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Instant hot water

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by silverado, Feb 12, 2008.

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  1. silverado

    silverado TS Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
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    Yes and even though I'm in it quite often, I am not talking about that now. I was wondering if any of you have installed an instant hot water system in your home. Do you like it, what kind is it, satisfied? thank you.
     
  2. perazzitms

    perazzitms TS Member

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    Worth every penny. Will pay for itself in a matter of weeks with today's gas prices. I have a Rinnai. They work on a 'raise' principle; that is, they are designed to raise the temp of the water a maximum of XX degrees. What that means is in the summer, you will be able to have 3 showers going at the same time. Same in the winter if you don't have it set to 140 degrees. Mine will flow 8.5 GPM at a 35 degree rise, or 6.5 GPM at a 50 degree rise.

    Best thing is the control you have over the temp. If you set it to 108 degrees, you get 108 degree water. I have mine set to 110. When I take a shower, I turn the knob over to full hot. Idea is that the water will only be 110 degrees tops. Why pay to heat water to 140 degrees if you're only going to dilute it with cold water. The hot water heater itself, set to 110, uses next to nothing in the way of gas. Temp is controlled with a pad (or pads) you can put anywhere. Doing laundry - set the pad to 135. Taking a shower -- set it back to 108. Children coming over -- turn it down to 95.

    Believe me, these things are the cat's ass.
     
  3. jackmitch

    jackmitch TS Member

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    i have thought about it but you have to have a 3/4" water line feeding it and if you have a lot of minerals in your water you have to have a softener too. i have an old house with galvanized pipes and hard water.to replace the plumbing add water softener etc i would probably have 4or 5 grand in the system. hard to recover that much rapidly.jackmitch
     
  4. Shooting Jack

    Shooting Jack Active Member

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    Location:
    Blackshear, Georgia
    Back in 1971 when I lived in Fukuoka Japan I had one in my house and thought it was the best thing since peanut butter. After moving back to the states I tried to find one and they were simply outrageous. I haven't checked on one in the last few years but my son installed an electric one in his home in Atlanta. It is the same as the gas one as it has no tank. It was around $1200.00 dollars but works really well. I was amazed at how quick it was to provide heated water. It's supposed to have a 20 year life span. I don't remember the actual name brand but I installed it for him in less than two hours. Jackie B.
     
  5. Bisi

    Bisi TS Member

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    I was getting ready to post the same question. After getting last months heating bill I'm ready to make a change. The tank type water heater I have now is 28 years old.

    I was wondering about the tankless water heaters also. Perazzitms, what size gas line do you have coming into your tankless water heater? The reason I asked, a few years ago I was watching one of those home remodel shows. They replaced the tank type water heater with a tankless type. They said that the tankless water heaters require a bigger gas line than the one feeding most tank type water heaters.

    I have a 1" OD (probably sch 40) black iron gas line. I would think that would supply enough gas.
     
  6. jackmitch

    jackmitch TS Member

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    bisi i know you need 3/4 gas line because it has a modulating gas valve that can burn over 100,000btu. athis time i can't recall how much cause i checked it out 3 or more years ago. when i check it out a plumber i know quoted me a guestimate of $2000.00 for the waterheater no softener, or pipe replacement. that was for the rinnai.jackmitch
     
  7. 12Gagejon

    12Gagejon Member

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    Even plumbers in my area won't put them in there own homes hard water kills them and salt softers are a eco nightmare Jon
     
  8. jevoliva

    jevoliva Member

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    "Believe me, these things are the cat's ass."

    Believe me, I will be using that one for the rest of my life. I had never heard that one before. About fell out of my chair laughing -- then again, it is 11 PM and I getting a little slap happy...
     
  9. tulsey

    tulsey Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
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    I have installed two of the Rinnai external mount units on two rental houses. The first was an experiement and it worked so well we did the second one when that house was vacant. The unit and intall was about $3,000 each. This is higher than doing it inside, but with the required special exhaust venting, not that much more. It created a lot more room inside these two small houses as well as reducing one more fire hazard. Really neat to see the steam cloud outside the house on a cold day when they fire up.

    The tenants have liked them and the supply of water. You have to wait a few seconds for the hot water to start. I cannot comment on what change it made in gas bill since I have not had to pay one once occupied.

    There are a few things to consider. The Rinnai will not work if there is a power failure unless you hook it up to an inverter or generator. Only takes about 100 watts. After getting through without damage during a week long power failure, I am thinking about adding an auto dump to them to make sure if we lose power again they will dump out all the water. Another idea for next time is to have a battery and inverter set up for it. My external units have heat tape on the waterline going to it and of course we lost that heat during the power failure, but it never got that cold. When it has power the unit will cycle a little to keep things unfrozen when not being called upon for hot water.

    The second house where we installed the Rinnai never lost power and the tenant wound up with many friends and relatives who were without power staying there and using the shower. No problems with keeping up with hot water and the tenant told me he will have one on his next house. .

    Funny thing we ran into on an unoccupied house was during the summer we had no gas useage from the Rinnai, no gas useage from the AC/heater, no gas useage from the electronic start stove. The gas company thought there was something wrong with the meter and we had to have a visit from the field crew who just shook their heads and said they would tell the office the meter was fine.

    I will install one at my house next time one of the water tanks goes out. Since my house has two tanks in two closets I probably will go with one Rinnai to replace both tanks and will gain one storage closet unless I go with the external mount and then gain two closets.

    I am sold on them.
     
  10. ricks1

    ricks1 TS Member

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    great if you have gas price one for electric WOW rick
     
  11. chessney

    chessney TS Member

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    The one I have is a Bosch. I love it. It cut my summer gas bill so low that I can shoot a little more. Make sure that you select a unit with a hydro ignition. This means you have no standing pilot to waist gas. The hydro unit works with water flow like a power plant on a river....Ziggy
     
  12. Trap2

    Trap2 Well-Known Member

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    3,685
    Location:
    Redding, California
    I am in the business of selling these units, and have been for years, so I have a pretty good handle on the pro's and con's of the costs of installing them. For the most part, the cost of the unit, the special stainless steel venting required, running the condensate lines to an outside drain, upsizing the gas line, and the installation will be more than the average homeowner with 4 people will ever recover. The return on investment of a tankless heater can run as high as 10 years or so, depending on the cost of materials and installation. If you are planning on staying in your present home for that length of time, the payback may be there, but, remember this: The average lifespan of these units are only about 7 years, so you can plan on replacing it long before it pays for itself. The installation of a new, high energy gas water heater with R/20 insulation, set at 100 degrees, with an added water heater blanket would be a much wiser, and much more economical choice, and should last 10 years or more. If you are considering one of these units seriously, do all the research you can before investing in it. There is a wide range of information available on the web concerning these and it is very important that you learn all you can before making your decision.....Just my experience...Dan Thome (Trap2)
     
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