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How to catch wild pigs

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Pony Keg, Jul 27, 2007.

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  1. Pony Keg

    Pony Keg TS Member

    Joined:
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    There was a Chemistry professor in a large college that had some
    exchange students in the class. One day while the class was in the lab the professor noticed one young man (exchange student) who kept rubbing his back and stretching as if his back hurt.

    The professor asked the young man what was the matter. The student
    told him he had a bullet lodged in his back. He had been shot while
    fighting communists in his native country who were trying to overthrow his
    country's government and install a new communist government.

    In the midst of his story he looked at the professor and asked a
    strange question.

    He asked, " Do you know how to catch wild pigs?"

    The professor thought it was a joke and asked for the punch line. The
    young man said this was no joke.

    "You catch wild pigs by finding a suitable place in the woods and
    putting corn on the ground. The pigs find it and begin to come everyday to
    eat the free corn. When they are used to coming every day, you put a
    fence down one side of the place where they are used to coming. When they
    get used to the fence, they begin to eat the corn again and you put up
    another side of the fence. They get used to that and start to eat again.
    You continue until you have all four sides of the fence up with a gate in
    the last side. the pigs, who are used to the free corn, start to come
    through the gate to eat, you slam the gate on them and catch the whole herd.
    Suddenly the wild pigs have lost their freedom. They run around and
    around inside the fence, but they are caught. Soon they go back to
    eating the free corn. They are so used to it that they have forgotten how to
    forage in the woods for themselves, so they accept their captivity.

    The young man told the professor that that is exactly what he sees
    happening to America. The government keeps pushing us toward socialism
    and keeps spreading the free corn out in the form of programs such as Social Security, supplemental income, tax credit for unearned income, tobacco subsidies, dairy subsidies, payments not to plant crops (CRP), welfare, teen pregnancy payments, medicine, drugs, etc. while we continually lose our freedoms--just a little at a time.

    This is totally off topic but I thought it would be a good read.

    "From each according to thier ability to each according to thier needs" Karl Marx
     
  2. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Green Bay Wisconsin
    Unfortunately, the pig only gets free corn for a limited time. The next thing that happens is bacon and ham.

    HM
     
  3. SOLOR GUY

    SOLOR GUY TS Member

    Joined:
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    Messages:
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    socialism would be a vast improvement over what we have now. I can dig it
     
  4. hubcap

    hubcap TS Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2006
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    417
    Solor Guy - If you think socialism is so great why not just move to a socialistic country and leave ours alone? There are many of us who think our country is just fine the way it is. I can dig that.

    hubcap
     
  5. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Deplorable Bitter Clinger in Liberal La La Land
    Here's the original version, which I've posted here before:<br>
    <br>
    The Wild and Free Pigs of the Okefenokee Swamp<br>
    <br>
    Some years ago, about 1900, an old trapper from North Dakota hitched up some horses to his Studebaker wagon, packed a few possessions -- especially his traps -- and drove south. Several weeks later he stopped in a small town just north of the Okefenokee Swamp in Georgia. It was a Saturday morning -- a lazy day -- when he walked into the general store. Sitting around the pot-bellied stove were seven or eight of the town's local citizens.<br>
    <br>
    The traveler spoke. "Gentlemen, could you direct me to the Okefenokee Swamp?" Some of the oldtimers looked at him like he was crazy. "You must be a stranger in these parts," they said. "I am. I'm from North Dakota," said the stranger. "In the Okefenokee Swamp are thousands of wild hogs." one old man explained. "A man who goes into the swamp by himself asks to die!" He lifted up his leg. "I lost half my leg here, to the pigs of the swamp." Another old fellow said, "Look at the cuts on me; look at my arm bit off! Those pigs have been free since the Revolution, eating snakes and rooting out roots and fending for themselves for over a hundred years. They're wild and they're dangerous. You can't trap them. No man dare go into the swamp by himself." Every man nodded his head in agreement.<br>
    <br>
    The old trapper said, "Thank you so much for the warning. Now could you direct me to the swamp?" They said, "Well, yeah, it's due south -- straight down the road." But they begged the stranger not to go, because they knew he'd meet a terrible fate. He said, "Sell me ten sacks of corn, and help me load it in the wagon." And they did. Then the old trapper bid them farewell and drove on down the road. The townsfolk thought they'd never see him again. Two weeks later the man came back. He pulled up to the general store, got down off the wagon, walked in and bought ten more sacks of corn. After loading it up he went back down the road toward the swamp.<br>
    <br>
    Two weeks later he returned and again bought ten sacks of corn. This went on for a month. And then two months, and three. Every week or two the old trapper would come into town on a Saturday morning, load up ten sacks of corn, and drive off south into the swamp. The stranger soon became a legend in the little village and the subject of much speculation. People wondered what kind of devil had possessed this man, that he could go into the Okefenokee by himself and not be consumed by the wild and free hogs.<br>
    <br>
    One morning the man came into town as usual. Everyone thought he wanted more corn. He got off the wagon and went into the store where the usual group of men were gathered around the stove. He took off his gloves. "Gentlemen," he said, "I need to hire about ten or fifteen wagons. I need twenty or thirty men. I have six thousand hogs out in the swamp, penned up, and they're all hungry. I've got to get them to market right away." "You've WHAT in the swamp?" asked the storekeeper, incredulously. "I have six thousand hogs penned up. They haven't eaten for two or three days, and they'll starve if I don't get back there to feed and take care of them."<br>
    <br>
    One of the oldtimers said, "You mean you've captured the wild hogs of the Okefenokee?" "That's right." "How did you do that? What did you do?" the men urged, breathlessly. One of them exclaimed, "But I lost my arm!" "I lost my brother!" cried another. "I lost my leg to those wild boars!" chimed a third. The trapper said, "Well, the first week I went in there they were wild all right. They hid in the undergrowth and wouldn't come out. I dared not get off the wagon. So I spread corn along behind the wagon. Every day I'd spread a sack of corn. The old pigs would have nothing to do with it."<br>
    <br>
    "But the younger pigs decided that it was easier to eat free corn than it was to root out roots and catch snakes. So the very young began to eat the corn first. I did this every day. Pretty soon, even the old pigs decided that it was easier to eat free corn. After all, they were all free; they were not penned up. They could run off in any direction they wanted at any time."<br>
    <br>
    "The next thing was to get them used to eating in the same place all the time. So I selected a clearing, and I started putting the corn in the clearing. At first they wouldn't come to the clearing. It was too far. It was too open. It was a nuisance to them." "But the very young decided that it was easier to take the corn in the clearing than it was to root out roots and catch their own snakes. And not long thereafter, the older pigs also decided that it was easier to come to the clearing every day."<br>
    <br>
    "And so the pigs learned to come to the clearing every day to get their free corn. They could still subsidize their diet with roots and snakes and whatever else they wanted. After all, they were all free. They could run in any direction at any time. There were no bounds upon them." "The next step was to get them used to fence posts. So I put fence posts all the way around the clearing. I put them in the underbrush so that they wouldn't get suspicious or upset. After all, they were just sticks sticking up out of the ground, like the trees and the brush. The corn was there every day. It was easy to walk in between the posts, get the corn, and walk back out."<br>
    <br>
    "This went on for a week or two. Shortly they became very used to walking into the clearing, getting the free corn, and walking back out through the fence posts." "The next step was to put one rail down at the bottom. I also left a few openings, so that the older, fatter pigs could walk through the openings and the younger pigs could easily jump over just one rail. After all, it was no real threat to their freedom or independence. They could always jump over the rail and flee in any direction at any time."<br>
    <br>
    "Now I decided that I wouldn't feed them every day. I began to feed them every other day. On the days I didn't feed them the pigs still gathered in the clearing. They squealed, and they grunted, and they begged and pleaded with me to feed them. But I only fed them every other day. And I put a second rail around the posts." "Now the pigs became more and more desperate for food. Because now they were no longer used to going out and digging their own roots and finding their own food. They now needed me. They needed my corn every other day. So I trained them that I would feed them every day if they came in through a gate. And I put up a third rail around the fence. But it was still no great threat to their freedom, because there were several gates and they could run in and out at will."<br>
    <br>
    "Finally I put up the fourth rail. Then I closed all the gates but one, and I fed them very, very well. Yesterday I closed the last gate. And today I need you to help me take these pigs to market." -- end of story -- The price of free corn The allegory of the pigs has a serious moral lesson. This story is about federal money being used to bait, trap and enslave a once free and independent people. Federal welfare, in its myriad forms, has reduced not only individuals to a state of dependency. State and local governments are also on the fast track to elimination, due to their functions being subverted by the command and control structures of federal "revenue sharing" programs.<br>
    <br>
    Please copy this flyer and send it to all your state and local elected leaders and other concerned citizens. Tell them: "Just say NO to federal corn." The bacon you save may be your own.
     
  6. birdogs

    birdogs TS Member

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    The real moral of the story is not the fence, the corn OR the pigs. It is the people who put out the corn,put up the fence and close the gate. Want to be in Obama's or Hillary's feed lot? Thinka about it!
     
  7. Dr.Longshot

    Dr.Longshot Banned Banned

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    5,722
    I have 5 bags of CORN.

    Dr.longshot
     
  8. Pony Keg

    Pony Keg TS Member

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