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increase eye perscription?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by himejim, Mar 18, 2009.

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  1. himejim

    himejim Member

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    At 55 my vision has been the same for the past 8 years. I get my vision tested yearly and I always expect that I will need new lenses because I don't really see clearly. I don't have bad vision as I don't even need glasses to drive. But, glasses do clear things up.

    My question is, has anyone deliberatly increased the magnification in their perscription lenses? Did it seem to help you pick up the bird faster or more clearly track the bird?

    Thanks for your input. Jim
     
  2. ke4yyd

    ke4yyd Member

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    Perhaps your loss of fine vision lately is due to emerging cataracts. New RX will usually not help much if that is the problem.
     
  3. skeet_man

    skeet_man Well-Known Member

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    if you haven't already, talk to your optometrist, and explain to him that you shoot clay targets. I believe the focus point can be adjusted to 20-30 yds, as opposed to infinity that it is normally set to.

    Also, if they know that you need something specific, they may try to get your prescription a little more precise, not "close enough" that the general public gets.

    Last time i had an eye exam, doctor told me that I didn't need a new prescription. I asked her if I could go up -.25 in my left eye (I shoot LH) because I noticed the vision in that eye wasn't quite as sharp as my right, and she told me sure, you actually could go up anyways, but they didn't normally bother changing a script for such a small incremental change. Also, forget lenscrafters, sterling optical, ect, those places are the walmart of the optical trade (and don't even think about going to walmart LOL), i'm sure theres some fine optometrists working there, but they are about quantity, not quality, and "close enough" is going to be good enough for 99% of the public, so they are not setup to cater to the 1% that has specific requirements. Talk to shooters in your area, and see who they have used and have had good luck with, someone who is a shooting glasses dealer who can do custom scripts for them would be a good place to start, even if your not going to get prescription glasses, they will be able to help you out more than someone that has no clue about shooting and its requirements.
     
  4. Rollin Oswald

    Rollin Oswald Active Member

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    You might also consider visiting an ophthalmologist rather than an optometrist. Opthalmologists are medical doctors and vision and eyes are their specialty.

    Rollin
     
  5. RobertT

    RobertT Well-Known Member

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    Not to berate your opthamologist since I am unaware of his or her credentials but great strides have been made in recent years in the field of opthemology. Optometrists who keep pace with the most recent tecnology are the ones you want to consult. Too many today are old school and have not kept up with advancements in their proffession. Another consideration is the quality of the lenses, it can be critical. Consider the difference between a high dollar scope and a cheap one.

    Robert
     
  6. gun fitter

    gun fitter TS Member

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    Rollin- I beg to differ! An ophthalmologist is a MD true But an optometrist who is current is probably better unless you need surgery. An ophthalmologist is a Medical Doctor first and then serves a residency in their specialty. That means they have two years of training in vision and eyes and a large portion of that time is spent in a surgical rotation.


    An Optometrist is a Doctor just not a Medical Doctor. They spend 4 years studying the structure and disease of the eye. So they leave school with more practical experience. Today's Optometrists if properly certified Can treat diseases of the eye and prescribe both oral and topical medications just like a doctor. Years ago that was not the case. years ago DO's were not considered real doctors either but today some of the finest physicians and surgeons are no longer MD's they may be a DO.

    Just thought you should know!

    Joe
     
  7. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Joe- I did a Google search of the curriculum of two schools of optometry. I was impressed. I had believed that Optometrists were restricted to correcting vision with lens and Ophthalmologist specialized in treating diseases of the eye. You are correct, the two fields seem to be getting closer but Ophthalmologists have little background in vision correction with lens.

    Pat Ireland
     
  8. Mojo

    Mojo Member

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    Jim - check out Trivex lenses. They are far better than poly.
     
  9. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    You should think about having a cloudy day perscription and a sunny day perscription. When your pupil contracts due to sunlight your vision improves. When it dialates in low light your vision decreases. HMB
     
  10. Tailbuster

    Tailbuster TS Member

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    Hi Jim,

    The correct answer is; if you are corrected, as good as you can get, at optical infinity (greater than 20 feet) then that is as good as it gets. Increasing or decreasing the Rx from that point will only make things worse. Now, what you might try. When you see your optometrist, let them know that your distance clarity is maximally important. Perhaps, put up the 20/15 line as your goal. Now, everybody has a natural limit of their best visual acuity. For many people it is 20/15, for many it is 20/20 and some can only achieve 20/25 or worse. Many, many things contribute to this and guessing is only speculation. Ask your optometrist.
     
  11. gun fitter

    gun fitter TS Member

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    Some can see 20/10 but its rare uncorrected. If you have any dominance issues especially if it is when fatigued you might try making the shooting eye see one line better than the off eye. It helps for some.
     
  12. idoc

    idoc Member

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    Jim,

    Tailbuster is right on.
     
  13. DocJim

    DocJim Member

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    I have been told the same thing as Tailbuster wrote by my ophthmologist. ..AJ
     
  14. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    One solution fits all. I don't think so. Vision is something that can be fine tuned for each individual. HMB
     
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