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how to check k32 for wear and tear and if it needs

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by lovethesport, Jul 8, 2012.

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  1. lovethesport

    lovethesport Member

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2009
    Messages:
    735
    looking to buy a k32 awith appx 4500 serial number....

    is there any particular areas look for wear and tear and whetner the gun needs rebuilding or not
     
  2. Rebel Sympathy

    Rebel Sympathy Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2010
    Messages:
    1,682
    Location:
    Pea Patch, Alabama
    1) Is the opening lever well to the shooter's right (gun mounted)? It should be - with 1/16" to as much as nearly 1/8" gap between the sliding hood and barrel shoulders as viewed from each side. This can be repaired. However, it is not inexpensive.

    2) Is the standing breech smooth, or does it show a lot of wear from the two ejectors and from shell rims scraping down the center over the firing pin apertures and breech itself, as the gun is closed? Wear here does not necessarily indicate a problem; it indicates how much the gun has been shot. This can be improved, but the wear patterns not ever completely obliterated.

    3) The radius at the back of the fore arm iron should hug the radius at the front of the receiver with no significant gaps between the two as checked with the gun in a closed position. If this gap grows (from wear, or from mis-match due to improper barrel fit due to barrel change, or wear to the fore arm lug), eventually the ejectors will fail to fire upon opening. This can be easily repaired. Here's the point: Proper ejector function is an indicator of good barrel fit and fore arm lug condition.

    4) Look at the firing pin tips with the aid of a magnifying glass. If they are "cratered" or pitted, it is time to replace. This indicates it is also time for an Annual Service - $250 to $300 - which will also clean, lube and replace all essential springs, etc..

    Some 35 years ago an avid skeet shooter once told me, "There is nothing on a Krieghoff (32) that wears which cannot be replaced." He was pretty close to right. I have a 32 Crown 4-barrel set which has easily seen over 250,000 rounds through it - most before I aquired/rescued it. I spent $3,000 on it a couple of years ago, having it completely rebuilt at Ottsville. This included the "Annual", plus rebuilding all the barrel shoulders and fore arm lugs to "snug" the gun, masterfully rebluing all four barrels and rebluing the rest of the iron as well. The cost was exacerbated by the fact it was a 4-barrel skeet set. It probably would have cost $1,000, or less, to do a single gauge gun. It looks brand new, shoots magnificiently and is well into its second 250,000 rounds.... I admit, I am not hard on my guns; but I also shoot this thing all the time. It is named "Oedipus Rex", because it is a King (Crown Grade) and it is a real "Muh-Fuh" (use your own translation - see Athenian Tragedy) when I am on my game. It is also the pride and joy of my shooting life - and a work of art by German master engraver, Roland Schmidt.

    In summary, there are many K-32 Kriggy-guns that are shot to pieces and are worth maybe only $750. There are many others which are tight and have been shot very little - and worth $2500 (for a standard grade single barrel) and you could not wear them out if you shot them for the rest of your life.

    Condition - Condition - Condition.......

    Rebel Sympathy (in November 2012),
    Mike
     
  3. APrice

    APrice Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2009
    Messages:
    1,208
    Mike, could you give us some specifics on where to pick up those $750 K-32's?

    "Kriggy-guns?"
     
  4. Rebel Sympathy

    Rebel Sympathy Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    Messages:
    1,682
    Location:
    Pea Patch, Alabama
    Aprice:

    First, I did not say they could be bought for $750; I said they were worth maybe $750. Usually the worst mistake a person can make is buying a low-condition gun for "cheap", thinking they will fix it up and have a bargain. It seldom works that way.....

    And, yes, I can cite an example. I bought a real early gun (3-diget serial number) with 26" mismatched barrels for $750 last year at a small show in Dothan, Alabama. It was a Standard grade gun and showed considerable wear to the action. It had the early style rib posts. However, at least it had Krieghoff triggers - Not Remington 32 triggers.

    Then, by the time I would have spent $900 having it totally rebuilt (no wood work), I would have $1650 + the cost of freight in it. It would not have sold for that..... So, I dumped it to a guy in Montgomery. I made a mistake because I bought from the heart, rather than the brain.

    "Kriggys" That is how I have "tagged" them for 35-years. Just a personal liberty I have taken. I like it; you don't have to...

    Mike
     
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