noise might add the realism they need for them to take it seriously.
    Butch from Pgh
     
  14. senorric

    senorric Member

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    At 7 years old, I wholeheartedly vote for the .410. To start a young shooter, better not enough gun than too much. Helps prevent flinching and development of all sorts of bad habits. Been there ---
     
  15. g7777777

    g7777777 TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Browning recoiless is a horrible choice

    Too heavy for most strong adults

    Awkward

    Doesnt work some of the time

    You have to have a gun that

    1. Fits them

    2. That they can hold

    3. That recoil is manageable

    4. That has enough pellets in the pattern to break a target should you shoot at moving targets

    All said that means a youth special auto, maybe a pump or a single shot 20 gauge

    If you dont have the money to buy a youth model- than cut off the stock and purchase an adult used gun

    Regards from Iowa

    Gene
     
  16. lbshootin

    lbshootin Active Member

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    My (now 11) son started with a 26" Remington 870 20ga when he was 8, prior to getting fitted with a mouthful of braces, he was shooting a Berretta 391 with a shortened stock and a 26" barrel in 12ga. Now he is shooting my Winchester 42 in .410 but is really happy hitting 12 to 15..He has been counseled by a couple of good coaches that at this point in time (as long as he has braces)..that shiuldrr time is just as important. He also is shooting his .22lr rifle and has left his .243 jn the safe for now...nothing like recoil into braces to ruin a good, young shooter..he is pretty good with his Daisy as asell!!!!
     
  17. James344

    James344 Active Member

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    The little one has a Daisy BB gun and loves it. He loves going to shoot practices and competitions to watch big brother shoot, but is starting to get itchy about shooting himself. We've told him he needs to grow a little more, but it's getting hard to tell him no. Just want something he can start with just to try it out.
     
  18. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    Youth size gas auto, 3/4 oz loads. Ben was 8 and it worked fine for him.

    If the kid is tiny, wait on the gun, get a Daisy. You can't even pull the trigger with the handle open any more.

    HM
     
  19. cotrshooter

    cotrshooter Member

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    28 is the way to go. Less recoil and still performs well. A 20 ga. still has alot of recoil for a youngser.
     
  20. erock_germany

    erock_germany Member

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    I started with an H&R 20 gauge single shot at age 8 and I was not the biggest back then. The barrels are short and my dad cut and glued a comb on that made it work well for trap.

    You have to cock the buggers but it is good to learn the safety aspect and you can get light 20 gauge loads or roll your own to suit.

    It was the best way to get me on the way.

    Tried the .410 on a skeet field at age 7 at low 7 and high 6 and I just got bummed out and went back to plinking with my .22

    The route with the H&R made it happen and then I went to a 20 gauge in skeet a year later (a mule kicking Winchester 101 at that) and I have been shooting since.

    That was 1973
     
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