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I need a cold weather 7/8 oz load.

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Quack Shot, Oct 26, 2007.

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  1. Quack Shot

    Quack Shot Active Member

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    Any appropriately fast burning powder in ENOUGH quantity would help to solve the problem. I would also try a hotter primer, making sure to adjust the powder charge accordingly. Red Dot, Promo, Clays, Clay Dot, and a host of other powders would work well. I've used 700-X, but in slightly heavier loads and charges. You also failed to say what hull you are using, so I can't give you a very specific recommendation or answer your question regarding wads or powder reliably. I can tell you that IMR/Hodgdon has data listed for many 700-X loads using the Federal 209A primer. It's done pretty well in many loads at lower temps.

    Just some information to consider. Your powder charge in a popular hull with a similar primer and wad would have a hard time getting over 7000 PSI at normal temperatures. I usually look to produce somewhere closer to 9000.

    Some powder and primer combinations have given me trouble in colder weather. I test them, over a chronograph, right from the freezer. You'd be surprised at how poorly some loads and combinations do. Even some factory loads have been horrible at cold temps. Sometimes changing the wad can make a difference also. If the wad is a poor fit for the hull, it can have an effect as well.

    I have not tested the Cheddite Primer extensively in cold weather, so I can't guide you there either. I would think that it's similar to the Winchester Primers performance, but do not have anything to verify that. The very few loads I tested using Cheddites worked fine in colder temps, but it was a heavier payload and different powder.
     
  2. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Quack Shot- Testing shells at cold temperatures will reveal some facts that would surprise many as you noted.

    You also mentioned a wad that fits the hull poorly will cause problems at lower temperatures. I have also found that true at warmer temperatures. I am surprised that many use a tapered wad in a hull with straight walls.

    Pat Ireland
     
  3. washandwear

    washandwear Member

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    I used the following last winter without issue in central WI.

    AA Hull
    Fed 209A Primer
    16.5 grs Red Dot
    Gray Winchester Wad
    7/8oz shot
     
  4. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Put a hand warmer in your pocket to keep the shells warm, that way you can use the same load all year long. HMB
     
  5. zzt

    zzt Well-Known Member

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    I am a particular fan of Red Dot and 12S0 wads for 7/8ox loads in STS hulls. A couple of winters ago I decided to experiment with low velocities. I loaded 14.7gr of Red Dot (as low as I could coax my loader to throw) in an STS hull, with a 12S0 wad and 7/8oz #7 1/2 magnum. I can't recall whether I used an STS209 or W209 primer, but it was certainly one or the other.

    It was a magnificent performer. I shot it all winter with no bloopers, no unusual powder residue, and no other anomalies. At around 45 deg F it patterned at 99% PE @ 40 yards. The load was subsonic.

    Sometimes, a smaller powder charge can increase pressures. In this case, because of the wad used. The 12S0 wad has an almost imperceptible taper. The base diameter is appreciably larger than the .690" of a TGT or Fig-8 wad. It is stopped by the internal taper of the STS hull and does not seat on the powder (unless there is a lot of it). It is essentially jammed in and makes a noticeable annular ring in the hull wall. Since the wad does not initially move as easily as a Rem wad, pressure builds until it reaches a point the wad will move. If you study Alliant's data you will see several instances where a lighter powder charge has a higher pressure than a larger amount of the same powder does with the same wad. e3 behaves similarly with the same components.
     
  6. redhawk44

    redhawk44 Member

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    I use the F207-A primer exclusivly and have never had an ignition problem right down to the 20s.

    Try it, you may like it.
     
  7. BILL GRILL

    BILL GRILL Well-Known Member

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    tshooter92 buy 100 win 209 or federal primers and try it. I think you will find your load will work fine with just a primer change? Bill
     
  8. chipking

    chipking TS Member

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    16.5 e3 Rem TGT12 wad Win AAHS hull Win 209 primer. about 1225-1250 fps and the pressure is high enough (above 8000psi)for a clean consistant burn. Last year I shot these loads in our bluenose match with temps at 14 degrees and a wind chill in the negative numbers with no ammo problems at all.
    --- Chip King ---
     
  9. DoRaMa

    DoRaMa Member

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    TShooter92

    I have spent sometime with cold / frozen shells and the test gun. What hull are you using and how deep is the crimp?

    Kevin @ 402-463-3145
     
  10. Pull & Mark

    Pull & Mark Well-Known Member

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    TShooter92, I am assumeing you have tried a number of the older type powders out there. You may want to try a brand new powder called Win.AA Lite. It is a special powder made for lite loads and slow loads. It works best on 7/8 oz. loads and one oz. loads as well. You can talk to a Hodgdon rep. and get your questions answered before you buy some. Hope this gets you through the winter months. Break-em all. Jeff
     
  11. Cold Iron

    Cold Iron Active Member

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    TShooter92 I’d take Kevin up on that offer of a phone call, it would be well worth it. FWIW a medium crimp is not a metric you want to use in cold weather. I doubt you can tell a ten thousands difference in crimp depth by eye, and that can be the difference between bang and fizzle.
     
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