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Hull Inspection Before Reloading

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by nsrailroad, Aug 20, 2009.

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  1. nsrailroad

    nsrailroad Member

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    Someone accidently threw some hulls that they weren't going to reload again in my box with my hulls. Mine only shot once. They were same brand and color. Anyway that I can tell which ones have been shot alot. Nothing visible by eye. Maybe a magnifing glass, if so what to look for.My once fired are reload and recassed for shooting latter or reserve. any help.
    Railroad
     
  2. goatskin

    goatskin TS Member

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    The Remington right, back is a multi-load hull .. the other two (back) are once-fireds. When the crimps are sharp & pointed in, reloading life is about gone.

    Bob


    [​IMG]
     
  3. Quack Shot

    Quack Shot Active Member

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    I'd look for something different like the primer to identify them. If they were reloaded, did he use the same type of primer that the factory does? Some factory primers look different than the replacements. Usually, you can tell a hull that has been loaded several times when compared to a once fired hull. Just looking at the crimp folds is usually enough for the trained eye. What kind of hulls are they? If it's worth the trouble, use a microscope and compare the firing pin indentations. :)
     
  4. nsrailroad

    nsrailroad Member

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    Rem green and black hulls. The primers look the same.
     
  5. spitter

    spitter Well-Known Member TS Supporters

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    My initial reaction would be that if upon close inspection you can't see any difference, there is not enough to worry about. Someone else can chime in, but until the extra hulls deteriorate to a point where you'll be able to visually see imperfections... they should be fine for reuse.

    I seem to recall an article in Shotgun Sports about the degradation of velocities in subsequently reloaded hulls and the drop in velocity was not significant.

    regards all,

    Jay
     
  6. dverna

    dverna Active Member

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    Jay nailed it. If you cannot see a difference, it won't matter. If it bothers you, and it will, use them for practice and get another lot of Gun Clubs once fired for your good shells.

    Rem black and green = cheap hulls anyway. There are usually a lot of these laying around.

    Don Verna
     
  7. Tripod

    Tripod Well-Known Member

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    Scotch tape will allow several more reloading. It helps keep the shot in.
     
  8. ivanhoe

    ivanhoe Well-Known Member

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    nsrailroad if you take your little finger and put the tip of it inside the hull.

    Now feel the inside wall of the hulls a once fired will be quite smooth. A hull that has multiple firings will have a sand paper feel on the inside wall of the hull.

    The more that the hulls are reloaded and fired the rougher the inside wall of the hull will feel until they eventually split or develop a weak spot and a small slit in them.

    For what it is worth that is how I tell.

    Bob Lawless
     
  9. Rick Barker

    Rick Barker Well-Known Member

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    In the future, you might want to consider taking a felt tipped marker (thin line) and drawing a mark on the bottom of the hull, from the primer edge to the outside rim of the hull. This will do a couple of things. You can tell how many times you have reloaded your hulls and it will identify the foreigners. If you color code your shells you can also tell the 2-3/4's from the 3's and 8's from 7-1/2's, unless you shoot just one shell. It takes an extra minute or so to mark them, but I have been doing this for some 30 years and it works for me.
     
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