1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

Hunting with my Trap Gun

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by timb99, May 7, 2011.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    7,328
    Location:
    Shawnee, Kansas, USA
    Well, since its the only gun I have over here, its kind of my only option. Shot ring necked doves and rock pigeons. Rockies, as they're called over here, are speed demons, and skittish. They'll make crazy turns when they hear a shot.

    Hunted near Pienaarsrivier, in Limpopo Province, South Africa.

    These are ring necked doves.

    timb99_2008_03033.jpg


    timb99_2008_03034.jpg
     
  2. James L Balog

    James L Balog Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    285
    I would also pheasant and dove hunt with my perazzi aswell when I still had it.
     
  3. wireguy

    wireguy TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,715
    timb 99, America is pretty much awash with ring necked "collared" Eurasian doves now too. They were brought in to the Bahamas and made the short flight to Florida and they have spread from there to "if they aren't there yet they soon will be". Do they mostly hang out around man made structures over there like they do here? Here's a picture of Molly Mae fetching one off a canal.Have you eaten any?
    [​IMG]
     
  4. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    7,328
    Location:
    Shawnee, Kansas, USA
    Wireguy,

    They're everywhere. City, country.

    I haven't eaten any yet.
     
  5. wireguy

    wireguy TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,715
    Sporting Clays magazine just did a little write up about them and the author says they don't appear to be a threat to our native Mourning Doves because they don't share the same habitat very much. So far here they have made a nice addition to the native dove population.
     
  6. William681

    William681 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2006
    Messages:
    198
    Location:
    Southport NC
    I have always used a "Trap Gun" for Pheasant, rising bird going away, (duh).
    Shoot for the eye, or the beak. You look at the front of the clay don't you?
    Too many Pheasant hunters see that big tail and end up shooting behind the bird.
    Same goes for rabbits, ignore the tail, shoot the ears, more open choke though. A good bunny busting Beagle makes it easy, moves the bunny at a slow lop, 50 yards ahead of the howls, as the howls come back in your direction, time to watch.
    My newest Beagle got her first snake. Fortunately a harmless corn snake. Although she did a good job. grabbed it behind the head and shook the living s--t out of it, still, I am thankful it was not a Copperhead or Rattler.

    Bill
    Southport NC
     
  7. CalvinMD

    CalvinMD Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    9,857
    Location:
    Northeastern MD @ the top o the Bay
    Speaking of nasty reptiles...I hope Wireguys pretty pup was not swimming in a canal full o gators!
     
  8. wireguy

    wireguy TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,715
    No gators out west but Molly Mae did once follow a rattler in. The current swept it behind a bush with her in hot pursuit so just before it disappeared I shot it. Missed it's head but I guess the water compression killed it. Sure enough here she came out from behind that big bush swimming with the current with that rattler in her mouth. She is a fierce retriever.
     
  9. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    7,328
    Location:
    Shawnee, Kansas, USA
    William681,

    A friend of mine has a saying, "shoot em' in the lips!"

    Another friend says, of the concept of swing-through lead, "butt, belly, beak, bang!"
     
  10. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    7,328
    Location:
    Shawnee, Kansas, USA
    No, this is definitely not a hunting gun.

    Shot another big batch doves with it yesterday. Same field.

    Mostly ring necks and "laughing doves." No, really, that's what they're called. Google it!

    Got a few rockies, too, but they weren't flying much yesterday.
     
  11. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    7,328
    Location:
    Shawnee, Kansas, USA
    Hey wireguy, if you see this, apparently the ring necked doves we shoot over here in Africa are a different species than the Eurasian collared dove.

    At least...according to Wikipedia.

    One is <i>Streptopelia decaocto</i> and the other is <i>Streptopelia capicola</i>.

    They look pretty much the same to me.
     
  12. oletymer

    oletymer Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    818
    After shooting a trap gun for over 55 years all I can shoot hunting is a trap gun. I have never had a problem getting limits with one.
     
  13. dshot

    dshot Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    457
    I use a Ithaca 5E to hunt turkey in the Spring season.
     
  14. wireguy

    wireguy TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,715
    They sure do look the same. I wonder if there is really any substantial genetic difference. I bet they would interbreed readily. I wonder if our Mourning doves can and do interbreed with the Eurasians.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.