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In hot weather don't forget the outdoor workers

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by senior smoke, Jul 16, 2013.

  1. senior smoke

    senior smoke Well-Known Member

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    In hot weather don

    Hello:
    It has been really hot in the Milwaukee area recently. My father retired from the city of Milwaukee sanitation department after 38 years. He told me when I was a boy how nice it was to have someone on his route bring the men and him something to drink on a very hot day.

    I brought out three cold Cokes this morning for the sanitation crew. I can not tell you how appreciative they were.

    With all the construction in and around the Milwaukee area the work must be very difficult especially in weather like this. I gave a young construction worker a cold Coke yesterday while I was at a stop light and he said that's exactly what he needed.

    Same thing for your mailman or woman. I was lucky sitting in an air conditioned office through out my working career. I can only imagine what it must be like for people who work outside in extreme heat and extreme cold.

    If you work outside for a living, what is the hottest temperature you ever worked on the job? Also if your in the cold part of the country how cold of temperature did you have ever to work on your job?

    My dad said they had to work in warm weather no matter the temperature, but the coldest they were allowed to work in was -9 degrees. What's worse working in extreme heat or cold?
    Steve Balistreri
    Wauwatosa Wisconsin
     
  2. poppat

    poppat Member

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    I work for AT@T we work no matter what the temp.
    Terry
     
  3. mixer

    mixer Well-Known Member

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    Shooting a commercial in Chicago in the winter on the Michigan Ave bridge. It was -26f with the wind chill. The film broke in the camera after being outside for less than two minutes and cables became stiff as boards.


    Eric
     
  4. darr

    darr Well-Known Member

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    When I was younger I routinely worked in temps above 110 for long hours. Now I routinely stay in an air conditioned tractor or pick up while it's 110.


    Darr
     
  5. Hammer1

    Hammer1 Active Member

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    .

    We always brought ice cold whole watermelons to the folks working in the hay fields.

    .
     
  6. Catpower

    Catpower Molon Labe TS Supporters

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    Since I have been in the HVAC bidness for about 40 years, I have worked in some extreme weather. The hottest place I worked was in an attic, one job was a no cooling call when I got the I had no 24 volt control voltage, so I had to go to the attic where the furnace was (I still think they should shoot the idiot that ever thought that up) but the reason there was no control voltage was the limit switch on the furnace was open, and it was a 180 degree limit so it was over 180F up there, I opened the door so the cool (hot) air in the house would come up through the return and it reset. I have never understood why anybody would have a jet black roof but that house did, and no vents

    The coldest was before I dumped all the side like work and concentrated on HVAC work I also did water well work, pulling a submersible pump at -25 wasn't much of a party, it was 750 ft deep and my rig would pull 38 feet at time, when I took the joints apart the water in the drop pipe would freeze immediately, and the 50-60 degree water felt warm on my exposed skin


    Given the choice of either of those two, I want none, but I would rather work in the heat than the cold, I hate cold weather
     
  7. Stl Flyn

    Stl Flyn Well-Known Member

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    Steve,

    Go outside right now, and just sit in the sunlight for 15 minutes. Let me know what you think of this 90 degree heat, with a 76 degree dew point. At least that is what it is here 25 miles northwest of you. Then think of doing a labor type job in it. I think the extreme cold is allot more tolerable, and can be dealt with easier, as far as body comfort. The cold is definitely more trying on the mind though, with the tools and equipment problems.

    Here in Wisconsin you only get about a month total of perfect working weather, and that would be around mid September - mid October mostly, IMO. Our house goes from heat, to air conditioning, back to heat with maybe a week total of open windows in between.
     
  8. shannon391

    shannon391 Active Member

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    I worked fire brick for years, fire and brim stone boys!

    I now run a small masonry biz, not getting easier with age.
     
  9. butcher

    butcher Member

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    Try working in a forge shop or foundry with the weather 90 degrees outside.
     
  10. Shooting Sailor

    Shooting Sailor Well-Known Member

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    You can dress for the cold, but employers usually frown on their employees stripping off enough to be really comfortable in the heat.

    It was 86 on my deck today, before 0900, but after doing yardwork until about 1500, I was very happy to dive into the swimming pool at 88 degrees. After about 10 minutes of soaking, I started to cool down.
     
  11. need to shoot more

    need to shoot more Active Member

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    I am with Catpower I have been in the HVAC business since 1982 and we work in and at the most uncomfortable times and areas. I am a teacher of the trade now but spent yesterday ( 98 degrees )and will follow up today completing a ductless install.Lots of water some fruit and a slow pace, I said to myself yesterday ( this is a young mans trade ) at times.
     
  12. DONNE

    DONNE Member

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    While you're enjoying your AC, think about where the electricity that runs it comes from. Most likely a coal fired generating station running 24 hrs a day 7 days a week 365 days a year. Try working next to a boiler generating 2400 psi 1050 deg. steam. I assure you, you'll have a little taste of hell.

    Not to mention the A-holes you have deal with pushing you. Glad I'm out of there !!!!

    BUT, I'll take hot weather over cold anytime. Sure, hot makes you uncomfortable, but cold will kill you.
     
  13. senior smoke

    senior smoke Well-Known Member

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    I remember when the a/c would go out at work at the bank and how everyone thought how bad we had it.

    After reading some of these stories of what some of you go through at work, It's amazing that you can survive a days work in this heat and cold.

    One interesting comment I received from a PM. The guy said if you work out in the elements all the time most do not live a long retirement. He felt the weather takes it's toll on people.
    Steve
     
  14. Hookedonshooting

    Hookedonshooting TS Member

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    20 years old, working at a UPS Sort facility in Ohio in July and August. Loading 6000-10000 boxes, just right, into an empty trailer thats been sitting in the sun all day. Literally was an oven. Glad it was only for 4 hours. My boots would squish from the sweat. The day my parents heard that squishing sound in my boots when i got home from work was the day i officially earned the "work ethic respect" from my father.
     
  15. wpairishshot

    wpairishshot Member

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    I am a firefighting instructor, I am doing a live burn on Friday. The first time I did one of these in this weather, it was strange because when you first come out after being in the burn building it actually felt cool, of course until you adjust and remember just how stinking hot it really is outside. They often told me we were the crazy ones going in when everyone else is coming out, but to put on all the gear and breathing apparatus, well its just damn hot.
    Everyone stay cool, my AC unit will be working OT on the way home-guaranteed!
     
  16. Hauxfan

    Hauxfan Well-Known Member

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    When I was 15 I got a job at an ice cream factory.

    They had one quick freeze freezer that was set at -32 degrees.

    Before the summer ended, I could work an hour in there before I had to go out.

    As for working in a hot place.

    That would be putting up loose hay in the barn in the heat of July or August.

    Never knew what the temperature was, but I do know it was hot and there was no air moving in that hay loft.

    Hauxfan!
     
  17. Catpower

    Catpower Molon Labe TS Supporters

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    Hauxfan, I have been in both of those situations too, but we were stacking bales in the barn, some of the farmers still used the hook and rail thing to get them there it was nice but was real dirty especially when they were baling red clover after it had been rained on, that was some nasty stuff

    And I have worked in blast freezers, it used to be a real shock to my system going from 35 below to 100 out side then back and forth until you got everything ginning the way it was supposed to, and to put the ammonia leaks on top of it, they sure cleared out your sinuses, but it wasn't really anything new as we put on literally tons of anhydrous ever spring when I was working on my Dad's farm
     
  18. Hauxfan

    Hauxfan Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, Catpower! I had forgot about the ammonia leaks.

    They really got to me when I first started, but after a couple of months, I was as though a person builds up some kind of immunity.

    Probably not, probably just got more used to breathing that stuff.

    The place I worked was Potter's Ice Cream in Waterloo, Ia.

    Only one summer, but bought my first .22 rifle with the money I saved.

    Wish I still had the rifle.

    Hauxfan!
     
  19. wireguy

    wireguy TS Member

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    Throughout my career as a service electrician I have worked in attics during the summer afternoons in southern California. I would lift the crawl space cover up and the heat would hit like something physical. It was monstrous. I wore a rubber dust mask to keep the fiberglass dust out of my lungs. I was sweating so hard that every 30 seconds I would have to pull the bottom, where it went under my lower lip, away from my face and drain the water because the collected sweat would quickly build up to a depth where I was breathing it into my mouth. Some of those situations were actually potentially deadly and I was totally alone. If I had collapsed up there I would have simply lain there and died. I'm 61 and as recently as a year ago I was doing that. I hope to not have to any more.
     
  20. senior smoke

    senior smoke Well-Known Member

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    Hookedonshooting:
    I worked at UPS in Elm Grove Wisconsin, near Milwaukee Part time washing trucks. I hated it.
    Steve

    Some of you have had some very hard jobs. Now I understand why my father would say that I was a pencil pusher working at the bank and that I did not know what real work was.

    One of my grandfather's was from Sicily. He worked at International Harvester in Milwaukee in the foundry. During the summer he would tell me stories how workers collapsed at work as it would get to 129 degrees and higher.
    Steve