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How to make trap shooting harder

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by BuddyTrapChamp, Jan 14, 2012.

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  1. BuddyTrapChamp

    BuddyTrapChamp Member

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    Hello everybody I need your input. I coach two youth trap teams and need to find a leafy to make the practices harder. Do you guys have any idea on how I can do this I have kids from 3rd grade to know it all high schoolers
     
  2. ntgr8

    ntgr8 Member

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    Practice like you play. Don't make 2 games, one for pract. and one for competition.
     
  3. BD457

    BD457 Member

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    Sep 3, 2011
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    Location:
    San Diego
    although it shouldn't make it harder, I like having the bird delayed by anywhere from 0-10 seconds after I call for it. It promotes waiting to SEE the bird before the swing.
     
  4. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Shoot practice with a full choke and matches with a modified choke. HMB
     
  5. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Mesquite, Nevada
    Teach the youngsters the importance of "learning how" to shoot 1 shot events, once learned, they'll be tough competitors! That's hard enough learning how to shoot trap for your teams I'd think! Pays big dividends too!

    Hap
     
  6. 20yard

    20yard TS Member

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    Nov 30, 2008
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    I coach trap, I agree with ntgr8 above you need to practice like you compete versus shooting back yardage or annie style practice. With that said you can set-up certain shots just like they can occur in competition. For example I do set the trap on hard Lefts and Rights and have kids shoot from station 1, 3 and 5. You need to make them use the same regular hold points and not cheat since they know where the bird is going, but getting good at those hard lefts and rights builds confidence they know what to do when they see one in competition instead of thinking hard right, I can't hit those. Another practice to teach they have time to see the bird and move the gun is to use different hold points. For example on station 1 have them hold on right side of house instead of usual left corner. Kids see that they still can get to the bird and break it no problem, teaches them any hold point can work it's about seeing the bird, getting to the bird and then breaking the bird, there is plenty of time. Last I do a round where I have the control and turn off the mics occasionally, this is to see if they move the gun before they see the bird, and then explain why thats bad. Also hold your practice regardless of weather, a little snow and alot of wind prepares kids for those competition days when a little wind might blow, talk about strategies with wind, shooting a little earlier when target is less eratic? Making sure to stay in the gun and adjust if target jumps. I always end practice with a regular round of trap, having lead off say the "squad reday", "puller ready", "lets see one". After broken birds asking to "clear the house" I calling losses, no coaching. this re-enforces competition conditions and makes kids practice these saying these things.
    In my view the most important thing is the trap coach must be a positive coach building confidence in the shooter. This sport is as much if not more mental than vision & hand coordination. Get kids believing they can break any target, all losses are avoidable. Remember shoot the hats for first 25 straight, aand celebrate as a team, they love that tradition. I also track team straight run records during shoots, it usually improves thru the season and it's a combined-effort goal which is nice to build teamwork.
     
  7. Twinbirds

    Twinbirds TS Member

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    not trying to make it harder but IMHO best way to practice is

    10 birds post 1

    5 birds post 3

    10 birds on post 5

    this gives twice the amount of practice on hard posts and still keeps you honest in the middle on straight aways. Good luck and thanks for helping to pass the torch.
     
  8. open choke

    open choke TS Member

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    Make them always shoot at the fence :p
     
  9. Barry C. Roach

    Barry C. Roach Well-Known Member

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    9,209
    Location:
    Scottsdale, AZ
    Not the best approach for teaching a "skill". Don't make them shoot convoluted games that just develop bad habits. If you want them to become proficient in any game practice that game. Good luck coach.
     
  10. Sam (ATA Noobie)

    Sam (ATA Noobie) Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    327
    Coach used to score us on how many pieces we broke off of the target. 2 points for a split, 5 points for a smash/5+ pieces.

    Made you really focus on the bird and was a great confidence booster. It was no longer 'break the target' it was 'I know I'm going to break it, but I want to SMASH it!'

    Worked very well for me.
     
  11. Unknown1

    Unknown1 Well-Known Member

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    Practice with "mini" or "midi" targets in place of the full sized targets: <center>
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    </center>

    Keller
     
  12. BigBadBob

    BigBadBob TS Member

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    Jul 28, 2011
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    861
    Once the kids have the mechanics of foot positioning, gun mount, hold, point, soft focus etc. it is practice as though it is the AIM or SCTP Nationals. This year the focus will be on the $100,000 or the Kolar shotgun.(ha-ha)

    We print a collated journal for every kid. The journal has all kinds of useful information. We start out with the basic safety items, gun care, clothing, etc. There are many pages set up for practice days.There will also be the same pages for competition days. The page will have lines set up for date, time, wind speed, sky conditions, temperature, etc. there will be lines for daily goals, projection of hit to miss ratio, "what I did wrong" ,what I need to work on, coach comments. And that last item, coach comment, each shooter is required to have a coach comment and sign the journal each practice day.

    We treat it as "homework". Each shooter is required to have their journal at each practice and competition. it is to be kept in their range bag.

    Above all, practice should be treated as seriously as competition.
     
  13. BIGDON

    BIGDON Well-Known Member

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    6,625
    Location:
    Michigan
    Don't forget they are kids. After the serious practice time is over, have some fun. Line them up on the 27 or 30 and take a shot and then buy the winners a pop.

    Don
     
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