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Hunters- 10x Bino advice

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by kiwiG, Aug 3, 2013.

  1. kiwiG

    kiwiG Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
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    400
    Hi Guys, What 10x binos are you using for largely open ground? Zen Rays seem to represent good value, but there is no stockist here in New Zealand. Bushnell and Leupold both fall in my price bracket, but there are as many people disappointed with them as happy...what are your experiences? Any advice appreciated, also, if you have updated and have a pair surplus to requirements I am interested. Thanks-Graham.
     
  2. kcbullets

    kcbullets Member

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    Nikon Monarch and Vortex are quality.
     
  3. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Deplorable Bitter Clinger in Liberal La La Land
    I've been using the Bushnell H2O 10x25 compact camo binoculars for hunting for quite a while.

    Let me get one thing straight right from the start. There are better binoculars out there.

    So why do I use them?<br>
    <br>
    They're compact.<br>
    They're light.<br>
    They're waterproof.<br>
    They're fog proof.<br>
    They're cheap.<br>
    They have decent enough quality to make them useful.

    I have better binoculars. They usually remain in the vehicle unless I am going to be doing a lot of varmint shooting from one position. I just don't like lugging the extra weight around. These are light enough that they will even fit in some outdoor shirt pockets.

    I am in no way pretending these have superior glass. The contrast is not on a par with high quality binoculars, and you'll have to shield them from sunlight on the lens at low angles. On the other hand, I have not found anything close to them for quality within their price range. A lot of the cheap imports will have bad yellow and blue fuzzy edges to objects. Not with these.

    Price for this particular version is as low as $45 USD. This make them attractive for use as truck binoculars. The rubber covering takes quite a beating. And you won't shed crocodile tears if you bust them up, unlike something that costs ten times more.

    I don't even remember how long ago I bought mine. They were $29 in those days on sale. My son has a set too. we've used them hard for hunting, and also for vacations. They've survived salt spray and salt water while whale watching.

    Even if you get a pair of really good binoculars, consider a pair of these just to have as a lightweight alternative.
     
  4. Pride Engineer

    Pride Engineer Member

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    Sep 14, 2008
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    804
    Optics are better as they cost more. Just ask any reputable guide or outfitter. If you plan to look for critters in great light, at ranges of up to 2-300 yards, all the cheap ones may do the job. If you want to spot a critter in poor light, over 500 yards, or in blending cover, spend the money to get Zeiss, Swarovski, or comparable glass. Nothing worse then having to hike a mile to get closer to look at a critter good glass would have told you it wasn't worth the hike.

    My first big trip was to British Columbia for mountain goat and caribou. My guide and I were sitting on one side of a canyon and glassing the opposite side. My guide said there's a critter. I said where. He pointed. I couldn't find it in my Leupold glasses. I asked him where it was. He pointed to the only large boulder on the opposite slope and said it was just to the left of it. I looked and looked. Could not find it. This was open country, in bright sunlight. I asked to use his Zeiss binocs. There it was, standing upright as plain as day, a small caribou. I switched back to my glasses and could barely see it.

    Another trip to BC found me and my guide watching my moose kill for the grizzly bear that had been feeding on it. We were 250 yards from the kill site and watched all day. At late dusk I saw the bear come to the kill in my Swarovski's. I told the guide there he is. My young guide with his cheap glasses could not find the bear. He didn't believe me but suggested we sneak closer to get a better look. When we were about 75 yards from the kill site, the guide decided to move closer and stepped off the trail. His foot broke a stick and the bear bolted. I said to the guide, "now do you believe me".

    Optics are invaluable to the hunter, whether it be a rifle scope or binocs. By the best because in the end if you hunt seriously, you'll get there anyway.

    Mark Zauhar
     
  5. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Deplorable Bitter Clinger in Liberal La La Land
    I'd say if you can afford a guide and can afford to be hunting mountain sheep, especially in another state or another country, then cost of optics should not be an issue.

    In that case, the best binoculars I ever used were Swarovski. But they better be, they were over $900, and that was a decade ago. My hunting partner had a pair, and it was amazing the detail that could be seen.
     
  6. kiwiG

    kiwiG Member

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    Thanks guys, I would love some Leica's, but for the twice a year I hunt for the pot I can't justify the outlay...when I was younger and single I put euro optics on my rifles and never regretted it...now some good value mid-range bino's should do just fine. Kind regards-Graham.
     
  7. Shooting Sailor

    Shooting Sailor Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    1. Cheap truck binoculars - The 10x25 Bushnells, like Brian said. Very low light transmission, so only to be used in good light.

    2. Mid-range binoculars - Bushnell, Leupold, or comparably priced units. Try them out in varying light conditions, and pick the brightest and clearest.

    3. Good hunting binoculars - You get what you pay for. Personally, I like Swarovskis, but Zeiss are nice, as well. I haven't tried them out, but I hear good things about Vortex.

    I have a pair of Bushnell rubber armored, fixed focus, guaranteed waterproof, 7x50s. They are great for wet, snowy, cold, nasty weather (sounds like every hunting trip, doesn't it?), but they are TOO DA- - HEAVY to wear around your neck all day. Even with a bino harness, they are too heavy. Weight is a big consideration in a hunting bino, so make sure you can get a harness to distribute the weight, otherwise you will be stiff and sore at the end of a long day. If I were to get another set of glasses, over the 4 pairs I have now, I would go for Swarovskis. Seeing the number of guides using them, they must have proven themselves to be the best for the money.
     
  8. 22hornet

    22hornet Well-Known Member

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    Hanford, CA
    I purchased the Vortex Viper HD 10X42 last spring. $599.00 US. Great binoculars. Compact, light weight with excellent clarity and light transmission. The icing on the cake is the unlimited no questions asked lifetime warranty. Good glasses for a reasonable price.
     
  9. 1oz

    1oz Member

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    Location:
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    I use Leica 10 x 42 HD Gevoid been very happy glassing for long periods of time. Less eye fatigue with a good quality glass.
     
  10. jbmi

    jbmi Well-Known Member

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    I have a pair of Swarovskis SLC 7x42 for about 15 years, I don't think you can find anything better. Last year I thought I needed something just a little more powerful for use in my tree stand. I looked and tried a number of mid range glass and settled on Leupold Mojave BX-3 10x42. They also have worked out very well for me. FWIW, when I put them side by side in daylight early morning or late afternoon these old eyes really can't tell any difference between them.
    If there is a difference I don't think the Swaro's are 3 times better for 3 times the cost between the two
     
  11. jim brown

    jim brown Well-Known Member

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    Check the reviews on the birding sites. They use optics and know what they are talking about. Hunters aren't nearly as knowledgeable on optics.

    jim brown
     
  12. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    I agree with B in O on glass - I use a cheap pair of Nikon Monarchs for the day to day stuff. I keep smaller German glass in my truck and carry-on bag (I live in an airplane for work...) - Mogno.

    The 'good stuff' only comes out for special occasions.
     
  13. Jim Bradbury

    Jim Bradbury Member

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    Location:
    Buckley Washington
    I have used Vortex Diamonbacks for the last three years. I cannot see myself using anything else. I have had Bushnell's, and Leupold's. I also own a pair of Nikon's that I am happy with. I do prefer my Vortex binos though.
    JMHO

    Jim Bradbury
     
  14. 5141

    5141 Member

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    Leica Geovid , I have both 10x and 8x great glass....
     
  15. BeerKing

    BeerKing Active Member

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    well put Mark Z. I also found out the hard way in Alaska. Didn't happen when I went back the next time.
     
  16. dls guide

    dls guide Member

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    Good 10x binoculars do not create eye fatuge. Most guides out west use 10x all day long, but they and I use Leica, swarovski, or zeiss. Buy the best glass you can afford. If you glass the vast open area more buy 10x. If you glass both timber and open space buy 8x. I have both and definately like the 8x in timber and archery hunting best. Everybodies eyes are defferent, so go try lots of glasses at a good store, buy what your eyes like best. Good glasses are a lifetime investment. Enjoy. Daryl.
     
  17. 1oz

    1oz Member

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    Before i purchased the Leica's I owned a set of Minox German made 8 x 33 It was very good glass you can find them used in the 400 + will worth the money . They were very clear just not as bright as the leica's.
     
  18. 4EVRYOUNG

    4EVRYOUNG Member

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    Minox, Price not so bad and they are good glass in my opinion. Check Sportsmans Guide on the web the used to have them.