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I been hunting - Pics!

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by biff, Jan 10, 2010.

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  1. biff

    biff Active Member

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    My shooting season has ended and I have been hunting!
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    These were found after walking and walking in tilled fields after some heavy rains we had. These were the only complete ones I found, but I have a gallon jug of broken and chipped pieces. I had always liked getting out and walking fields when I was a kid, back then our garden patch was rich with complete points and got my interest. Next are some points I found in the 1950's in Rockcastle County Kentucky in our garden.
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    This was the very first point found post trap season and I consider it one of the most beautiful points I have found.
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    Last is a Clovis point I acquired, however but finding them is very special as many of these points are close to 10,000 years old as is this Clovis point! When I find them, there is something special in the feeling that the last human hand to touch the point I pick up was the hand of a man thousands of years ago. Hope you like looking at them. Biff
    [​IMG]
     
  2. wireguy

    wireguy TS Member

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    Awsome
     
  3. powderburn

    powderburn Member

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    What atrists these early people were! We've found many in our garden at home in Indiana. The garden is 50 yds long by 30 yds wide. Many are so tiny, they had to be for birds or fish. Makes you wonder where the river bed really was back then, and how different things looked. Thanks for sharing!
    -powderburn
     
  4. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    My nephew is into arrowhead hunting, too. He lives in Juniata County, Pennsylvania and hunts the farms around Thompsontown. I gave him a solid copper bar that looked like it might have been an old grounding bar. I forget what he told me he needed it for but it was something regarding arrowheads and he said it works great.

    He also displays his collection with great pride.

    Ed
     
  5. short shucker

    short shucker TS Member

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    I too used to walk plowed fields a lot in seach of arrow heads and such. I found a few every year and somehow managed to give them away. I still have the corn grinding stones that I found one day in an old shed I was tearing down. It took me a minute to realize what they were.

    Thanks for the great pictures.

    ss
     
  6. Auctioneer

    Auctioneer Well-Known Member

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    When I was a kid there was a field that got tilled up for corn every year. I heard later that you could go down there and find arrowheads. Like I said when I was young and had other things to do. Now I wish I did. It was a place when the indians used as a camp site for years. They have not farmed that area for some time. Every time I go by I lok and see what they are doing to the area. I'm hoping that they will till it up again.
     
  7. stokinpls

    stokinpls Well-Known Member

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    Makes you wonder who made them all.
     
  8. Shooting Jack

    Shooting Jack Active Member

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    Those are pretty awsome Biff. I have never found any whole arrowheads and have hunted them quite a bit down here. I used to walk the rivers a lot and found their old camps. I am inland about thirty five miles and found campsites where they would bring oysters from the coast to the villages. Most of the areas were grown over and was hard to find anything else but found some large rocks that were used as work benches and also for food preparation(so I was told). The piles of oyster shells would often be quite large, now only a foot or so high buy maybe 30 feet wide. Jackie B.
     
  9. handlepuller

    handlepuller Well-Known Member

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    That is awesome. I always try to keep my eyes open but never have found one.
     
  10. Dahaub

    Dahaub Active Member

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    You have some very nice arrow heads there. In my whole life I've stumbled across three whole points and one spearpoint. I have found a few other artifacts but none intact or nearly as nice as your finds. The Clovis point is really nice and appears to be sharp too. Thanks for sharing. Dan
     
  11. wireguy

    wireguy TS Member

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    I once spent the night camping under a boulder the size of a 2 story house in the California desert. On one side of the boulder was a granite shelf that sat about 2 feet above grade. Around that shelf were millions of obsidian shards. One could see that the bench had been used for probably hundreds of years to make arrow heads. There were hand prints and such made from native materials on the boulder.
     
  12. highflyer

    highflyer TS Member

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    I was looking at arrow heads in a museum a couple of months ago. They were from a pre-white man pre-horse village on the plains by a river. Most of the arrow heads were small with very few large ones. I imagine they killed a lot more small game to eat than large game. Small game might not be as glamorous but it is usually more abundant.
     
  13. Auctioneer

    Auctioneer Well-Known Member

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    A friend on Tangier Island in Va usto trap muskrats in the marsh. While in there he would always look at any rocks that might be sticking out or laying there. He had about 50 + arrowheads. From small to about 6 inches long.
     
  14. hmrgun

    hmrgun Member

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    Biff, very nice collection. They look very similar to the ones that have been in my familiy from my Grandfathers farm in southern Illinois. The farm was in Murphysboro, about 170 miles from your location, and about 38 miles from Sparta. I only have seven of the hundreds that were handed down to different familiy members. My Dad visited the farm during WW2 and said that you would find them on the surface after a good rain. The familiy let the University of Southern Ill excavate the farm at some point because it was so rich in all kinds of artifacts. I'll try to post photos, but I'm not the best!

    Cliff
    [​IMG]
     
  15. Frank C

    Frank C Well-Known Member

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    It seems odd that these arrow heads are always found with coins......
     
  16. samiam03

    samiam03 Member

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    You are one very lucky man to find a Clovis point. I can just imagine it being used to bring down a Mastodon or Buffalo.

    Sam
     
  17. front242

    front242 Member

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    LOL @ Frank C!
     
  18. biff

    biff Active Member

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    Thanks everyone for the interest and nice replies!

    Yes Frank, if I keep finding them with those shiny new dimes.....why I may even be able to shoot some trap this summer. I started to put a shotgun shell with these points for scale, but that surely would have brought out that "Gee, they even had shotguns!" I did think that was a very astute observation and I liked it!!!

    I did not find the Clovis point in the field, but rather I purchased it from someone reputable. There are people out there who can "knap" points that are beautiful and impossible to tell from an authentic artifact. With the price that some of the beautiful pieces of "art" are selling for, there are and will be people who can and will be forgerying these points. That is why I don't really want to buy a point since there are so many fakes, but when I find them myself while searching a field I know they are authenic. Also I just feel the joy of that past connection and have so much admiration for the people who made these and were able to subsist with them for their survival!

    Eddie and Cliff you have some very beautiful points! I think the reason they call them artifacts is because no two are alike and the beauty of the craftsmanship Thanks to everyone for looking! Biff
     
  19. DONNE

    DONNE Member

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    biff , great looking stuff ! Kentucky is know for good artifacts. The people had great raw materials to work with. However calling all points Arrowheads is technically incorrect . Back East here , most of the native Americans were gone before the true "bow and arrow" were in common use. They used a weapon called an Atlatl and the projectile was a dart. The darts had quite a bigger point than an arrowhead and the natives were quite proficient with them. In any case , lots of fun finding perfect points . No-til & No Trespassing has detered me for the last few years. But I still have all brother and I found when we were kids . Thanks for showing !
     
  20. highflyer

    highflyer TS Member

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    Not really odd that they are found with coins. Did you think they gave them away?
     
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