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How to clean 1100

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by nailer123, May 12, 2009.

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  1. nailer123

    nailer123 TS Member

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    One of the girls on the high school trap team needs to total clean her 1100.
    I saw a thread that showed every thing taken a part but i cant find it .I would like to print it out for .Thanks for the help
     
  2. roger8918

    roger8918 Member

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    http://www.shotgunworld.com/bbs/viewtopic.php?f=55&t=91897
     
  3. Easystreet

    Easystreet Well-Known Member

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    The Owner's Manual for the 1100 will tell you all you need to know to disassemble and clean the 1100 and how to put it back together again. It even has diagrams of all the parts as well as several pictures (diagrams) of the various stages of disassembly.

    If you have trouble reading or following that, let us know what particular problem you are having and I'm sure we can get an answer for you. Give it a try. It's not difficult.

    Easystreet
     
  4. gkinla

    gkinla Member

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    Here is another thread from shotgunworld.com...this has to do with longevity tips for the Remington 1100.
     
  5. GBatch_25

    GBatch_25 Active Member

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    Try the above URL. You can print our a PDF with tips and photos of disassembly.

    Somewhere out there, there is a video of a gunsmith cleaning an 1100. Maybe someone here can chime in on that.

    Gene Batchelar
    Wheaton, IL
     
  6. mt

    mt Member

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    One of the members at our club related that he viewed some excellent instructional video's on youtube. Reportedly they demonstrate how to take apart the 1100, clean it and reassemble.
     
  7. J.D. Squire

    J.D. Squire Member

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    Kirk bring me the gun on thursday at league and i'll take care of it.

    J.D.
     
  8. Joe Potosky

    Joe Potosky Well-Known Member

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    <object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/wL8DuXEU9pQ&hl=en&fs=1&rel=0"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/wL8DuXEU9pQ&hl=en&fs=1&rel=0" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>
     
  9. mrskeet410

    mrskeet410 TS Member

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    Once clean, use BreakFreeCLP. Unless used in the rain, it may never need cleaning again.
     
  10. pyrdek

    pyrdek Well-Known Member

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    The video is not a COMPLETE or TOTAL cleaning.

    The bolt can fall free of the bolt if the carrier is tipped so don't let it fall. Cleaning the firing pin spring, and the bolt should be done but it does not have to be removed from the bolt unless it is broken and must be replaced. Also check the recoil buffer (small pin in a plastic bushing on the rear of the carrier). Replace it if it is excessively battered or cracked. . Remember to put a drop of oil in the ejector spring pin on the bolt when reassembling the bolt to the carrier. Putting a small amount of grease on the internal rails where the carrier slides is useful. It only takes a small dab. Excessive oil or grease will only collect dirt and grime.

    In the video he failed to point out that the link has a slight curvature. It is important to replace this link in the same orientation as it was originally installed. Failure to do this will lock up the action when you try to open it.

    For cleaning the trigger group, I just use a spray gun cleaner (or if I want to save money, automotive brake cleaner spray) to flush out the unburned powder. This also removes any oil or grease so LIGHTLY re-oiling is needed after the spray cleaning. DO not let the cleaning spray drip on the wood or damage to the finish may occur. I know of someone who uses an ultrasonic cleaner but I think that may be a bit of overkill.

    He did not show cleaning the gas ports. A small properly sized drill TURNED BY HAND can be used to clear carbon fouling out of the holes. If this is done once, and a pipe cleaner dipped in gun cleaning solvent is used at each cleaning, the drill bit process can usually be avoided for an extended time period. The proper drill is a numbered machinist drill but I can not recall the exact number. I will have to look in the shop manual to get the proper number.

    Pay attention to the gas rings BEFORE you remove them. The older two pice rings had a flat side that pushed the carrier and a "stepped" side that fit into the flat ring with the gas pushing the stepped side. Inspect for cracks and chipped pieces. When reassembling, insure that the splits on the two rings are 180 dg. apart. Newer versions have a single integrated ring package.

    The recoil spring tube can sometimes require cleaning if it has not be cleaned in quite some time. It is NOT needed to do this at every cleaning. Once a year for a trap gun is probably adequate unless you notice problems in failing to eject or feed the second round (using 2 3/4 DE type shells). After removing the Link, for a complete cleaning, also remove the butt plate. If it is still the Remington original recoil pad, put a drop of VEGETABLE oil on a round shaft Phillips screwdriver (mine uses a #1 Philips) but some people use a #2, see if the shaft will fit the holes in the rubber recoil pad) and remove the two wood screws that attach the recoil pad and spacer.

    You will now see a hole with what appears to be a BIG screw slotted nut. It is really a special kind of fastener. Here it gets a bit more interesting. There is a special tool to remove this "nut" but if you don't want to buy the tool, a 7/8" wood boring bit with the center point ground off and the cutting edges of the borer ground flat, will fit the hole and the slot. Use a wrench or vise-grips to turn the modified wood bore bit. If this nut has never been removed, IT WILL BE TIGHTER THAN YOU THINK IT COULD BE. You may have to CAREFULLY put the stock in a PADDED vise and use considerable torque to loosen the "nut". This will allow the stock to be removed from the recoil spring tube. Watch that you do not drop the stock. Remove the nut and the lock washer.

    You now have access to the recoil spring. It is a fairly powerful spring so be careful in the next steps to NOT LET IT FLY FREE.

    There is a pin through the recoil spring shaft. This pin holds the recoil spring in. To remove it use a small screwdriver to depress the end of the spring along the side of the pin, just a little bit. then, HOLDING THE SPRING IT WITH THE SCREWDRIVER, drive the pin out of the tube. Carefully back the screwdriver out keeping the spring under control. You can then remove the spring and the "cup" that sits on the receiver end of the spring to accept the two prongs on the Link. A .30 cal mop and patches can be used to clean the inside of the tube. Note that if the tube has not been cleaned in a long time or if excessive amounts of dirt have accumulated in the tube, it may be a bit difficult to get the cup out of the tube.

    Some people use a drop or two of oil on the inside of the tube. I prefer a little powdered graphite.

    Reverse the procedure to replace the cup, spring and pin. TIGHTLY screw the "nut in place. Otherwise the stock can get a bit loose.

    Also not shown, and usually not needed, unless problems develop feeding shells from the magazine or if the shotgun has been exposed to heavy rain or water immersion, is cleaning the magazine tube and follower. THERE IS A POWERFUL SPRING PUSHING ON THIS CAP SO BE >VERY< VERY CAREFUL TO NOT LET IT GET FREE!!! When you have the forend and barrel removed, CAREFULLY remove the magazine tube cap. The 1100 used a pressure cap that had to be worked out carefully using a screw driver. When working with this cap, watch out because the spring behind it can "LAUNCH" it out of the tube with great force. (The 11-87 with its "depress and quarter turn " type cap is a definite improvement.) Carefully ride the spring out of the magazine tube and remove the follower to clean it. If the magazine plug (restricts magazine capacity to a "two in the tube" limit) it will also come out with the spring. Note which way it is facing. It has a round end and a larger flat end. When replacing it be sure to use the same orientation as when it was removed.

    If you want to get the trigger group completely disassembled, get the shop manual. There are too many things that have be just right to try to explain the dis-assembly process here.
     
  11. Tripod

    Tripod Well-Known Member

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    well said pyrdek
     
  12. Too Tall

    Too Tall TS Member

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    Is this one of the older ones made out of steel? If so, se a brush to clean the receiver rails and a patch wrapped around the brush to remove the solvent. Do not and I repeat, DO NOT USE YOUR FINGERS, PERIOD. You WILL slice your fingertips open. Don't be a dummy like I was. I did it once and it took 2 weeks before the the cuts stopped opening. It will be like running your fingertips over a sharp knife.

    Robert H.
     
  13. Easystreet

    Easystreet Well-Known Member

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    I think that the receiver on ALL 1100's is made of steel. Stick a magnet to the side of it to be sure.

    Easystreet
     
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